replacing boiler pump


  #1  
Old 11-04-07, 07:25 AM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 7
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
replacing boiler pump

I just had the service guy quote me over $700 to replace my leaking boiler pump. I need to do this myself, and the service guy was good enough to walk me through the procedure. I feel confident about doing the work, but less so about choosing the right pump. The current pump is a B&G series 100, 1/12 hp, 115 v, 1" flange. I've priced some pumps, and it seems I could save money (important right now) by replacing with a Taco pump. I'm just not sure what the critical specifications are to choose the right one. The boiler is in a one story, single family house with seven radiators. The output of the boiler is 84K BTU. The system worked fine before the pump started leaking. Any thoughts would be much appreciated.
 
  #2  
Old 11-04-07, 07:32 AM
Grady's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Delaware, The First State
Posts: 12,667
Received 39 Upvotes on 37 Posts
Circulator

In general, a Taco 007 will work just fine unless there is an unusual amount of restriction on the system.

Replacement is a pretty simple process but if you could post some pics of the boiler & nearby piping, explaining the replacement process would be much easier. You can post the pics on photobucket.com or similar site & provide a link here.
 
  #3  
Old 11-04-07, 07:40 AM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 19,710
Upvotes: 0
Received 8 Upvotes on 6 Posts
I like the Grundfos 15-58 , 3 speed ...

Grady, is the bolt spacing and flange to flange the same on these circs as the 100 ? I seem to recall about 20 years ago replacing the B&G at Mom's house with a 007 and found the flange to flange OK, but I had to file out the holes in the old flanges to get the bolts for the new circ in. I know I could have changed the flanges, but it was midwinter on Sunday and we needed heat back in the house FAST...
 
  #4  
Old 11-04-07, 07:57 AM
Grady's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Delaware, The First State
Posts: 12,667
Received 39 Upvotes on 37 Posts
Flanges

I replace B&G 100's all the time with 007's & they pop right in.
I've not used many Grundfos circs but as I recall & unless they have changed, the flanges are 90 to the Taco & B&G. In some cases this isn't a problem but in others it is. If the flange orientation on the Grundfos is the same or turning the circ 90 isn't a problem, the 15-58 would be my first choice as well because of the 3 speed capability.
 

Last edited by Grady; 11-04-07 at 07:59 AM. Reason: More info.
  #6  
Old 11-04-07, 08:17 AM
Who's Avatar
Who
Who is offline
Member
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: San Jose
Posts: 2,066
Upvotes: 0
Received 2 Upvotes on 1 Post
Grady, you can rotate a Grundfos 90 very easily...
 
  #7  
Old 11-04-07, 08:27 AM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 19,710
Upvotes: 0
Received 8 Upvotes on 6 Posts
I think you can get the 15-58 with a 90* turn on the flange but you might not find it on the shelf as readily. The TACO is also available with the flanges turned.

Looking at the pics, I think the 15-58 will fit fine...

Grady, should he pull the check valve from the new pump before installing ?
 
  #8  
Old 11-04-07, 08:41 AM
Grady's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Delaware, The First State
Posts: 12,667
Received 39 Upvotes on 37 Posts
Check Valve

If there is another flow check in the system, yes, pull the circulator's internal check.
 
  #9  
Old 11-04-07, 08:46 AM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 7
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
I must admit that I don't know enough about this to know if my system has another flow check.
 
  #10  
Old 11-04-07, 08:53 AM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 19,710
Upvotes: 0
Received 8 Upvotes on 6 Posts
Originally Posted by jkrena View Post
I must admit that I don't know enough about this to know if my system has another flow check.
I don't see one in the pics... but then, I don't think the 100 had one either.
 
  #11  
Old 11-04-07, 09:51 AM
Grady's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Delaware, The First State
Posts: 12,667
Received 39 Upvotes on 37 Posts
Flow Check

One more pic would help us determine if there is a flow check or not. That pic needs to be a "wide angle" showing as much of the boiler & piping as possible.
 
  #12  
Old 11-04-07, 09:54 AM
Grady's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Delaware, The First State
Posts: 12,667
Received 39 Upvotes on 37 Posts
flanges

Originally Posted by Who View Post
Grady, you can rotate a Grundfos 90 very easily...
The last time I tried to twist cast iron, it didn't work so real well. You can rotate the motor within the housing but you can't re-orient the flanges in how they relate to the motor. If they are paralell with the motor, that's how they're gonna stay.
 
  #13  
Old 11-04-07, 12:30 PM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 7
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
  #14  
Old 11-04-07, 12:35 PM
Grady's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Delaware, The First State
Posts: 12,667
Received 39 Upvotes on 37 Posts
Pump Curves

I was just looking at the pump curves for the 15-58 vs. the B&G 100. The 100 won't do a lot of head but does move a lot of water at low head. To me, it looks like the Grundfos UPS 26-99 would be a better match. The only problem is the flanges are perpendicular (sp?) to the motor which may or may not be an actual problem depending on what is in the way.
 
