Asbestos removal or containment on hot water pipes


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Old 05-20-07, 07:39 AM
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Asbestos removal or containment on hot water pipes

I have an older house which we are about to sell, when we just found out from a plumber that we have asbestos wrapped hotwater pipes in the attic that go to our radiators. I have been told that removeable is quite expensive, and encapsulating is the most economical. How much less? I was also told by my plumber that I could do it myself, as my regulations allow owners to remove or encapsulate with out a license. He said it is easy, just wet it down thoroughly, cut it out in small chunks, while using a respirator, and proper suit. I have researched, and found out there is a special solution recommended to encapsulate, but no instuctions on how to do it properly. And if I follow instuctions, could a home inspector look at it and say "this needs to be done professionally, you did not do a proper job" when we try to sell this house? It is about 25 feet of piping with rusted metal straps around it.
Anyone tried this? Any advice, other than hire a professional at a large expense?(of course, I don't know how much of a large expense it would be, just "very expensive". Appreciate any input.

Regards,
Vidman 64
 
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Old 05-20-07, 09:24 AM
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There may be newer products available today, but asbestos can be encapsulated with pipe wrap of fiberglass cloth impregnated with Portland cement (stronger) or cloth impregnated with something like plaster of Paris. There are also products like Fibaroll that are fiber reinforced plastic. Suppliers for HVAC contractors and asbestos abatement contractors would have these materials.

The key is proper application without gaps. What's important is that the wrap be applied properly, so there are no gaps. Strips of cement and plaster based materials are cut and soaked in water and wrapped spirally around straight pipes and figure-eight on elbows. Plastic products are wrapped around pipes and joints sealed with a special tape.

Care must be taken not to disturb asbestos. Area should be sealed off, exhausted to outside, everything wet mopped afterwards. DIYer would have to wear approved HEPA respirator, goggles, gloves, and Tyvek overalls and covers for shoes. Overalls and shoe covers would have to be removed and bagged before leaving area. If asbestos insulation is intact and not deteriorating, it is possible that the DIYer would be at minimal risk.

"And if I follow instuctions, could a home inspector look at it and say "this needs to be done professionally, you did not do a proper job" when we try to sell this house?" Yes. Your own questioning of the DIY encapsulation as being questionable and/or suscept, is a hint that home inspector and buyer would also be suspect. A professional's statement would put everyone at ease and help expedite the sale of the home.

Encapsulation is less expensive than removal of asbestos. The wrap may cost the homeowner more in the long run when it comes time to remove it for plumbing repairs. It will require ongoing inspection and monitoring for damage and repairs made immediately.

Check with your local building inspector's office for what wraps are approved for encapsulation of asbestos in your area and whether DIY abatement measures require a permit and inspection. Building codes and required permits vary from area to area. Check with local building inspector before proceeding.
 
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Old 05-21-07, 02:05 AM
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Asbestos Encapsulation of Hot water heating pipes

Thanks so much for your speedy reply. I will get an estimate from an certified asbestos removeable company first. If it is over $2000.00 for encapsulation, I will do the removal myself with the proper covering and protection. Will wet the piping down well with a solution of water and dish detergent, slice the pipe open in strips of 2ft, wetting while I slice, and putting the 2 halved sections into very large ziplock bags, eventually putting them into larger bags to be sealed. Since this is up in an attic, before I climb down the step ladder, should I remove my coveralls first, and put them into a bag with my gloves, then exit, or exit, and then go outside and change. What do you thinks would be safer ?
Regards,
Vidman 64
 
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Old 05-21-07, 04:50 PM
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Coveralls

I would remove & bag them then exit. If you can, use some plastic sheeting to make a small "changing room" which is isolated from the work area.
 
 

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