A Picture may be worth a Thousand Words!

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  #1  
Old 02-12-07, 09:36 AM
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A Picture may be worth a Thousand Words!

Does anyone want to share some pictures of a 2 or 3 zone set up on their hot water- oil boiler, I am interested in zone valves, 1 2 and 3 ciculator set ups and pressure differential valve installations. Also what exactly is meant by setting up 3 circulators in parallel? (Beside each other?) thanks
 
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  #2  
Old 02-12-07, 06:12 PM
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Circulators

In parallel usually means in case of failure, you could switch to a back up circulator. This is frequently done in commercial/industrial applications but rarely in residential.
 
  #3  
Old 02-13-07, 02:35 PM
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here are few pics of my boiler. I finished this project a few month ago as some of you may remember. It was my first HW boiler project.
So far: 2 zones (1-heat, 1-indirect) and outdoor reset. Adding one more heating zone next summer.

http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y95/zaq_944/boiler/CIMG0183.jpg
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y95/zaq_944/boiler/CIMG0181.jpg
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y95/zaq_944/boiler/CIMG0179.jpg
 

Last edited by zaq123; 02-13-07 at 04:47 PM.
  #4  
Old 02-13-07, 04:15 PM
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Here's mine:
http://i7.************/40k4r3p.jpg
http://i15.************/2hz1t9c.jpg
 

Last edited by annoyingnoiseee; 02-13-07 at 04:16 PM. Reason: Wrong URLS
  #5  
Old 02-13-07, 06:46 PM
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zac, i like the way you did things on the domestic side of your indirect
 
  #6  
Old 02-13-07, 11:56 PM
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lovely boilers

zaq123 i like the extra valves you put in...so troubleshooting/repair wud be a breeze for u.

annoyingnoiseee: u got an airpurger? that's neat i need one of those!

i'll post mine's soon. it's a natural gas FHW boiler with 3 zones with no airpurger =(

u guyz have no idea wat i have to go thru sometimes to purge air out of my system. sometimes i just end up putting brand new water in there instead which is a waste.
 
  #7  
Old 02-14-07, 12:16 AM
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my boiler

http://img241.imageshack.us/my.php?image=12cj3.jpg
http://img244.imageshack.us/my.php?image=11cd0.jpg
http://img388.imageshack.us/my.php?image=13tc8.jpg
http://img376.imageshack.us/my.php?image=14tt5.jpg

she's a beauty isnt she? sometimes shes a long-winded talker with no air purger.
 

Last edited by kamrandiaz; 02-14-07 at 01:20 AM.
  #8  
Old 02-14-07, 04:18 AM
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Originally Posted by kamrandiaz View Post

she's a beauty isnt she? sometimes shes a long-winded talker with no air purger.
Thanks for good words guys. I run my indirect at 135 F with mixing valve set at 118 F. My 4 y.o. likes to play with water and now I have a peace of mind that he can't scald himself and that there is no bacteria can grow in the tank at 135F.

Kamrandiaz, I would get rid of that black T fitting and seriously consider Spirovent. It's best air eliminator out there IMHO

http://www.pexsupply.com/categories.asp?cID=311&brandid=
 

Last edited by zaq123; 02-15-07 at 09:42 AM.
  #9  
Old 02-14-07, 07:51 AM
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spirovent

Originally Posted by zaq123 View Post
Kamrandiaz, I would get rid of that black T fitting and seriously consider Spirovent. It's best air eliminator out there IMHO

http://www.pexsupply.com/categories.asp?cID=311&brandid=
zaq123 that's an excellent suggestion, looks like that spirovent wud solve all my airbubble problems but another DIY'er informed me I already have an air-vent built into my furnace and I see it. It just needs replacing because it's not doing its job correctly. But this spirovent looks like it takes out air from the system automatically on demand or am i mistaken? the vent i have ontop of my boiler is not auto.

Sooner or later I'm gona probably replace this furnace with a higher AFUE rating 90+ when the time comes and I'll keep your idea in mind along with your project's pics...I was very impressed. Grady informed me not to trust those Aluminum-based wall hung furnaces who claim high AFUE, they don't last long. Cast Iron furnaces are still the best and are garaunteed to last a looong time.

zaq123 what's the AFUE rating on your new system?
What wud u recommend?

