Another Honeywell Zone Valve question

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Old 11-20-07, 06:05 PM
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Another Honeywell Zone Valve question

Boy, am getting knowledgeable about these things...but, I can't find out this info: My end switch is shot on a V8043E 1012. The local Radio Shack has nothing like it. I don't know where to get one (Long Island, New York)...So, I may just buy a new Zone Valve. The local shops have V8043 E,F and 1012 and 1036. There is also V8043E5012 (5000 series). What the heck are the differences?
Application: Hot water heating, need the end switch to fire the circulator, cast radiators in that loop.
 
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Old 11-20-07, 07:54 PM
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End Switch

As far as I know, the end switch is not available as a repair part. I've been known to take a small drill bit & oval the screw holes a little. Often this will allow enough adjustment of the switch to make it close. It seems these 5000 series valves are fairly new. Might still be under warranty. Check the 4 digit date code.

http://customer.honeywell.com/TechLi...0s/50-9210.pdf
 
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Old 11-20-07, 08:12 PM
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Odd thing about MicroSwitch is that they are now a division of Honeywell!!! You need a MicroSwitch distributor. Worst case try Mouser Electronics or DigiKey.

http://www.mouser.com/catalog/632/1370.pdf
 
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Old 11-20-07, 09:02 PM
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Microswitch

Thanks RC, I'll take a gander at that catalog myself. I'd much rather replace a switch than the whole powerhead.
 
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Old 11-20-07, 09:41 PM
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MicroSwitch has been a division of Honeywell for a long, long time. There are probably hundreds of different models of switches.

Cherry is another brand of switch and makes several that are physically interchangeable with MicroSwitch.

You can also order them from Allied Electronics and many other distributors..
 
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Old 11-21-07, 05:15 AM
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cherry E-23 lines up as far as amps, size, and mounting.. check the catalog for size

http://www.cherrycorp.com/english/sw...iature/e21.htm

any 5 amp spst Normally Open snap switch that is the same size and mount pattern will do

even the universals with both no nc terminals work, just cut off the nc terminal

http://www.allelectronics.com/cgi-bi...,_10_AMP_.html

SPDT work too! call and see what size and mount hole measurements are
 

Last edited by brewaholic; 11-21-07 at 05:53 AM.
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Old 11-21-07, 06:33 AM
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Originally Posted by brewaholic View Post
cherry E-23 lines up as far as amps, size, and mounting.. check the catalog for size

http://www.cherrycorp.com/english/sw...iature/e21.htm

any 5 amp spst Normally Open snap switch that is the same size and mount pattern will do

even the universals with both no nc terminals work, just cut off the nc terminal

http://www.allelectronics.com/cgi-bi...,_10_AMP_.html

SPDT work too! call and see what size and mount hole measurements are
I will call both parts houses. So, I want: 5A or 10A, 1/4HP, 125/250VAC ?
The current switch (As best as I can read on it) says: 11A 3HP 125/250AC. Part # V5C010SB3X147
 
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Old 11-21-07, 07:15 AM
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5 or 10 amp switch will handle most heaters. 5 amp 1/4 hp motor direct or 10 amp 3 hp is a lot of amps on the tt side.

I've used the cherry E-23 on gas heaters with taco and grundfro circulators with no problems

that 10amp switch if the size is right will replace the 11amp as long as the heat rating is the same. and as I said I've used 5 amps with no problems with gas.
 
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Old 11-28-07, 05:51 PM
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I have a Honeywell V8043 F 1036 zone valve with the same problem and with the same microswitch part number. I called the Honeywell customer service line and “Bob” with a heavy foreign accent said unless I was an HVAC contractor, the only tech support he could offer was for me to call an HVAC contractor and have them fix the problem. After some research and noticing my microswitch had “honeywell” embossed on the backside, I found out that the part number is for a Honeywell microswitch available only in Europe. After talking to the Honeywell Microswitch folks at http://sensing.honeywell.com, the closest equivalent they have in the US is V7-1C10D8 which has slightly smaller mounting holes and quick connect vice solder type terminals. I ordered one from Allied Electronics at http://www.alliedelec.com for $2.62 plus shipping as I figure can drill out the holes and trim the terminals back to solder on the wires. It seems like a pretty good investment considering a new power head sells for about $80.00 at Grainger.
 
