thinking of adding baseboard heaters [hot water]


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Old 11-11-07, 10:43 AM
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thinking of adding baseboard heaters [hot water]

i would like to add some baseboard water heaters to my current system [ to make the rooms hotter] . i was thinking of adding two 8' sections in two diffrent rooms[one in each].
would adding additional baseboards decrease the heat in all rooms or would it be a good idea??
 
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Old 11-11-07, 01:26 PM
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Adding baseboard

Before getting real excited about adding baseboard, make sure the existing is in good shape. Are the fins intact & clean? Is there at least a 2" air gap between the bottom of the baseboard & carpet? Do you have enough boiler to handle the extra baseboard? Check the rating plate on the boiler & measure the existing baseboard (1 foot of baseboard = aprox. 600 btu/hr.).
 
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Old 11-11-07, 04:58 PM
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what does checking amount of baseboard have to do with boiler size. Almost every job today should have more radiation than baseboard. Check the heat loss and verify the boiler matches that. Add all the baseboard you want it does not change the boiler size, just the boiler piping. I have done jobes where there is twice as much radiation as boiler size. My home for instance has 157,000 btu's of radiation and the boiler is 68,000 and indirect. Has worked great for 11 years even in temps as low as 4f. House was built in 1919. No sidewall insulation. Size boiler to heat loss all else is piping and controls.
 
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Old 11-11-07, 08:11 PM
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Originally Posted by rbeck
what does checking amount of baseboard have to do with boiler size.
Here's my take on it:

Too much radiation in relation to boiler size means the delta T will probably be too high, unless you run short loops. Even if you do that, your boiler will most likely short cycle because with all that radiation it will never need to run long enough to come up to temperature before the thermostat is satisfied and stops calling. If the boiler never comes up to temp, there is a far greater chance of condensing in the flue passes and shortening the life of the boiler. Ideally you want the radiation matched to the boiler.

And besides that, why waste money on radiation that you can't use and don't need? Even if you don't care about or don't believe the above, it's a waste of money !
 
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Old 11-11-07, 11:02 PM
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towncarblue, how are your radiators piped? Are they all connected in one big loop? Several loops? A single big pipe with lots of branches for each baseboard?
 
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Old 11-12-07, 12:20 AM
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it looks like its multiple loops. one for the first floor and one for the second floor, and one for the indirect water heater
 
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Old 11-12-07, 08:01 AM
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How much out of balance are the rooms and have they always been out of balance?

You can do a lot of balancing without having to do anything major. Like Grady said, baseboards work best when the fins have been cleaned, there's a good unobstructed space underneath so that air can get in there to convect and also try to have the front of the baseboards as unobstructed as possible, especially in the rooms you want warmer.

Use the t-stat to get the rooms you want warmer and for the rooms you don't want as warm, try wrapping part of the fins with aluminium foil to reduce their output.
 
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Old 11-12-07, 09:51 AM
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i noticed that in the rooms that i have heating issues there is water on the indoor of the windows[not between][double pane windows]. could this cause a room to be significantly cooler than ones without? im about to go today and silicone em up
 
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Old 11-12-07, 02:12 PM
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High humidity

Excessive condensation on the inside of the windows generally indicates a high humidity level. Look around for any possible causes for that. Possibilities include roof leaks, plumbing leaks, bathroom vents not working or being used, basically any means that excess humiditiy can build up. High humidity will cause a room to feel 'clammy'. Too low humidity isn't good either, I like to maintain about 40-50% in my home. You might wanna pick up one of those little weather stations at wal-mart and see what the humidity is ?

rbeck, it's been pointed out that my reply above sounded a bit harsh... not my intent! Just looking for some debate is all, and giving my opinion. So no offense intended, sorry if it came out that way.
 
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Old 11-12-07, 02:29 PM
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I BOUGHT A 6' baseboard. ima gonna install it in one of the rooms for now. i need to know how do i take out the water from the baseboards so that i can add the new baseboard to the system.

also i noticed that the previous installer installed the bleeder pointing down. isnt that supposed to be pointing up?
 
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Old 11-12-07, 06:23 PM
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Bleeder

It depends upon where the bleeder is located. If it is on the bottom of a "trap" it is there for draining the loop & should be down. If it's on the baseboard, it should be up.
 
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Old 11-14-07, 07:29 AM
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so there should be a air bleeder on the baseboard itself or on the side? all i see is a bleeder valve[ pointing down] next to the baseboard [separate instal] .

also.. are circulators supposed to be on all the time? one of them [ armstrong astro 30 ] keeps turning off. it also feels hot , but i dont know if its the water passing through that makes it hot.


.....
i went and flipped a switch on the relay control . it started working but then it stopped[or slowed down
 
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Old 11-14-07, 08:16 AM
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the pump keeps turning on and off. what could be wrong??
 
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Old 01-06-08, 06:41 PM
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firgured out why the pump shuts off. the pump that kept shutting off was controlled by the indirect water heater
 
 

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