Baseboard on curved wall !


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Old 11-14-06, 08:58 PM
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Baseboard on curved wall !

Hello all,

I am in the process of installing hydronic heating in a new kitchen. Unfortunately the kitchen has very little wall space for baseboards.
As per my heatloss calcs, I will be installing two 8K BTU kickspace heaters, and 16 ft of slantfin30 by the large windows.

The wall that i want to install the baseboard on, has a slight curve ( 1 foot peak at the center of the wall which is 20 ft long ).
I think the element itself is somewhat flexible. But I am not sure how to cover it, even if I get the element on the wall.
The curve of the wall is not enough to be able to install the baseboard in sections.
Any ideas?
I once saw a cover made from marble tiles in a kitchen that had a breakfast area with a curved wall. Has anyone ever attempted this?

Thanks in advance.
Mike
 
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Old 11-15-06, 10:45 AM
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Perhaps use something other than baseboard? Maybe a pair of panel radiators (e.g.,www.mysoninc.com) to give you what you need for output. Or other type of higher-output radiation that doesn't require using most or all of the wall space.

I trust you are zoning and pumping this heating circuit properly. Two toekicks is a lot of resistance.

Your design day heat loss is ~16,000 BTU/hr in the kitchen? Big kitchen?
 
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Old 11-15-06, 12:28 PM
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Originally Posted by xiphias
Perhaps use something other than baseboard? Maybe a pair of panel radiators (e.g.,www.mysoninc.com) to give you what you need for output. Or other type of higher-output radiation that doesn't require using most or all of the wall space.

There are a lot of large windows and sliding doors. Not much free area to work with.

I trust you are zoning and pumping this heating circuit properly. Two toekicks is a lot of resistance.

I am going to use monoflo tees to tap the 3/4 pipe.

Your design day heat loss is ~16,000 BTU/hr in the kitchen? Big kitchen?
It is a 20X20 kitchen with many large windows and high ceiling.
 
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Old 11-15-06, 12:56 PM
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If you've got 16 ft continuous space for baseboard, I meant trying to get a couple smaller rads on the wall where the baseboard would go, to give you the ~8k output needed. I'm pondering the same thing in an under-radiated room, and came up with two 55"Lx12"H panel rads at ~4k output each to replace ~15 ft of baseboard. Fit should be fine under the big windows in this particular space.

Failing that, if you can bend the element, perhaps doing a custom cover as you suggest is the answer. Sheet metal (powder-coated or painted, naturally) or tile, I suppose.

Toekicks with monoflows add significantly to the resistance of the loop. A typical diverter tee (taco, for example) is 29 ft of equivalent 3/4" pipe. Depending on how you plumb it (one or two per toekick), that's ~60-120 ft of equivalent pipe just in those fittings. A well-intentioned builder stuck a toekick with two monoflows under a counter for us, without asking. Very nice except it put that heating loop at shutoff head for the circulator. Oops, no flow.

Sounds like a nice kitchen. Good luck!
 
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Old 11-15-06, 01:36 PM
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Toekicks with monoflows add significantly to the resistance of the loop. A typical diverter tee (taco, for example) is 29 ft of equivalent 3/4" pipe. Depending on how you plumb it (one or two per toekick), that's ~60-120 ft of equivalent pipe just in those fittings. A well-intentioned builder stuck a toekick with two monoflows under a counter for us, without asking. Very nice except it put that heating loop at shutoff head for the circulator. Oops, no flow.

What did you end up doing?
Did you have to go with a larger circulator, or did you re-pipe / remove the heater?

Mike.
 
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Old 11-15-06, 01:49 PM
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Took out the toekick. Actually still have the unit. A Beacon-Morris Twin-Flo III. Want it? No reasonable offer refused....

At the time, the heating system was 3 zone valves and one circ, so out came the toekick and monoflows to restore order and sanity. New heating system zones with circs so yes, could have easily gone that route for that zone (which is what I would have to do if I added the panel rads -- swap a 007 for a Grundfos 15-58 or 008). Turns out the space heats great without it as the rest of the emitters were sized without a toekick in mind. The builder's intent was "foot warmer" but was way overkill all the way around.
 
 

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