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Old 11-28-07, 05:58 PM
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Originally Posted by wishbone4401 View Post
I have a Honeywell V8043 F 1036 zone valve with the same problem and with the same microswitch part number. I called the Honeywell customer service line and “Bob” with a heavy foreign accent said unless I was an HVAC contractor, the only tech support he could offer was for me to call an HVAC contractor and have them fix the problem. After some research and noticing my microswitch had “honeywell” embossed on the backside, I found out that the part number is for a Honeywell microswitch available only in Europe. After talking to the Honeywell Microswitch folks at http://sensing.honeywell.com, the closest equivalent they have in the US is V7-1C10D8 which has slightly smaller mounting holes and quick connect vice solder type terminals. I ordered one from Allied Electronics at http://www.alliedelec.com for $2.62 plus shipping as I figure can drill out the holes and trim the terminals back to solder on the wires. It seems like a pretty good investment considering a new power head sells for about $80.00 at Grainger.
I'm not sure if you meant drilling the plate the switch mounts to, or attempting to drill into the Mircoswitch body. Those switch bodies are molded from extremely thin Bakelite, and are very friable. Drilling into the switch may cause it to shatter.

Pete
 
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Old 11-28-07, 06:20 PM
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I'm not sure if you meant drilling the plate the switch mounts to, or attempting

Good Point. The difference in hole sizes is about 6 mils (0.120 vs 0.114). I mic'ed the screws and the're about 0.108 and the spec sheet on the switch has the holes at 0.114 +/- 0.002 so I may not need to enlarge the them unless they are holding sloppy manufacturing tolerances on the power head plate.
 
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Old 12-10-07, 05:00 AM
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the cherry e23 switch doesn't need any altering, it screws right in. they also have that series in the 10 and 15amp versions. look at a cherry catalog.

http://www.cherrycorp.com/english/sw...E21_Series.pdf

Of course honeywell will never have that switch they sell the whole head at 80 bucks instead
 
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Old 12-10-07, 06:03 PM
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Are there any alternatives to the Honeywell V8043 ?

Through these forums, I threw away my Bell pump on my old boiler and installed a TACO 007 2 years ago. Man oh man what an improvement. I acutally bought 3 on Ebay because the pumps run 20 hours a day 7 months a year here in Michigan. ( 4 Unit apartment building)...and I am still on the origional.

My question is , my valves seem to last about 5 years. Just used my last spare tonight. I would like to buy 2-3 more. Are there other better brands ? Thanks Steve
 
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Old 12-10-07, 06:10 PM
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If you like the Taco pumps, why not try the Taco zone valves? The 570 series (gold head) are pretty good. I had a couple that were still going strong after almost 20 years (before the heads were gold, even...).
 
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Old 12-10-07, 06:19 PM
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Why ?

Now that I know taco makes Valves I am headed to
Google to learn more.
Thanks !
 
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Old 12-10-07, 08:26 PM
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Zone Valves

The Honeywell V8043-5000 series are supposed to hold up better than the V8043-1000 series. How true that is, I don't know.
 
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Old 12-11-07, 05:28 AM
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no taco

What I have in front of me that came off was a honeywell 8844 on the motor and V8043E stamped near the top.

I found no tacos that looked like they would plug into the valve. As far as I can tel, I have had no vavle failures, or motor failures, its the mechanics ( Springs and levers ) from the motor to the valve.

Thanks for the model tip. Its the 2nd worst part of landlording. Getting calls about heat problems.
 
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Old 12-11-07, 06:24 AM
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Steve,

If you switch to taco you would need to replace the complete zone valve.

The one thing that goes is the gears on the motor. the motor is a reduction gear type and is replacable

http://cgi.ebay.com/HONEYWELL-802360...QQcmdZViewItem

the two springs and gear/lever on the head shouldn't go near as much as the motor or end switch in the head unit.

The one thing you can not do.. is try to run the head unit when it is off the valve body that will trash the gears

If your head gears are going every five years.. something is wrong! pull the head and move the valve manually then lube with silicon grease once a year.
 
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Old 12-11-07, 07:55 AM
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Acutally I do a partial motor-power head replacement.

Maybe I should have mentioned..
I have never replaced the valve. Its alwasy heating season when the tenants call,,,I do not want to drain the whole system and solder in the new valve.

I unscrew the two bolts and replace the motor/head assembly.

I have never lubercated, I should and will in the future.. I manually turn the valve with a screw driver to make sure it turns freely before installation.
 
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Old 12-11-07, 08:11 AM
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Steve, you do not want to turn the gears before the head is screwed onto the valve body. The head plate is not stable enough on it's own and will flex.

The four points + valve stem on the valve body stabilize the head unit and keep it from flexing.
 
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Old 12-12-07, 06:30 PM
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Replacing the microswitch in a Honeywell V8043 zone valve

Well I got my replacement Honeywell V7-1C10D8 microswitch from Allied electronics and finally got around to installing it in my inoperative V8043 F 1036 zone valve. Everything worked fine. The switch was a perfect match – the screws fit the holes in the switch and connected to the holes in the baseplate without any problem. The replacement Honeywell switch is set up for quick connect terminals but this proved not to be a problem. While it may not look like it, the switch has ample clearance for this type of quick connector when mounted to the baseplate. All I had to do was cut off the normally closed connection on the new switch with a pair of dikes, bend down the normally open connector, cut the wires off the old switch, strip off some insulation and solder the wires to the common and normally open quick connectors on the new switch. The hardest part of the process was being sure all the parts were re-assembled correctly and for that it helped to pull the head off a working zone valve and use it as a reference. Aligning the gears can be tricky because the parts all want to fly apart and this can be exacerbated if the 3 twist tabs that anchor the head to the baseplate aren’t completely straight to align with their 3 slotted holes. I found the best way to align the gears is to position the geared cam in the baseplate as far in the open position as it will go. If you hold the cam in that position from the side with your thumb while the rest of your hand is holding the baseplate and slip the motor assembly on top of it and into the 3 slots, the gears fall right into alignment. Then twist-lock the tabs and re-install the springs. The inner spring is hard to attach unless you have some small needle nose pliers or some small dental or surgical tools. The biggest lesson learned from this is don’t get the switches from Allied Electronics. The switch was 2.62 and the shipping and handling was close to $8 and they sent it by US mail. Honeywell’s website at http://sensing.honeywell.com/index.c...60/la_id/1.htm
lists several sources for their products and if I have to do this again, I’m going to try to find someone locally or at least shop around.
 
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Old 12-12-07, 07:16 PM
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timing

Wishbone, thanks for your updates, I wish I had your patience. I just buy the whole zone valve and replace the whole power unit to keep the heat flowing.
When I did my last repair, this past Monday..I must have levered one of the zone valves to the "open " position as another tenant called me and complained the thermostat was at 55F but it was 90F in the apartment.. It took me two seconds to fix, popping the zone lever out of "open" to the "automatic" position the boiler shut off. I thought the zone valve was made to do this automatically. Any comment ? is it worn out ? I bought one yesterday on ebay for $50. I was out of spares. \\\

and 2) it appears there are honeywell zone valves that apprea the same, but have screws for the wires instead of the 4 wires ( two yellow 2 red ) that come out of my honeywells. are these a newer version ? When a poor rookir slob like me had to keep track to 20 wires.....4 per zone plus thermostat wires..all going to wires nuts..its overwhelming.

landlord steve...just trying to not have negative cash flow in Michigan.
Landlord Steve
 

Last edited by sdanville; 12-12-07 at 07:28 PM. Reason: typo
  #23  
Old 12-12-07, 07:47 PM
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Steve, the ones with wires are the 8043E , and the terminal board ones are 8043F ... there's an extra terminal on the F model that is basically there for convenience, it's only a 'tie point' to make it easier to wire in some cases... otherwise same, but there are also different flow ratings on both of them ... that's where the 4 digit suffix number comes into play.
 
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Old 12-12-07, 07:52 PM
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NJ MASTER of valves

Thanks
NJ for the input.
Once again I am finding myself out of my element with flow rates. I think I better just stick with what is there and replace with identical honeywell control valves.
HOWEVER, I have yet to replace the acutal valves and just replace the power heads.

