servicing a Honeywell Synchron zone valve

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Old 02-26-07, 07:14 PM
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servicing a Honeywell Synchron zone valve

I have 2 Honeywell Synchron zone valves #V8043F that are dripping water. They seem to be dripping from the sleeve that guides the shaft that the powerhead attaches to.
My questions:
1) are these servicable? O-rings or what?
2) does this place of leaking mean the valve assembly needs to be replaced?
3) how does a DIYer get the service parts?

I am new to this board. I appreciate your help
 
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Old 02-26-07, 07:32 PM
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Leaking zone valves

Bad news, Scoot. Those parts, as far as I know, are not availabe. You would have to replace the valves.
 
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Old 02-26-07, 07:49 PM
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Not the answer that I was hoping for, but much faster than I was hoping for.
Thanks
 
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Old 02-26-07, 07:54 PM
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Zone Valves

All Honeywell valves have a 4 digit number after the letter. It can make a difference. You got lucky on the timing of your question. Some luck is better than none.
 
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Old 02-26-07, 08:01 PM
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There is a repair kit available. It is called a conversion kit because it contains parts that convert the old style (non removable head) valve to the new style. I can find a honeywell part number tomorrow if you need it. I bought 6 last year to repair some damaged valves. They will cost less and make the repair relatively painless if you don't have to solder the new ones in.

Ken

http://www.honeywell.com.pl/pdf/automatyka_domow/zawory_do_instalacji_co/V4043_44_E.pdf

page 13 shows the part and part number
 

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Old 02-26-07, 08:03 PM
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The full number is V8043F 1036.
These seem fairly common.
Can I leave the sweat-in part in-line, and replace the "guts" of the valve and actuator, or do I have to un-sweat and replace the whole deal?
thanks for your help
 
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Old 02-26-07, 08:08 PM
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V8043

If you buy new valves (usually cheaper than just the power head), you can leave the body in place & just replace the guts I think. Ken does more zone valves than I so he probably knows for sure.
 
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Old 02-26-07, 08:21 PM
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With my leak coming from the stem area, then would replacing the power head fix the problem?
I am assuming that I will need to drain down the system, pull the old power head, remove the old valve leaving the sweat in parts in place, install new valve parts, attach new power head, fill system, smile since everything worked perfectly the first time?

I am sorry if it sounds like I am repeating my earlier post, I just want to know what I am up against...to sweat or not to sweat, that is the question.
 
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Old 02-27-07, 05:36 AM
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Replacing the power head will not solve the problem. You need the parts that seal the water and the power head is basically just the motor and gear drive. Grady's idea is not bad either. You would find those valves more readily if you were looking for the whole thing. Then you could use everything but the body and NOT have to solder them in the system. Your description of the procedure was correct. You may even get away without draining the whole system if you can isolate the returns and remove pressure from the boiler. Just be careful with the hot water and anything that could be damaged by any unexpected water flow.

Ken
 
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