Drain Faucet of Gas Boiler


  #1  
Old 01-15-07, 01:12 PM
C
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 15
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Red face Drain Faucet of Gas Boiler

Could anybody please give an advice that If the drain faucet of my 2 zone heating system's is leaking a little bit (1 tiny drop in 15 sec.) and I put a brass cap with a rubber seal on the faucet,,, Does this cure will take care of the the dripping problem Or it'll make it worse in future? What should I do to replace the drain faucet? Please explain step by step.
Is it gonna be a really big problem in future?

Thanks indeed
 
  #2  
Old 01-15-07, 01:26 PM
Ed Imeduc's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Mountain Williams Missouri
Posts: 17,505
Upvotes: 0
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
Wink

Have you tried to open it for a short time then close it. will this stop the leak. Is the psi on the boiler running high ?
 
  #3  
Old 01-15-07, 01:27 PM
Who's Avatar
Who
Who is offline
Member
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: San Jose
Posts: 2,066
Upvotes: 0
Received 2 Upvotes on 1 Post
Some valves can be tightened to stop this without removing anything. Can your describe the drain valve?

BTW, having those little drain caps twisted on tight is a really good idea to keep the small DIYers of the future from hurting the themselves or the equipment when they get inquisitive.
 
  #4  
Old 01-15-07, 03:12 PM
C
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 15
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
The PSI pressure stays the same but it never stop leaking. Some times when the system starts circulating hot water that its slows down leaking but again start once hot water stop circulating the pipes. Now I've capped it so I'm good for a while (I hope). I can't turn the valve on wither side - at least not with hands. I didn't tried to force it with a wrench. Its not rusty but stuck very hard.

Do you see any problem with this capping that can hurt the whole system? I capped only the top ending part of the faucet with a cap to stop the leak.

Can anybody explains me how to drain out and flush the whole system in summer? Is there any direct link for furnace boiler picture illustrated detailed maintenance website?

Thanks
 
  #5  
Old 01-15-07, 03:21 PM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 19,710
Upvotes: 0
Received 8 Upvotes on 6 Posts
>>cadijazz...The PSI pressure stays ...

But, what _IS_ the pressure ???

...Can anybody explains me how to drain out and flush the whole system in summer? ...

You don't need or even want to do this. It's not necessary, and can create more problems than you bargain for.
 
  #6  
Old 01-15-07, 04:18 PM
Who's Avatar
Who
Who is offline
Member
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: San Jose
Posts: 2,066
Upvotes: 0
Received 2 Upvotes on 1 Post
Like NJ T says... don't!

Introducing fresh water to your system also introduces oxygen. You don't want any new oxygen in there - it'll rust things out. The old dead water you have in there works best.
 
  #7  
Old 01-16-07, 01:39 PM
F
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 16,321
Received 38 Upvotes on 30 Posts
Putting the cap on the valve outlet won't hurt a thing. I think it is a good idea to always cap such valves to prevent a serious problem if the valve is accidentally opened.

You should replace this valve come summer. Post back then and someone will give you the instructions on how to do so.
 
  #8  
Old 01-17-07, 02:28 PM
C
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 15
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
One of our neighbors told me to flush the system every summer so that all the rust and sediments from the boiled water flushes out. Is it worth to flush the system every year in summer? Does these kind of boilers need yearly maintenance of cleaning and adjustments. This unit got serviced January '06 (don't know the details but it got serviced) Ain't it worth to clean the baseboard inside the furnace area to get rid of rust and sediments?

This boiler also has a water filler/valve thing. Its red in color and it adds water in the system if water level inside the pipes get lower. So how this addition of water doesn't make any problem? I guess when it dripped the water out from the faucet (which I already fixed with a cap) triggered this Red valve to push some water inside the pipes! What do you think? BTW, pipes are copper made.

System pressure is always under 10 PSI in cold state. 15-18 PSI in hot circulating state.
 
  #9  
Old 01-17-07, 02:34 PM
Who's Avatar
Who
Who is offline
Member
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: San Jose
Posts: 2,066
Upvotes: 0
Received 2 Upvotes on 1 Post
See post #5 and #6. Your neighbor couldn't be more wrong. Leave the water be.

Any rust comes from adding "New" water. The new water comes with little oxygen bubbles. Steel + water + oxygen = rust. Please try and keep the oxygen out.
 
  #10  
Old 01-17-07, 07:33 PM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 19,710
Upvotes: 0
Received 8 Upvotes on 6 Posts
NO... do NOT flush the system every year. Like WHO said, you bring O2 into the system and it will rust . If your neighbor has a lot of rust in his system it is BECAUSE he flushes it each year. Don't listen to your neighbor!

The small amount of "make-up water" that is added by that red thing is TINY in comparison to the total water. After the water is heated and circulated, all the oxygen in the water is driven out of the water, and removed by the automatic air vents in the system. The red thing (AUTOMATIC WATER FEED AND PRESSURE REDUCING VALVE) will only add water when water is lost from the system. Water should not be lost from the system unless there is a leak.

JUST DON'T DO IT!

The system SHOULD BE serviced every year, before the heating season starts. Service should include changing the oil filter, changing the nozzle, setting the electrodes, fuel pump pressure should be checked and adjusted if necessary, cleaning the firebox and heat exchanger of ash and soot, checking and possibly cleaning the chimney and flue pipe. Testing combustion with instruments, and adjusting the burner for proper operation. The safety relief valve and system pressure should be checked.

Did I forget anything ?

Oh yeah, did I mention that there is NO REASON to flush and change the water!

The pipes may be made of copper, but the boiler itself and probably the system circulating pump are made out of cast iron, and they will rust.

One last thing. DON'T CHANGE THE WATER!
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: