Problems with Indirect Hot Water


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Old 12-05-06, 06:35 AM
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Problems with Indirect Hot Water

I have a Burnham RS-series hydronic system feeding a two-story house where each radiator is fed by an individual pipe from a main stem in the attic. This is my first winter in the house and I'm having trouble with the residential hot water. I have an indirect coil water heater. When the heating system is active and water is circulating, my hot water from the tap is cool to luke warm. It may take 15-20 min to get hot water to the tap. The thermostat is set at 140 (low) to 160 (high). System PSI when running is around 20, 15 when off. I suspect the water level in the boiler tank is too low to reach the coils. Any help in fixing this would make the wife happy and my life easier.
 
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Old 12-05-06, 02:56 PM
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Is there a mixing valve (tempering valve) on the hot water line ? Maybe that went screwy on ya, or someone turned the knob way cold ?

I would think if you didn't have water in the boiler, you would be complaining about no heat... but your gauge is showing pressure, so you most likely have enough water in the boiler.

Is the line to the indirect heater on a zone valve or circulator ? Are they opertating properly ? Is there a temp gauge on the indirect ?
 
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Old 12-05-06, 04:18 PM
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The temperature settings may be too low. It would be more evident if it was very cold outside. Then you would probably not have enough heat for the house either. You can try elevating the boiler water temperature to 160 low and 180 high. You should not cause a scald problem because your indirect tank has its own thermostat to regulate domestic water temperature.

Ken
 
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Old 12-05-06, 08:27 PM
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Originally Posted by kirchen
I have an indirect coil water heater. When the heating system is active and water is circulating, my hot water from the tap is cool to luke warm. .
You sure it's not a "tankless" ??

If you had an indirect, there would be heating pipes leading to a water heater tank.

If you have a tankless, there will also be a low limit control on the boiler. What's that set at ?
 
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Old 12-06-06, 07:04 AM
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I believe I mischaracterized my system. I do not have a separate water heater tank (i.e. indirect system), but rather a tankless system with what I suppose is coils within the main boiler tank. The low limit control is set at 140, high 160 with a 15 deg differential. There is no mixing valve.
 
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Old 12-06-06, 03:59 PM
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That's what I thought when I re-read yer post... OK...

In a properly operating system, and no mixing valve, you would want to be careful about increasing the temps on the boiler. You really don't want 150-180 degree water coming out the taps or showerhead! OUCH!

How is the tankless piped ? One pipe in, one pipe out ? Is there a bypass arrangement on it ? If so, are you sure the bypass valve is not open ?

Does the OUT pipe on the tankless get hot ?

Are you absolutely certain that there isn't a mixing/tempering valve in the system somewhere ? It doesn't have to be at the boiler, it could even be under the kitchen sink...
 
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Old 12-07-06, 12:20 PM
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The tankless has one pipe in and one out. No bypass. The out pipe does get hot but takes a while. It seems like the heat transfer between the boiler tank and the coil is slow. To the best of my knowledge there is no tempering valve at the boiler or any other obvious place. The hot water runs from the boiler, one branch leads to the kitchen sink, then another branch to downstairs bath, and the main stem up to 2nd floor bath.
 
 

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