radiator valve spitting water

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  #1  
Old 02-04-07, 06:06 PM
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radiator valve spitting water

As some of you might know, i just installed a new boiler ...i also replaced all the radiator valves with varivalves...now i have noticed that one of the radiator valves is spitting water ...water literally gushes out through the opening in the valve...there is no leak though... i get a bucket full of water in 24 hrs... i also noticed loud thuds here and there....

the guy who instaled boiler suggested to elevate the radiator...he thinks the radiator is at a lower level than rest of the floor


Any ideas?
 
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  #2  
Old 02-04-07, 06:44 PM
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My first idea is that your (new) vent valve ( I assume that is what you say is spitting) is defective.

My next idea is that the radiator is either level or else is sloping downward away from the steam pipe, that is, the side with the vent valve, opposite from where the steam enters, is lower than the steam inlet side. One pipe steam systems need to have the radiator SLIGHTLY sloping downward towards the steam pipe to allow the condensate to properly drain.
 
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Old 02-04-07, 07:23 PM
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i tried another new valve already...still have same problem...your 2nd idea is possiblity... i dont recall i had this problem with the old valve

I had a GC in the house today when we heard those load thuds together..he said he had a simialr problem in his house..he said there was too much water in the system...he said the noise disappeared once he drained some water from the system...is it possible...since i have an automatic water feeder installed..is it possible that the boiler guy may not have programmed it properly?

Originally Posted by furd View Post
My first idea is that your (new) vent valve ( I assume that is what you say is spitting) is defective.

My next idea is that the radiator is either level or else is sloping downward away from the steam pipe, that is, the side with the vent valve, opposite from where the steam enters, is lower than the steam inlet side. One pipe steam systems need to have the radiator SLIGHTLY sloping downward towards the steam pipe to allow the condensate to properly drain.
 
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Old 02-04-07, 07:35 PM
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Yes, it is certainly possible that the water feeder is incorrectly controlling the water level. The level in the boiler should be about 1/2 way in the sight glass. It should be "relatively" stable although a bit of movement is normal.

When you had your boiler replaced did the contractor also replace the main air vent valve on the main distibution piping?


Loud "thuds" usually come from water hammer or steam and condensate colliding. The pitch, or slope, of the piping must be gentle and always down towards the boiler. Too much pitch can be as bad as not enough.
 
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Old 02-04-07, 09:00 PM
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water level in the sight glass thing is about 2/3rds up..

i dont believe he replaced main vent..

the pitch is certainly towards the boiler but it is kinda steeper than previously...I remember the contractor mentioning the increased pitch when he was installing the boiler but he said it was actually a good thing

I guess i have to give him a call...

what is a waterhammer?

I guess I will have to give the contractor a call..

Originally Posted by furd View Post
Yes, it is certainly possible that the water feeder is incorrectly controlling the water level. The level in the boiler should be about 1/2 way in the sight glass. It should be "relatively" stable although a bit of movement is normal.

When you had your boiler replaced did the contractor also replace the main air vent valve on the main distibution piping?
Loud "thuds" usually come from water hammer or steam and condensate colliding. The pitch, or slope, of the piping must be gentle and always down towards the boiler. Too much pitch can be as bad as not enough.
 

Last edited by christy123; 02-04-07 at 09:25 PM.
  #6  
Old 02-04-07, 11:34 PM
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Water hammer is when the steam "picks up" a slug of water, carries it down the pipe until the water slams into a fitting. It can be anything from a thud to a sharp crack to as much as actually breaking the fitting. In low-pressure residential steam heating the pipes must GENTLY slope back to the boiler to ensure that the inside diameter of the pipe is never more than about 1/3 up from the bottom of the pipe full of condensed water. You want that condensate to flow easily back to the boiler under the steam that is flowing to the radiators.

Changing the pitch (slope) of pipes in a steam system when replacing a boiler will often cause problems where they did not exist with the old boiler.


On the radiator that has the spitting vent valve...try driving small wedges under the feet opposite from the steam pipe. Just a bit, no more than a half-bubble on a two-foot long level placed on top of the radiator.