Im currently running a 150,000 btu input and 120,000 btu output boiler. So mine is around 80% AFUE right? I guess that's good enough for now.
 
  #10  
Old 02-14-07, 05:05 PM
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I would replace that existing vent and still put some kind of air scoop instead of that black T. Spirovent is very nice, I would definitely consider installing it unless you are replacing your boiler in the near future.
I have Buderus G115/21 with Riello F40 oil burner
http://buderus.net/Default.aspx?tabid=873&cid=1&pid=&spid=23&ctitle=residential&performance=1

check your PM
 

Last edited by zaq123; 02-14-07 at 05:29 PM.
  #11  
Old 02-22-07, 09:54 AM
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I found a picture of one of the boiler rooms I used to be responsible for.

http://img122.imageshack.us/my.php?image=1052boilerroomeh2.jpg

This picture was taken in 1957 and shows the two original boilers. By the time I got there the plant had been increased considerably and there were a total of five boilers. The two original boilers, along with a third added in 1959 were 16 million BTU/hour each and the two additional boilers added in 1964 and 1965 were 25 million BTU/hour each for a total capacity of 98 million BTU/hour (98,000,000 BTU/hour). The total volume of water was in excess of 80,000 gallons.

This was a "high-temperature" hot water heating system. Design parameters were 315 degrees F. and 150 psi. We ran 300 degrees in the winter and between 250 and 275 degrees the rest of the time. There were several absorbtion chillers on this system that used the hot water to produce chilled water for cooling purposes.

The larger boilers held about 3700 gallons each and the smaller ones about 2800 gallons. The expansion tank was the intermix point for the primary/secondary loops and at operating level held about 3,000 gallons. The primary pumps (one for each boiler) were rated at 900 gallons-per-minute each and the secondary pumps were of varying sizes.
 
  #12  
Old 02-22-07, 02:43 PM
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That's a goodern furd!

That's the expansion tank up there on the mezzanine ? and the primary pumps below that? or ??
 
  #13  
Old 02-22-07, 05:36 PM
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Wink

Great picture Furd!
I love the "big stuff" like that! Sorry to go off on a tangent here but are those Cleaver Brooks boilers? What kind of facility did they serve? Are they still in operation? Gas, oil, or combination?
I used to be involved with maintaining a 300 HP Kewaunee gas fired scotch boiler for heating in a large nursing home, along with a 60 HP Cleaver Brooks. Boy, those (especially the Kewaunee) would really rock the house when they fired up!
I miss the big stuff...
Keep it coming!

Edit- After looking more closely, I can see that they are indeed CB boilers with gas/oil trim.
 

Last edited by Andrew; 02-22-07 at 06:50 PM.
  #14  
Old 02-22-07, 06:45 PM
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Yes, that is the expansion tank on the mezzanine. After the additional boilers were installed they added an additional tank on top of that one, connected to the two flanged nozzles near the ends. Normal water level in the tank was about five feet up from the bottom. We ran a nitrogen blanket on the top to preclude oxygen corrosion, about 70 to 90 psi depending on the operating temperature.

The pumps below the expansion tank ore the secondary loop pumps, the primary pumps are behind (left side of picture) the boilers.


Cleaver Brooks model LR boilers rated at 500 horsepower. The shell is about 8 feet in diameter and about 20 feet long. They are 4-pass boilers and the fire tubes are 3 inch diameter by 16 feet long. They were originally oil-fired only with PS 400 (bunker) oil but later modified to burn natural gas as the primary fuel with Diesel oil as the standby fuel. The oil burners were rotary cup models. They had propane pilots that were converted to natural gas after a couple of deaths at a different facility that was using propane.

Alas, the plant no longer exists. After the Nisqually earthquake of February 28, 2001, one of the major buildings that this plant served was damaged so badly that it was torn down. Other buildings that it served were closed and eventually torn down both before and after the earthquake. Most of the load was space heating but it did have some process load including a few paint booths, reproduction equipment and a large cafeteria.
 
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