Hot water circulation problem


  #1  
Old 12-03-06, 10:13 AM
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Hot water circulation problem

Hello,
i have an old fuel fired hot water baseboard heating system n a 2 story house. I had a technician (a kid) put in a new circulating pump last spring it seemed to work ok even though i questioned his knowledge after he took the old pump off and didn't have a plan for all the water that ran all over my basement floor, but now that it is colder the heaters don't get hot enough to bring the room temp up. I have added water so to get 15-18 and also turned on a valve that allows flow to upstairs which he obviously turned off when the water started coming and didnt turn back on. There is also a valve next to that i opened and let the air out of the upstairs system till water only came.

I guess my question is could he have put the pump in upside down or wired it backwards? And how do i determine which way it is flowing, or would it even work that way?
In case it matters the pump is on the back of the unit installed on a pipe going into the bottom of the unit.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.
 
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Old 12-03-06, 12:51 PM
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It is certainly possible to install it backwards. There is usually and arrow on the cast metal of the pump indicating the direction it pumps. If it is on the pipe coming out of the boiler(usually the supply) then the pump should point arrow upwards/ away from the boiler. If the circ is on the pipe that goes into the boiler near the bottom(return) then the arrow should point inwards/down towards the boiler.

Other problems could be air in the system if he didn't purge it after he installed the new pump and filled the system. If you can post some pics that could help us confirm if the pump is installed "backwards".
 
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Old 12-03-06, 01:27 PM
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Thanks for the reply first off and i went and looked and there are 2 arrows on the cast housing and they do point down and since the pump is mounted on the pipe that goes to the bottom of the boiler then according to your post we can assume it is installed properly, right?
Also after doing some more reading i went to each baseboard and bled them but i only got any air from one of them and it wasn't a lot. Is that what you mean by purge?
It seems like the baseboards are a little warmer now and the house is up to 65 compared to 59 this morning it feels good, i suppose that could be the sun though The temp on the boiler gets to 140 and shuts the burner down is that hot enough?
Thanks in advance.
 
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Old 12-03-06, 01:32 PM
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You can purge the air from each zone by shutting off the return valve and opening up the boiler drain valve on each zone. This will force the hot water from the boiler through each zone. When the draining water gets hot all the air should be gone. Put a bucket or hose on each one and be careful because the water will be scalding hot.
 
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Old 12-03-06, 02:27 PM
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If this is an oil-fired system, you should be ok at 140F, but that's a minimum. Assuming no air problems, etc. you should be able to bump up the aquastat to 160 or 180 and you should warm up faster (with a minor to modest increase in fuel use). Is this your first year in the house?
 
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Old 12-03-06, 03:04 PM
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I have lived in the house for 15 years and i have never had this problem before, it seems to be related to the new pump.
I also never really noticed what the temperature was before.
The aquastat is at 160 but the gauge that shows altitude/pressure/ and temperature says 140 so maybe i should adjust to a higher temp because the baseboards dont seem nearly as warm as they used to. according to different threads i have read it appears that air in the system can cause that also right? Although i have gained another degree in the last 2 hours so maybe i am making headway.
 
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Old 12-03-06, 04:55 PM
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Just checking on the temp. If you haven't messed with the aquastat, that's fine. First guess is air problem. Second guess is inadequate pump. Any idea what the old pump is, and can you read the brand/model info on the new? Any idea what kind of piping system this is (series loop with baseboard, monoflow tee with baseboard or rad?
 
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Old 12-03-06, 06:13 PM
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I did turn up the aquastat to 180 now it stays at 160 on the temp gauge and a couple of the baseboards are warmer (including the upstairs)and i finally got the house up to temp now.
The old pump was a Bell&Gossett 1/12 hp, 1ph, 60 cy.
The new pump is a Grundfos type up 15-42F,1 ph,60hz.
This is a old system and the only valve i can open is one that is on the pipe that comes from the upstairs and after i was able to "purge" that line they were hotter than the downstairs.
Any chance that the rest of the system will work itself out since i turned up the heat?
And I'm not sure how tell if series loop or monoflow.
 
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Old 12-03-06, 08:15 PM
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Do you happen to have a model # on that old B&G? See if we can do a spec comparision with the new grundfos.

Still could be air, do you have any auto air elimination near the boiler? Like a little air vent or air scoop?
 
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Old 12-04-06, 06:17 PM
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Mono-Flo or Series Loop

If there is a main pipe which goes all the way around the basement with a bunch of tees off of it, you probably have a mono-flo tee system. With a mono-flo tee system, there must be a means of venting air at each heat emitter. It is unusual to see baseboard piped this way.
Series loop systems simply flow from one emitter to the next in series & lack all of the tees seen with a mono-flo system.
 
 

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