  #15  
Old 11-04-07, 12:46 PM
Grady's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Delaware, The First State
Posts: 12,667
Received 39 Upvotes on 37 Posts
Thanks for the pics

BIG help. I didn't see any flow check. You do need to measure the distance between the flanges just to be sure the new circulator will fit. The 26-99 & 15-58 are 6" from flange to flange.
 
  #16  
Old 11-04-07, 01:16 PM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 7
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
The 100 is 6-3/8 flange surface to flange service. However, with the pump out, the distance between the pipe flanges is barely 6". I pushed up on the top pipe and found that there must be almost an inch of wiggle room. Seems like anything between 6 and 6-1/2" will fit in that space.
I want to make sure I understand what you've told me so far. The Taco 007 or the Grundfos 15-58 should work, but the second Grundfos you mentioned might be an even better choice, provided it will fit in the space. (It is about 4-1/2" from the center of the pipe where pump connects to the inside edge of the supply line. There is less room than that on the boiler side.) Also, I should leave the flow check in the pump because there is not one in my system. What kind of problems might I encounter if I choose the wrong pump?
 
  #17  
Old 11-04-07, 07:39 PM
Grady's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Delaware, The First State
Posts: 12,667
Received 39 Upvotes on 37 Posts
Circulator

Yes, leave the check valve in. I believe these circulators come with the check valve on the discharge side of the body. You want to mount the circ with the arrow pointing down. I suggest the 26-99 instead of the 15-58. If your circ is too small, it will take forever and a day to get heat. The 26-99 on medium speed is a close match to the B&G 100.

Honestly, I think your only easy fix is going to be to replace the bearing assembly on your B&G. Replacing a bearing assembly is easy.

Every Grundfos or Taco I've looked at which would do the job, has the flange made 90 to the way you need it. I have seen Grundfos pumps with the flange going the way you need but I don't know if that orientation is available on the 26-99.

Good Luck & let us know how things go.
 
  #18  
Old 11-05-07, 05:04 AM
K
Member
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 2
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Replacement of the bearing assembly is the way to go. Its inexpensive, quick (1 hour), and a direct replacement (no fiddling with alinement, flanges or piping.

The B&G bearing assembly will last several years (5-10?) but not forever, whereas the motor (the expensive part of this project) should outlast the boiler.

However, if you do decide to replace the entire circulator with motor, but the circ flanges are not alined to give the best use of the space available in your boiler room, turn the flanges on the pipe so the circ motor will install oriented the way you want.
 
  #19  
Old 11-06-07, 08:27 PM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 7
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
I managed to talk to a serviceman who works on boilers here in St. Louis where we still have A LOT of old buildings with radiated heat. He assured me that the Taco 007 would work just fine in my system. He mentioned a couple other models as well, but the Taco 007 was the easiest to find locally.
Anyway, it's all installed and working splendidly.
Thank you all for your help.
 
  #20  
Old 11-07-07, 04:28 PM
Grady's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Delaware, The First State
Posts: 12,667
Received 39 Upvotes on 37 Posts
007

That 007 is an amazing little circulator. Without knowing all the details about the system, I was just trying to match the old B&G as closely as I could. Glad you are up & running.
 
  #21  
Old 11-08-07, 05:48 PM
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: usa
Posts: 839
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Unhappy

Originally Posted by jkrena View Post
I just had the service guy quote me over $700 to replace my leaking boiler pump. . Any thoughts would be much appreciated.
$80 pump. One hour max labor. I am in
the wrong trade!
 
  #22  
Old 11-08-07, 06:05 PM
Grady's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Delaware, The First State
Posts: 12,667
Received 39 Upvotes on 37 Posts
Radio

I'd bet he was quoting on using another B&G 100. Even at that, I'll replace 'em all day long @ 700 smackers a pop. You know where I can get that job?
 
  #23  
Old 11-08-07, 06:09 PM
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: usa
Posts: 839
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Grady View Post
I'd bet he was quoting on using another B&G 100. Even at that, I'll replace 'em all day long @ 700 smackers a pop. You know where I can get that job?
My old oil company changed out my B&G 100
a few years back with a Taco 007. Bill was
about 100 bucks IIRC. I didn't have a service
contract.

Pete
 
  #24  
Old 11-12-07, 07:20 PM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 7
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
I believe the $700 included replacing with another B&G plus time to bleed the radiators, etc.
When I said something about doing it myself, the service guy actually encouraged to me. He walked me through the procedure and gave me ideas about where to buy the pump. I paid $80 for the service call, but the advice was worth it to me.
 
  #25  
Old 11-12-07, 08:07 PM
Grady's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Delaware, The First State
Posts: 12,667
Received 39 Upvotes on 37 Posts
Service Guy

Most of us are pretty good about trying to help folks out. We are consumers too. $80 is a cheap educatiion. Glad all worked out well for you. Stay warm this winter.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: