Fresh Air Intake on Buderus

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Old 12-28-06, 04:35 PM
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Fresh Air Intake on Buderus

I just had a new Buderus Boiler installed this summer with a Beckett burner. It came with a nice enclosure around the burner which I was told was for cutting down the noise. The room that the boiler is in is small so I wanted to pipe something in from outside. My idea is to run a piece of 4" PVC outside into a knockout on top of this enclosure. My question is can I just pipe this directly into this knockout or should I put a tee and a damper? Also should I put a second 4" in and stub it a foot off of the ground? Any help is much appreciated. Thanks, Chris
 
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Old 12-28-06, 07:03 PM
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Cold Trap

You might just want to pipe it down to near the burner and then terminate the end into a bucket. The bucket will help form a cold trap to keep your heat from rising up the old air tube... well slow it down at least.
 
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Old 12-28-06, 07:26 PM
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Look in the paperwork that came with the burner. I looked for through the boiler installation booklet but sonce it is available with 3 different choices of burner, they don't mention the Beckett air box. I'm sure I saw it somewhere as I just finished a Buderus installation today and remember seeing the way to connect outside air to the burner box. It is a good idea and saves energy in the home.

Ken
 
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Old 12-28-06, 07:31 PM
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Do you or do you not have adequate combustion air? If not, then this is likely a code violation and you need to start a dialogue with your installer or the local authority having jurisdiction (plumbing inspector, or whoever).

In most install manuals there is a long section (largely reprinted from the National Fuel Gas Code) on determining the adequacy of combustion air, and how to mitigate if it is insufficient.

If on the other hand you are just adding air to a room to keep it cooler, then this might not be an issue.

Also, oil might have different combustion air requirements with which I'm not familiar. However, oil-fired appliances also produce carbon monoxide so please check your install manual to make sure you are ok.
 
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Old 12-28-06, 08:53 PM
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Would that be an AFG Beckett or an NX Beckett?
 
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Old 12-28-06, 10:01 PM
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Originally Posted by Hello View Post
Would that be an AFG Beckett or an NX Beckett?
It is a Beckett AFG burner.
 
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Old 12-29-06, 11:21 AM
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The problem with bringing outside air into the cover is that is not sealed from the room before air will come down the pipe the pressure in the room will have to be lower than the outside pressure. As you lower the pressure of the room you will lose the draft in the chimney first, then possibly introduce combustion gasses into the space.

The correct solutions are to install the AFG air boot to bring air directly into the burner (most sound from the burner is from air intake anyway), or to use a fan in a can to bring in the correct amount of combustion air, or to Cut two holes into the boiler room, each being 1square inch for every 1000 BTU of input.
 
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Old 12-29-06, 11:31 AM
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I don't think that you will have problems if you bring air into the air box on the burner. If it was me, I would probably block off the slots on the box and force the burner to get its air through the pipe. Keep in mind that you will have some limitations on length and number of elbows. Ans that you will have to adjust the CO2 with the cover in place. So you will need to check combustion, remove the cover and make an adjustment, put the cover back on and check combustion again until you get it set right. We use the Energy Kinetics boiler and it has a box around the burner. There are no openings in the box except where the air pipe enters. It works great. The limitations on that system which is max fired at 1.00 gph are 30 feet of 2" PVC pipe and 4 elbows. Use your judgement and common sense too.

Ken
 
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Old 12-30-06, 04:22 AM
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You could use PVC to get it into the room, but I wouldn't connect PVC to the burner. The burner is attached to the clean-out door which will have to swing open when you have it serviced. If you could go from PVC to something flexible, that would be better. Also, putting some sort of damper inline would help prevent cold air from coming in when the boiler isn't running. Trapping it would help too. You could do this by running the pipe to the floor, and back up to the ceiling. Make sure the outlet isn't near anything that might freeze. If you have a draft regulator, it would probbably be best to put it near it. That way the cold air would be more likely to go out instead of the room air. Another option is to make sure that you can use room air if a vent from the rest of the house, or a big enough gap under the door is provided. Which model do you have? The G115/3?
 
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Old 12-30-06, 04:31 AM
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Originally Posted by xiphias View Post
oil-fired appliances also produce carbon monoxide .
Any Oil, Natural Gas, Propane, Wood, Coal, etc... appliances can produce CO (carbon monoxide) if not provided with adequate combustion air. How is the boiler vented? Chimney, Power venter, balanced flue, etc...? It could make a difference. I prefer the Riello burners on the Buderus boilers.
 
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