pic of new install


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Old 12-22-06, 06:14 AM
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pic of new install

any comments would be appreciated
 
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Old 12-22-06, 09:09 AM
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Can you take a step back to show more of the near-boiler piping?
 
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Old 12-22-06, 09:38 AM
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Pipe that PRV!

There are many ways to make that PRV pop, bypass the feed, somebody closes that valve to the compression tank etc. You don't want water spraying on the electrics or on people. Pipe it to within 6" of the floor and don't leave any threads on the bottom of the pipe.

A little black paint would make the old fittings look new.

Nice work on the dope... very neat and tidy. Did you use tape under the dope?

You may wish to remove the valve handle on the expansion tank and then just zip-tie it there so you know where it is when you need it.
 
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Old 12-23-06, 05:30 AM
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yep tape under dope,i can take the handle off,no biggie just me an wifey here,thanks for the comments
 

Last edited by DIYaddict; 12-23-06 at 08:49 AM. Reason: quote removed as it's not necessary
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Old 12-23-06, 08:25 AM
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Without seeing more of the near-boiler piping, it's hard to see whether you are pumping towards the expansion tank or away from it. Manufacturers generally specify pumping on the supply side and away from the expansion tank, but some allow (or even require for pressure proving switches on some boilers) pumping on the return so long as the expansion tank is upstream of the circ inlet.
 
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Old 12-24-06, 07:41 AM
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Originally Posted by xiphias
Without seeing more of the near-boiler piping, it's hard to see whether you are pumping towards the expansion tank or away from it. Manufacturers generally specify pumping on the supply side and away from the expansion tank, but some allow (or even require for pressure proving switches on some boilers) pumping on the return so long as the expansion tank is upstream of the circ inlet.
heres a few more pics
[IMG]http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r156/lenny52/100_0366.jpg[/IMG]
 
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Old 12-27-06, 08:46 AM
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Are you aware?

I can't read the #s on the nameplate in your pictures but there is a recall on some Crown boilers. I believe it only involves conversion to LP kits but you might want to check it out at http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PREREL/prhtml07/07063.html

I was wrong about it being LP related. I did some checking on HeatingHelp.com and apparently it has to do with lack of combustion air/venting issues. It should be checked out by a pro if there's any questions. You do have a CO detector in the house, right? As far as I know it's more of an improper installation issue than a mistake by the manufacturer. They're just very conscientious, I guess.
 

Last edited by bodhisatva; 12-27-06 at 09:01 AM.
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Old 12-27-06, 11:40 AM
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The piping layout looks pretty funky. Does it work OK?
 
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Old 12-29-06, 03:27 AM
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Wink

oh yea it works fine,th e piping was all over the place before install,i just moved every thing to one location,for better servicing,ya dig!
 
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Old 12-30-06, 07:37 AM
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Talking Automatic air elimination, circulator location?

No air scoop or spirovent? Those Taco 400 Hyvents are good, but location is interesting. Do you have bleeders on the radiators? At least you have purge tee's. having the circulator on the return is ok, unless you have a little air in the system, then it could easily get air bound. I prefer to see it on the supply. More isolation valves would be good. Webstone and B&G make great isolation flanges for the circulator. Also, isolation valves on either side of the water feeder would be a plus. Definately should slap a drip tube on the relief valve. I know someone who got sued because the customer got second degree burns a few inches below his belt buckle, if you know what I mean, because no drip tube was installed. Is that where the Mfg. reccomended putting the relief valve? Usually it is piped right into the boiler. Good Luck!
 
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Old 12-30-06, 03:47 PM
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Smile

if you look real close ive got 2 spiro air vents installed,this boiler has natrual draft,like i say its worked good so far, im up here or down here depending where you guys are at.in providence rhode island.its been in the low 20s at nite and that baby is toasty.
 
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Old 01-01-07, 01:08 AM
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Unhappy Air elimination

Originally Posted by refer guy
if you look real close ive got 2 spiro air vents installed,this boiler has natrual draft,like i say its worked good so far, im up here or down here depending where you guys are at.in providence rhode island.its been in the low 20s at nite and that baby is toasty.
Those are actually Taco 400 Hyvents. Check out spirovents at:
http://www.spirotherm.com/air/
I'm sure you purged enough air out through the purge tee and it works, but what would happen if air got into the system? Why would the air want to go into the vents? This is what an air scoop looks like:
http://masterplumber.net/images/Air_Scoop.JPG
 
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Old 01-01-07, 08:26 AM
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ok i see what you mean,my other boiler didnt have an air scoop neither,and its been in the house for 22years,go figure,but i will look into the air scoop thingy thanks.
 
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Old 01-01-07, 10:49 AM
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Smile air scoops

Air scoops work pretty good and are cheaper. Spirovents work very good, but are a bit more expensive.
 
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Old 01-01-07, 12:00 PM
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Some manufacturers recommend a minimum of 18" of straight pipe upstream of the air scoop, so keep that in mind when doing the piping. I notice that "master plumber" didn't do that...

I don't believe the spirovent has that requirement, nor do the B&G EAS models.

-
 
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Old 01-02-07, 01:51 AM
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Post read the instructions!

The last time I read the installation instructions for an air scoop, it said 12" of straight pipe before the air scoop so that the air has a chance to rise to the top of the pipe. Spirovents do not require any because they trap the air bubbles differently. There is a new spirovent that mounts on the vertical pipe instead of the horizontal, but no-one seems to have them in stock. I see "proffessionals" make these mistakes all the time. I saw a video online where the "technician" told the customer that they should flush the LWCO (Low Water Cut-Off) once or twice a heating season. If you read the instructions that come with it though, it says it should be flushed weekly during the heating season, and monthly during the summer. Unfortunately too many people "don't need no stinking instructions". They are a pro and they know it!
 
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Old 01-02-07, 03:36 PM
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well, again thank you all for your advice,i will look into that air scoop,might have to do some rearranging on the piping but no biggie,i cant understand why it never was installed.the other boiler was in this house for 22 years,oh well go figure.
 
 

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