No PSI registering

Reply

  #1  
Old 01-23-08, 03:57 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 2
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
No PSI registering

Brand: National US
Temperature reaching 185, then kicks off but not getting any reading on the PSI gage. Both readings are on the same gage. The water is circulating through the system heating the home. Does this mean there is a problem with the motor not putting out enough to register or the gage itself?? Any comments would be greatly appreciated.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 01-23-08, 05:35 PM
J.D.S.'s Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Central Minnesota
Posts: 27
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
There is a valve (pressure reducing valve) that cuts down the incoming water pressure down to around 12 psi. This is what gives the system it's pressure. It is located on the cold water feed. It could be faulty. Another possibility is that there is a backflow preventer (check valve) on the line that could be stuck or plugged.
 
  #3  
Old 01-23-08, 08:18 PM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 23,539
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
you could also be correct about the gauge being defective, in addition to JDS suggestions. I doubt you have a problem with the pump though...

You can go the Home Depot or Lowes and pick up for under $10 a gauge that is used by lawn sprinkler people that screws onto a hose fitting. They don't have very good resolution at the lower pressures because it's a 0-200 PSI gauge. But it will be good enough to verify if it's a gauge problem or not. Screw it onto one of the hose fittings on your boiler and open the valve.
 
  #4  
Old 01-23-08, 10:53 PM
boilersrus's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 313
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I guess I'm toooooo cheap! chp chp chp cheeeeeeep!

I would have just manually fed water into the boiler, and listened for the flow, until the relief blew, while looking at the guage to see if it moved.

Now, it doesn't get ANY cheaper than that!

Charlie
 
  #5  
Old 01-24-08, 01:23 AM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,493
Received 33 Votes on 25 Posts
Charlie, the problem with your method is when through a lack of maintenance the safety valve is stuck shut and won't open.
 
  #6  
Old 01-25-08, 07:04 AM
boilersrus's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 313
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
furd: One of the VERY FIRST things I do is check the relief valve, pressure, feeder, LWCO, and any other safety related equipment. THEN I go ahead and check other necessary things.

I remember one time the guage was stuck on 10# and I kept feeding and figured the water was leaking out somewhere, and the relief blew unexpectedly! The OUTPUT of the relief valve had a short little nipple on it and it was pointing right towards the guage! I was looking at the guage at the time! I saw it starting to weep and started standing up and the hot water got me on my neck, chest , waist, and needless to say downwards. I still have a burn scar on my stomach, nowhere else thank goodness!

Since then I have been a little overly concerned with safety.

I always carry a couple of spare relief valves and make a couple of extra bucks with them. If I pull the lever to clean out the relief and I can't get it to shut off, or if I then put in 30#+ and it doesn't 'blow' I change it. I say about 1/3 of the time they should be changed anyway.

People just don't get maintenance on their equipment until something goes wrong! THEN, they want cheap prices and fast service!

They ask "What's wrong with my boiler"?

I tell them: "LOM"

"What's that"? they ask.

"LACK OF MAINTENANCE" I TELL THEM.
"$300" TO GET IT RIGHT, OR CALL THE GUY YOU CALLED BEFORE AND HAVE HIM PUT A BAINDAID ON IT THAT WILL TAKE 10 MINUTES AND $150.00.

End of the story!

Charlie
 
  #7  
Old 01-25-08, 06:48 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,493
Received 33 Votes on 25 Posts
Good for you and thank you.

Lack of maintenance is the number one cause of problems. This equipment IS rugged but it can't work forever without maintenance. In the commercial and industrial world we check safety valves by actually pulling the handle to be sure that it releases and then shuts off. We check low water cut offs quarterly and we check flame safety devices monthly.

On the "smaller" boilers we change the safety valves every three to five years and on the "larger" boilers we have the safety valves rebuilt and certified every three to five years. My feeling is that residential boilers should have their safety valves changed every three years or when ever it fails a test.

Pressure and temperature gauges should be tested against a known gauge yearly and replaced if it differs significantly from the test gauge.

Low water cut off need to be removed (probe type) or opened (float type) yearly and cleaned.

To facilitate this work it is ideal if the boiler has valves to isolate it from the system. This way it is not necessary to dump all the system water to perform boiler maintenance.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: