Using Honeywell Aquatrol AQ475a outdoor reset

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Old 09-28-07, 02:36 PM
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Using Honeywell Aquatrol AQ475a outdoor reset

I have a Burnham Cast iron boiler i believe a 1970 version. The radiators are cast iron. There is a circulation pump in the return line with no bypass loop. I was thinking about buying a outdoor reset for the system and was wondering if this is a good idea with a non condensing boiler with no bypass loop? If anyone has any input that would be great. Just trying to reduce energy bills.. Thanks Todd
 
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Old 09-28-07, 07:12 PM
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I think it's an excellent idea. Your burner will run more often for shorter periods of time but your comfort will be greatly improved and your chimney will get just hot enough instead of toasty then unheated for a very long time.

I had a mechanical White-Rogers ODR on my old oil boiler and it really did make for a comfortable and somewhat efficient solution. The boiler was a very wasteful design so it really really helped.
 
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Old 09-29-07, 06:36 AM
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Thanks for the response . I was just concerned about condensing in the boiler. I now have the standard honeywell aqua constroller that controls the boiler and circ pump. Any ideas for setting the low temp settings? should i leave at the factory setting? I gather that i remove the old aqua controller and use the same well. the welll is located on the supply of the system.
 
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Old 09-29-07, 06:45 AM
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Originally Posted by Who View Post
I think it's an excellent idea
I'm not so sure I agree with ya Who...

Todd, are you firing Gas or Oil ? What type of chimney ? (masonry or manufactured ?) If masonry, is there a liner ?

Condensing in a gas system is bad, but condensing with oil is REAL bad ...
 
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Old 09-29-07, 07:24 AM
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Troop, you do... you just don't realize it... *swings trinket* :mask:

There's a floor to the curve setting when doing ODR so that you aren't condensing. At mild outdoor temps, you do a minimum of about 130 or so, you pick a safe minimum temp and you can go lower with an oiler than gas. It's much much nicer than having the whole house getting heated in the shoulder systems by having to ramp up to 180 each cycle and possibly overshooting the t-stat each firing cycle.
 
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Old 09-29-07, 07:37 AM
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Originally Posted by NJ Trooper View Post
I'm not so sure I agree with ya Who...

Todd, are you firing Gas or Oil ? What type of chimney ? (masonry or manufactured ?) If masonry, is there a liner ?

Condensing in a gas system is bad, but condensing with oil is REAL bad ...
The boiler is a 1970's gas fired Burnham. The stack is masonry without a liner. I assume the new Honeywell controller takes the place of the exsisting aqua stat?
 

Last edited by NJT; 07-20-11 at 02:56 PM.
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Old 09-29-07, 07:47 AM
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Originally Posted by Who View Post
Troop, you do... you just don't realize it... *swings trinket* :mask:
I'm getting sleepy ... s l e e p y ...

I'm going to _partially_ agree with you, if you are talking about _partial_ ODR .

I'm not hip to the exact temps that you need to be concerned with for gas, but I do know that with oil, you really don't want your return temp to go much lower than say 130*F or so, else you will start condensing in the boiler. Gotta keep an eye on the chimney temp too... Sulphuric acid vapor begins to condense at a little below 300*F, so you would want the gas at the TOP of the chimney not less than that. Depending on the chimney, you could lose from say 50 - 100 * from the flue entry to the top, maybe more ... I'd rather pay a bit more to keep that thing hot, and avoid the eventual expense of having to replace chimneys (and boilers) prematurely.

IF OIL, personally, I wouldn't let the aquastat go below 160*F ... and that ain't gonna save ya much.

When I snap my fingers, you will awaken, and not remember a thing until you hear the word 'swordfish' ...

Todd... you beat me to the 'SAVE' button ! , but still, with a non-condensing boiler of ANY fuel type, you can only do PARTIAL reset, and with a non-lined chimney, I would be VERY careful because it's gonna be a lot cooler in there than with the liner. If you do choose to go this route, think about at least having a liner installed.

BTW, with a 40-something year old boiler, I would be considering replacement soon anyway.
 
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Old 10-03-07, 08:55 PM
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Out door reset

Outdoor reset is not the only technology. They have been around for 20-30 yeasr and the best is to try indoor reset. Indoor reset takes the thermostat demand and interprets it into boiler out put. Heat loss is better measured from inside. No curves to adjust.
 
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