I'm looking for a very efficient Oil Burner.


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Old 12-10-06, 03:08 PM
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I'm looking for a very efficient Oil Burner.

Hello,

I'm looking for some advice on Oil Burners, I have heard of one that is so efficient that you can vent it with PVC instead of exhausting out a chimney.

Does anyone have any information in this area?
I can't use gas it's not available in my area.

I'm looking to get this over the next few weeks.

Thanks,

Nordis,
 
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Old 12-10-06, 07:26 PM
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Oil/PVC

I don't know of any oil fired boilers you can vent with PVC pipe. There are several which can be direct vented thru a sidewall without use of any kind of power venter. Almost any boiler can be power vented thru a sidewall.
 
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Old 12-11-06, 01:10 AM
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Oil-Fired Condensing Boilers

Nordis:

The type of boiler that uses a pvc pipe to exhaust its condensate (mostly water & combustion byproducts) is known as an oil-fired combustion boiler.

These are relatively new to the U.S. market, because gas-fired condensation boilers are widely used here due to the high hydrogen content of the fuel & the low sulfur content of natural gas; this makes gas-fired boilers more compatible to condensation technology, where a much higher percentage of the fuel in the combustion chamber is burned, resulting in combustion efficiencies of ~95%, as opposed to ~85% for oil-fired and many gas-fired boilers.

Since #2 fuel oil, as sold in the U.S, has a lot of sulfur (2000 ppm), corrosive byproducts are produced that can corrode the boiler's combustion chamber, unless stainless steel & complex design is used; this has frustrated development of oil-fired consensing units in the U.S., while, in contrast, low-sulfur fuels are widely available in Europe (350 ppm now mandatory in Germany & Switzerland & mandatory in 2007 in the U.K.), allowing for oil-fired boilers with ~95% efficiency; the govts of these countries know how to support their oil heating industies & they thus are capturing a wide percentage of the world market.

However, low-sulfur fuels are now being carried by some suppliers in the U.S. & the scene is changing, but these units are still very expensive ($10k-$15k installed), where boilers with standard technology & ~85% efficiency cost ~$6k-$8k installed.

Viessmann with its Vitoplus 300 oil-fired condensing boiler is one of the few available in the U.S. (big $$$) that can handle #2 fuel oil; there is also a unit by Monitor (questionable) & imported units by Worcester-Bosch & HRM (Wallstar) from the U.K. & Grant from Ireland.

It would be hard to get a payback on your investment on any of these units, but as the U.S. intensifies its production & marketing of low-sulfur fuel, the price will come down as U.S. companies jump into the market.
 

Last edited by jack horner; 12-11-06 at 01:32 AM.
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Old 12-11-06, 12:26 PM
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Thank you for your reply.

Thanks a lot for your reponses to my question. They have been very helpful. I guess my next question is now.

What is direct vent?

I have a wood chimney framed in and I can go with some type of vent I'm told it would have to be L-Vent for an oil boiler.

I was hoping to use this wood chimney just for a wood burning or pellet stove and not my oil boiler just for the location of where it is on my house and I did not want to have my boiler in that location. But if I have to I guess I could.

I guess I just need some information on what is direct vent? Is direct vent L-Vent? If not does direct vent have to be above the roof line or can this just vent out a wall?

Thanks,

Nordis,
 
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Old 12-11-06, 08:45 PM
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Direct Vent

Direct venting goes thru a sidewall & not into a chimney. It does not need to exit the house above the roof line. Here is a link to one direct vent boiler.

http://www.crownboiler.com/products/res_oil/free_o.asp

If you want to read the entire installation manual, you can download it by clicking on the "manuals" button & selecting Freeport ODV.
 
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Old 12-11-06, 09:03 PM
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Go to http://www.peerlessboilers.com/ Check out the pinnacle
 
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Old 12-12-06, 01:25 PM
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direct vent

Be aware that directly vented oil burner can stain the outside walls on the house. You're better off using an existing chimney, but....

If you go with a super high efficiency oil boiler you're stack temps will be considerably lower, and that may require a stainless steel chimney liner in your existing flue...

Pete
 
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Old 12-12-06, 08:18 PM
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Red face Peerless Pinnacle

Forgot about the Pinnacle & it being a condensing boiler. Betcha that baby carries a pretty price tag.
 
 

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