Thanks again

steve
 

Last edited by sdanville; 12-12-07 at 07:53 PM. Reason: add
  #25  
Old 12-13-07, 04:55 AM
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Originally Posted by wishbone4401 View Post
Well I got my replacement Honeywell V7-1C10D8 microswitch from Allied electronics and finally got around to installing it in my inoperative V8043 F 1036 zone valve. Everything worked fine. The switch was a perfect match – the screws fit the holes in the switch and connected to the holes in the baseplate without any problem. The replacement Honeywell switch is set up for quick connect terminals but this proved not to be a problem. While it may not look like it, the switch has ample clearance for this type of quick connector when mounted to the baseplate. All I had to do was cut off the normally closed connection on the new switch with a pair of dikes, bend down the normally open connector, cut the wires off the old switch, strip off some insulation and solder the wires to the common and normally open quick connectors on the new switch. The hardest part of the process was being sure all the parts were re-assembled correctly and for that it helped to pull the head off a working zone valve and use it as a reference. Aligning the gears can be tricky because the parts all want to fly apart and this can be exacerbated if the 3 twist tabs that anchor the head to the baseplate aren’t completely straight to align with their 3 slotted holes. I found the best way to align the gears is to position the geared cam in the baseplate as far in the open position as it will go. If you hold the cam in that position from the side with your thumb while the rest of your hand is holding the baseplate and slip the motor assembly on top of it and into the 3 slots, the gears fall right into alignment. Then twist-lock the tabs and re-install the springs. The inner spring is hard to attach unless you have some small needle nose pliers or some small dental or surgical tools. The biggest lesson learned from this is don’t get the switches from Allied Electronics. The switch was 2.62 and the shipping and handling was close to $8 and they sent it by US mail. Honeywell’s website at http://sensing.honeywell.com/index.c...60/la_id/1.htm
lists several sources for their products and if I have to do this again, I’m going to try to find someone locally or at least shop around.
Whoa there buddy!

there is no need to take off any springs or play with those tabs to replace the motor or end switch.

the only thing you need to do is place the valve head in the manual open position before removing the head from the valve body.

two screws removes the head from the valve body.

one screw is removed on the left motor bracket, then swing the motor counterclockwise at the bottom and pull as you are turning.

then you remove the two screws on the micro end switch.

Once removed you take off the cardboard and cut the wires close. strip resolder then reassemble. Yes you need to cut the NC tab if it comes with both NO/NC, I discussed that in another thread.

put the cardboard back on, install the switches two screws

motor is replaced in reverse order by starting with the gear through the hole wiggling left and right until gear drops into head gear then turn the bottom of the motor clockwise until locking screw threaded hole aligns then replace the motor screw.

reinstall the head. then take out of manual open and energize the valve to test

If your thermostat control wires are long enough you can do this right on top of the heater without removing those wires. It takes about ten fifteen minutes once you do a few
 

Last edited by brewaholic; 12-13-07 at 06:00 AM.
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Old 12-13-07, 11:07 AM
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BTW if you have a pair of hemostats and a mini torch it makes real quick work of the soldering process but a small 15watt iron will work also.

You pre-tin the stripped wires and load it up with solder.

then clamp the pre-tinned wire onto the fluxed switch terminal with the hemostats.
heat until it starts to flow then remove heat.
cool, remove the hemostat.
 
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Old 12-14-07, 07:24 PM
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Whoa there buddy!

there is no need to take off any springs or play with those tabs to replace the motor or end switch.

the only thing you need to do is place the valve head in the manual open position before removing the head from the valve body.

two screws removes the head from the valve body.

one screw is removed on the left motor bracket, then swing the motor counterclockwise at the bottom and pull as you are turning.

then you remove the two screws on the micro end switch.

Once removed you take off the cardboard and cut the wires close. strip resolder then reassemble. Yes you need to cut the NC tab if it comes with both NO/NC, I discussed that in another thread.

put the cardboard back on, install the switches two screws

motor is replaced in reverse order by starting with the gear through the hole wiggling left and right until gear drops into head gear then turn the bottom of the motor clockwise until locking screw threaded hole aligns then replace the motor screw.

reinstall the head. then take out of manual open and energize the valve to test

If your thermostat control wires are long enough you can do this right on top of the heater without removing those wires. It takes about ten fifteen minutes once you do a few
Thanks for the "duh" input - I just wish I had seen it before I fixed my second inoperative zone valve. Now I'll have wait until the next one fails.
 
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Old 12-15-07, 01:18 AM
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Originally Posted by wishbone4401 View Post
Thanks for the "duh" input - I just wish I had seen it before I fixed my second inoperative zone valve. Now I'll have wait until the next one fails.

well you should know your way around that valve head pretty good by now!

just think at 10 bucks a switch.. you saved 70 bucks on each
head repair. 140 bucks in the pocket aint bad
 
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