Piping Layout

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Old 02-26-07, 07:02 PM
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Piping Layout

Hi all. I have made a piping layout of how I want to pipe my boiler. I have posted it on photobucket. If somebody could take a look at it and let me know if there is anything wrong I would appreciate it.

http://i168.photobucket.com/albums/u179/jetmx/BoilerPiping.jpg
 
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Old 02-26-07, 07:33 PM
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It looks pretty good, although you need a ball valve on the by-pass to regulate the mixing of supply and return water temp.
 
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Old 02-26-07, 08:35 PM
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Originally Posted by sgthvac View Post
It looks pretty good, although you need a ball valve on the by-pass to regulate the mixing of supply and return water temp.
I guess thats what the circuit setter does. I may just use a regular ball valve.
 
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Old 02-28-07, 12:54 AM
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No expansion tank problem ???
On a serious note, should I put the ball valve on the return at the boiler above or below the bypass tap?
 
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Old 02-28-07, 04:57 AM
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Smile

How are you going to purge it? You should add a boiler drain & Tee on the return just before the ball valve to act as a purge station. The fish would like that.
 
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Old 02-28-07, 07:55 AM
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Suggestions

Stick a union on the supply and the return to facilitate boiler removal or swap.

Move the drain and ball valve on the supply up to the elbow so that when you purge, you go through the whole system, and *through the boiler* before exiting. Doesn't have to be at the elbow, but the closer you reasonably get the purge exit point to the fast-fill introduction point, the more completely you remove any air during a purge.

Put a ball valve between the air eliminator (suggest Spirovent or Taco 4900 for that) and the expansion tank to faciliate an ET swap.

Consider ball valves and drains on each zone (e.g., just before the return manifold) so you can purge and drain individual zones rather than the whole system.

Do a proper head loss and flow rate calcuation to ensure that you size the circulator properly (or if you go with a Grundfos 15-58, pick the right speed). Similarly, do a proper heat load calculation to size the headers for flow and BTU needs.

Consider putting the future hot water as the first takeoff on the manifold. Tradition more than anything, but it also keeps the flow path to the indirect as short an uninterrupted as possible.

Consider your controls. IMHO, a simple way to control this system with truly minimal wiring hassle would be a Taco ZVC406-EXP. Add the PC-700 outdoor reset control. When you add the indirect, get the PC600 post-purge card and the PC605 priority protection card. They plug right in and you're off to the races. I almost used this on my system, but decided to go with all circs and a tekmar 260 instead (but I only have two heating zones and an indirect -- I would not hang 6 circs in my basement if I could avoid it). The ZVC allows DHW priority with zone valves, which the tekmar does not.

For the indirect, get a high Cv, fast-response zone valve. Honeywell. Whatever you do, don't use a Taco 570. Their reaction time is too long for an indirect. Been there, done that.

Alternatively, consider a tekmar 260 instead of the PC700/600/605 (cost would probably end up close to the same). To get indirect priority with a tekmar, however, you'd have to put a circ on the indirect. If you do that, then you'd have to rearrange the piping a bit to get the indirect and the space heating circs on their own takeoffs so you aren't pumping in series on a DHW call.

What kind of boiler is this going to be? What is the intent of the bypass?
 
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Old 02-28-07, 11:28 AM
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Originally Posted by xiphias View Post
What kind of boiler is this going to be? What is the intent of the bypass?
Heat loss is not complete yet so I do not know what size boiler. I want to get the Burnam series 2. I have a high volume of water. The basement has 5 old style cast iron rads. The ground level and upstairs has baseboard. Currently there are only 2 zones, the basement and the rest of the house. Both have the 1 1/4" mono loop (this will be changed to supply and return) that run the perimeter of the house. From what I have been reading it is best to install the bypass loop to raise the temp of the water returning back to the boiler.

Thanks for the replies. I am just getting everything in perspective before I start buying.
 
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Old 02-28-07, 02:31 PM
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I had a Series 2. Very good, reliable boiler.

Definitely figure up your heat loss and see what kind of water temps you will need to run.

If you really want to go nuts, you could pipe it primary/secondary and do mixing reset for the different zones based on their temp needs. This would avoid the potential conflict of hot water needed for baseboard and cooler water needed for the CI rads. Or just let the thermostats handle it and bounce around setpoint in the rad rooms while running near constant circulation in the baseboard.

Just thinking out loud here.
 
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