Gas Furnace in Summer !


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Old 06-28-07, 02:01 PM
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Exclamation Gas Furnace in Summer !

I've a baseboard gas heating system which uses boils hot water than circulates this water into two zones to warm up the whole house. Can I turn off the pilot in summer season? It has three huge flames buring all the time and consuming gas for nothing.
- Are there any side effects of it later on; when I turn on my pilots and heat in the fall?
-What areas need to be cleaned in this type of fuenace and how should I clean them?
- Does this type of furnace needs to be cleaned every season or water in its pipes needs to be drained out? Pipes made up of copper.
- Can I change gas pilot to electric pilot? Do they sell in market? How much they cost?

Thanks a lot

Cadi
 
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Old 06-28-07, 07:22 PM
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Summer Shut Down, etc.

I do not encourage shutting off the pilot because that little bit of heat helps to reduce or eliminate condensation on the fire side of the heat exchanger. The small amount of gas you use is paid back in reduced service costs & longer boiler life.

Contrary to popular belief, there is a detailed procedure for PROPERLY cleaning & servicing a gas fired boiler. I do not suggest an untrained person tackle it due to the fact he/she could unknowingly create a dangerous situation. A true pofessional will inspect & test the boiler & venting system with combustion test equipment in addition to the actual cleaning.

DO NOT drain the pipes or boiler. To do so will introduce fresh, oxygen containing water when the system is refilled. Oxygen is a hot water heating system's worst enemy.

Your boiler, per the manufacturer's specifications, should be checked annually by a trained professional. Usually there is little actual cleaning to be done but the testing is important.

Most gas fired boilers can be converted to electronic ignition but unless you have the test equipment, it should be done by a pro.

My main intrest is your & your family's safety. Any fuel burning equipment can produce deadly amounts of carbon monoxide if not properly adjusted. Most service people don't mind you watching & asking questions. If after watching, asking, & learning you want to service the boiler yourself then have someone come in to test it, at least you will have some, albeit minimal, training.
 
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Old 07-04-07, 12:51 PM
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So how does this "condensation on the fire side of the heat exchanger" is controlled if I choose to put a Electric Ignitor system in this gas furnace? Or is it a totally different burning module? Please explain in details.
Can I turn off the Pilot and only clean the burner area for dust/lint deposits? Is it cruicial to call the service technician every year, this unit was serviced in Jan 2006. Can I wait until next year for the service?
 
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Old 07-04-07, 05:20 PM
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Electronic Ignition

If you install electronic ignition, there will be no condensation control.
 
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Old 07-08-07, 07:35 AM
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Exclamation

I think my way of asking question is bad. I didn't understood at all about the condensation!
Where do I gonna see this condensation, is it really bad to 'not to have a condensation control' in the gas furnace. What parts will get rust or where do you notice the damage in the furnace/burner/boiling tank, if there is condensation build up? How do you control condensation in a furnace that has Electric Ignition control.
Thanks
 
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Old 07-08-07, 08:50 PM
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Condensation

The condensation will occur in the passage ways where the heat from the flame travels. Depending upon how humid it gets where the boiler is & the style of boiler, the resulting rust from the condensation can plug the boiler over the summer. With electronic ignition there is no heat at all in those passages when the boiler is off. With a standing pilot, there is usually enough heat from the pilot to keep the passageways dry.
 
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Old 07-09-07, 11:10 AM
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Exclamation

So it means that Electronic Ignitors are not a good thing for older furnaces lilke mine? My one is 15 years old. Basement is humid but its controlled at 50% with my dehumidifier. I'll turn off my furnace pilots and will clean the burners later on if needed.

Which part of the boiler actually gets clogged and how you can clean it? Is it the burner part or the inside/outside of the boiler tank/hot water tank? Do you some picture shots of a boiler and how to clean it? Just an idea that I can rub/clean the rust off, if there is any build up.

Thanks
 
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Old 07-09-07, 02:07 PM
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I differ from my friend Grady in that I see no reason to leave a pilot burning when there is no call for heat.

Be sure to thoroughly clean the gas passages (fire sides) of your boiler at the end of the heating season and not wait until the beginning of the next heating season. If high humidity in your boiler room is problem you could install a small (like 100watt) radiant heater in the firebox of your boiler and that would eliminate the problems of rust and corrosion.

You probably could retrofit your boiler to an electronic pilot but it may make more sense to consider a new boiler.
 
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Old 07-10-07, 05:35 AM
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Pilot/No Pilot

Conditions, boiler design, & better yet, experience in your own application, is the best way to tell if you need to keep some heat, be it pilot or light bulb, in the boiler.
 
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Old 07-10-07, 02:07 PM
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Thanks a bunch for all who helped
 
 

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