rerouting piping

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Old 04-22-07, 09:27 AM
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Question rerouting piping

I'm finishing a basement and would like to move the piping for the hot water heating system. It currently hangs about 8" below the ceiling so before I sofit them off I would like to move them up about 7". There are three radiators taped off the pipe between the point where I want to move it. I would extend the pipes coming off the boiler by the 7 inches, move the galvanized pipe up and reconnect the radiators with bronze fittings and copper pipe. at the far side of the room I would elbow back down to the existing pipe before it continues through a solid brick support wall.

Is there anything that I'm not considering here? Are there issues with routing the heating pipes up and then back down. The return lines will also be rerouted, obviously. Any air in the system should be able to bleed from the prior to the elbow....
 
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Old 04-22-07, 09:36 AM
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Is it single pipe? Are all the branches coming off a single main pipe? And chance that you might be causing a natural air trap?
 
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Old 04-22-07, 01:31 PM
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it's a double pipe system. A send and a return. As long as airtraps are my only crux it will work. My concern is that puting a 90 degree elbow, a 7 inch pipe and another 90 degree elbow into the system to drop back down to it's original level at the end of the room would alter the back presure and change the flow. If that's not a concern and there aren't any other issues then it's a go.
 
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Old 04-22-07, 03:40 PM
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What do you mean a send and return pipe? They all have that. What Who was talking about is, is there a main pipe(maybe 1") that runs from the furnace, around the basement then back to the furnace, and has a pair of monoflow tees(one to feed off the main pipe and one to return to the main pipe) at each baseboard? Or does it go from the furnace to each baseboard, then back to the furnace with no tees?
 
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Old 04-22-07, 10:31 PM
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I am unable to completely visualize what you are proposing but it is never good practice (at least in my professional opinion) to intentionally create "traps" in the piping of a hot water heating system. By all things holy you should have a venting means every place where the piping goes down and then back up. Do not rely on the water "pushing" the air ahead of it.
 
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Old 04-23-07, 06:31 PM
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thanks for the responses. I'll try to better describe my situation.

I have two main pipes that come out of the boiler. All the water that comes out hot travelse through a radiator and is then returned to the boiler by the other pipe. The pipe that is hot when in use does not return any water to the boiler by any means other then through a radiator.

The pipes come out of the boiler and rise about 4 feet towards the ceiling. They are elbowed, 90 degrees, about 8 inches below the ceiling. They go out of the utility room and enter what will be an entertainment room. The pipes run 22' through that room, along the front of the house, and feed three radiators along the way, then there is a 90 degree elbow and they begin traveling 12' along the next wall, the side of the house. When they meet the next wall, there is another radiator, that makes four. This wall is a cement support wall so I won't make any changes there. Where the pipe meets that wall it hangs 5" below the ceiling.

My desire is to extend the vertical pipe coming out of the boiler by 5" so at the begining it will be 3 inches below the ceiling. I'll lift the entire run up that 5 inches untill I get to the far wall where I will drop back down the same 5" so I can hook back to the pipes that go through the cement wall.

It wouldn't be that hard to add a bleader valve at that point with an access panel.
 
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Old 04-23-07, 06:53 PM
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Definitely use a tee rather than an elbow where you drop back to go through the wall. Install a vent (it may be a manual vent) in the top of the tee.

I am more concerned about the branches to the radiators. I assume that now the branch off of the main line is either vertical or else it is horizontal and then vertical to the radiator. What I want you to avoid is going down from the relocated main and then up to the radiator. This will cause air to be trapped in the vertical "down" pipe. Contrary to what you may think this type of "trap" is rarely self purging of the trapped air and it will cause you no end of headaches.

Always keep the piping to the radiators horizontal or with an upward rise.
 
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Old 04-24-07, 06:13 AM
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Cool, I'll use the T and a valve then. Good advice.

The taps to the radiators are either horizontal or 45s to elbows then up. All the vertical sections are above the level that I'm moving the main lines to so I plan on removing the connecting sections and replacing them with brass fittings and copper pipe. Lots of experiance doing that sort of thing so by the time I get there I'll be comfortable. There won't be any traps in this area.

Thanks a million for the advice!
 
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