Two-thirds of a glass of water may be a bit high. I am not familiar with small, modern boilers used in residential steam systems so perhaps Grady can answer that question.

What pressure does the boiler usually operate at?
 
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Old 02-05-07, 03:58 PM
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Radiator spitting water

Hi-- First, just so you know-- I know absolutely nothing about boilers except for my own (bad) experience these past few months-- after having a new steam boiler installed.

Is the water coming out of the radiator dirty and rusty looking by any chance? And does the water in the site glass on the furnace also look dirty/rusty? Did your installer happen to put a cleaner in the boiler when he installed it? On Thanksgiving Day (with a houseful of people) the vent on my living room radiator started pouring out water, plus the pipes were banging like crazy. Later on the radiator on our porch started doing the same thing. Turns out it was all caused by dirty/rusty water in the boiler. I had other problems-- and stil have them, but once the boiler was flushed, and clean water was added, we no longer had the banging and the leaking radiators.

Again, I don't know anything about boilers except my own bad experience-- but I hate the thought of anyone else having to put up with the banging etc that I put up with for weeks before the solution was found-- and it was such an easy solution to this particular problem. I would love to hear yours is also an easy fix. Good Luck!
 

Last edited by Mindy74; 02-05-07 at 04:02 PM. Reason: To correct something I said
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Old 02-06-07, 08:19 PM
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I have separate pipe that comes off the steam pipe ( I have single pipe system) about 6 ft from the boiler carrying condensate....the pitch of this pipe isnt that bad...

the guy came yesterday...he put a piece of wood ( hardwood floor piece) under the radiator...water doesnt come out of the valve anymore...i realized that the floor has sort of sunk a little bit near this radiator

I still hear the noises here and there though!



Originally Posted by furd View Post
Water hammer is when the steam "picks up" a slug of water, carries it down the pipe until the water slams into a fitting. It can be anything from a thud to a sharp crack to as much as actually breaking the fitting. In low-pressure residential steam heating the pipes must GENTLY slope back to the boiler to ensure that the inside diameter of the pipe is never more than about 1/3 up from the bottom of the pipe full of condensed water. You want that condensate to flow easily back to the boiler under the steam that is flowing to the radiators.

Changing the pitch (slope) of pipes in a steam system when replacing a boiler will often cause problems where they did not exist with the old boiler.


On the radiator that has the spitting vent valve...try driving small wedges under the feet opposite from the steam pipe. Just a bit, no more than a half-bubble on a two-foot long level placed on top of the radiator.


Two-thirds of a glass of water may be a bit high. I am not familiar with small, modern boilers used in residential steam systems so perhaps Grady can answer that question.

What pressure does the boiler usually operate at?
 
  #9  
Old 02-06-07, 08:24 PM
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He didnt clean the system.

I have been meticulously flushing the boiler almost everyday ever since it was installed 3 weeks ago. initial run of the water is black but then it clears up... the glass is already rusted but the water is clear


Originally Posted by Mindy74 View Post
Hi-- First, just so you know-- I know absolutely nothing about boilers except for my own (bad) experience these past few months-- after having a new steam boiler installed.

Is the water coming out of the radiator dirty and rusty looking by any chance? And does the water in the site glass on the furnace also look dirty/rusty? Did your installer happen to put a cleaner in the boiler when he installed it? On Thanksgiving Day (with a houseful of people) the vent on my living room radiator started pouring out water, plus the pipes were banging like crazy. Later on the radiator on our porch started doing the same thing. Turns out it was all caused by dirty/rusty water in the boiler. I had other problems-- and stil have them, but once the boiler was flushed, and clean water was added, we no longer had the banging and the leaking radiators.

Again, I don't know anything about boilers except my own bad experience-- but I hate the thought of anyone else having to put up with the banging etc that I put up with for weeks before the solution was found-- and it was such an easy solution to this particular problem. I would love to hear yours is also an easy fix. Good Luck!
 
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