Rerouting pipeing


  #1  
Old 10-04-06, 06:50 PM
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Rerouting pipeing

The basement of our house has simple wood paneling that has been painted over by the previous owners. Long story short it looks pretty crappy and I'd like to redo all the walls of the basement with drywall.

My biggest concern with the project is dealing with the hot water register baseboards. Currently the registers are flush against the framing and the paneling is cut out around the baseboards. What I'd like to do is run drywall along the framing and then have the registers run flush with the drywall. This means that the registers will need to move out from the wall an additional 1/2" from it's current position

The piping is run though the concrete and emerges near the framing and then immediately has 2 elbows. My opinion on the situation is that there is no room cut the pipe before the current elbows because I don't think there is enough room for a sleeve and sweating the fitting before the piping goes into the concrete. Personally I feel the piping needs to be cut near the fins but I figured I'd post here and see what everyones opinion is.

Problem then becomes how to move the pipe out 1/2" so the register is moved out 1/2" to allow the drywall to fit.

Pictures of the situation are posted here

http://www.hagelstrom.com/1.jpg
http://www.hagelstrom.com/2.jpg
 
  #2  
Old 10-05-06, 06:58 AM
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Can you post a photo that steps back a couple feet to show the overall context (paneling, baseboard, framing, etc.)? Feel like I've got my nose right against your piping.

Is the piping coming out of the concrete sleeved in any way? Was the floor poured on the piping or is this a retrofit. It looks like there's a lot of corrosion back there. "Unsweating" or cutting and cleaning might not leave you with much stub to work with.

Short answer is yes, you can do this. My probable approach would be to remove the first 90 and clean up that mess. Looks like a leak. Then come out to leave 5/8" for the drywall before the next 90 that has the sideways bleeder. Basically you're removing the baseboard, getting the rough piping right, installing the wall/drywall, then installing the fin-tube and covers.
 
 

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