How do Hot Water Baseboard Heaters Work?


  #1  
Old 02-10-08, 05:32 PM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: usa
Posts: 51
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Question How do Hot Water Baseboard Heaters Work?

I'm a little confused about how the water gets into the system.

I have an oil burner. I followed the main water line coming into the house and I see that it goes into the boiler.

How does that water enter into the baseboard system? I thought the baseboard was a closed circuit...

The reason I'm asking is b/c I added a room and Im adding baseboards to that room.

I posted the other day and have done some research already.
I used the Slantfin program to figure out how much i need. I have one zone that splits at the boiler w/ 3/4" pipe and returns w/ 1" pipe. So I'll be fine w/ the extra baseboard.

So, this is really what I need to know.
1. How do I drain the system to add the extra pipe.
2. How do I fill it back up/bleed the system when I'm done.

Thanks!
 
  #2  
Old 02-10-08, 06:23 PM
Grady's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Delaware, The First State
Posts: 12,667
Received 39 Upvotes on 37 Posts
Pictures

If you can get some pictures of the boiler & near boiler piping & post them, it will be much easier to explain how to do what you want. You can post pictures on photobucket.com or similar site & provide a link here.
 
  #3  
Old 02-10-08, 07:22 PM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 19,710
Upvotes: 0
Received 8 Upvotes on 6 Posts
Here for reference is sandonn's original thread:

http://forum.doityourself.com/showth...76#post1310976

I'd like to see some pics also ... it would help us help you.

How much new baseboard are you going to install, based on the heat loss of the new room ?

Did you understand what I said about running a new loop, rather than cutting into the existing one ? and that the rooms downstream from the new loop may suffer from having cooler water delivered to them ? In other words, the heat you put into the new living room will be taken away from the other rooms ... You see, there is just so much heat going to go down that pipe. The heat is going to jump off at each baseboard, and the water leaving that baseboard is going to be cooler, and less able to heat the rooms downstream.

If you use say 5000 BTU to heat the new living room, that's 5000 LESS BTU available to the rooms downstream ...
 
  #4  
Old 02-10-08, 07:27 PM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 19,710
Upvotes: 0
Received 8 Upvotes on 6 Posts
Closed system

The water in the baseboards is the same water that's in the boiler. The water in the boiler is heated and pumped through the baseboard pipes. The water in the baseboards is not separate from the water in the boiler. When you add water to the boiler, you add water to the entire SYSTEM.

After we see the pictures, we can better tell you how to drain and re-fill ... all systems are different.
 
  #5  
Old 02-10-08, 08:03 PM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: usa
Posts: 51
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
I have one zone that splits right at the boiler.
I have an L-shaped ranch.
One of the splits goes to the bedrooms and bathroom.
The other goes to the kitchen and living room.
So, after reading through "Zoning made easy" on the Bell & Gosset site and using the SlantFin program, I see that the current baseboard in my house isnt set up optimaly. I have a little overkill in some of the rooms....
As you guys have already mentioned you can get up to 67' of exposed element w/ 3/4" pipe in a single circuit.
However something I learned was that if you split the pipe, you can then receive 67' w/ 3/4" pipe per split.
W/ that in mind, I should have no problem adding the extra pipe.

According to the Slantfin program I need 9' feet of element.
The room is 11.3' x 13.6'. The door opening is about 2 feet off the wall. Despite the Slantfin recomendation, I was thinking of adding 11' along the window wall and another 2' along the ajoining wall next to the door opening.
I was thinking of this b/c most of the 11' wall is going to be cover by both a couch and a toy box for the kids.
What do you think?

Here is the pic of my boiler.
 
  #6  
Old 02-10-08, 09:56 PM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 19,710
Upvotes: 0
Received 8 Upvotes on 6 Posts
Slow down...

You initially told us that you had " 1 zone " ...

WRONG!

In your pic, I see THREE ZONE VALVES, meaning you have at least THREE zones ... you see those silver boxes on pipes on the right of the boiler ? those are the zone valves.

Take a look at the circulator, and follow that pipe up... see those shutoff and drain valves ? each one of those is a return from a zone.

One of your zones is your indirect water heater, to the left of the boiler.

So, you've got at least TWO thermostats in the home, each controlling a separate ZONE.

There is a thermostat on your water heater too, controlling that ZONE.

It appears that there is an EXTRA return piped in ... the second one from the bottom, above the return from the water heater. DOES THAT GO ANYWHERE ? I can't tell from the pic if there's a pipe off that going someplace.

If that isn't being used, part of your job is already done, you can use that as a return for your new room.

I don't see an extra spot on the supply side though, so you would have to cut in between the boiler and the other zone valves with a TEE and add another zone valve ...

It's not as easy as you are leading yourself to believe...
 
  #7  
Old 02-10-08, 10:03 PM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 19,710
Upvotes: 0
Received 8 Upvotes on 6 Posts
You can add more baseboard than you need... if you find it's too much and the room overheats, you can always just close the damper on the baseboard, or cover sections of the fin tube with heavy duty aluminum foil and effectively shorten them. Easier than ADDING baseboard if you find you didn't put in enough.

Have you put up the drywall yet ?

You might want to think about running some thermostat wire if you haven't ...
 
  #8  
Old 02-10-08, 10:27 PM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 19,710
Upvotes: 0
Received 8 Upvotes on 6 Posts
This would be one way you might possibly pipe in the new circuit.

 
  #9  
Old 02-11-08, 04:16 AM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: usa
Posts: 51
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Ok, I guess I had the whole thing backwards....

I thought the 2 pipes on the left next to the circulator were the outgoing pipes, and the one on the right was the incoming pipe.
So is the pipe on the right 1" and the 2 on the left 3/4" pipe?

Well you're saying the 2 on the left are the return.

The one on the bottom is the water heater return.
The one on the top is the return from the kitchen/living room.
It goes to the living room first, and then the kitchen, next would be my garage conversion if I split into that line.

The next one down goes to the bedroom and bath.

The one right above the the water heater doesnt go anywhere.

And yes I already put up the drywall, so I can run thermostat wire.
 
  #10  
Old 02-11-08, 07:36 AM
J
Member
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Just outside of Phila
Posts: 335
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by NJ Trooper View Post
You can add more baseboard than you need... if you find it's too much and the room overheats, you can always just close the damper on the baseboard, or cover sections of the fin tube with heavy duty aluminum foil and effectively shorten them.
Just something to think about. I finished up a room over the summer and there was 10ft of baseboard in the room. After I insulated the room, the required baseboard was approx. 4ft. Well I installed 10ft in case in the future I add a new boiler I can run at lower temps. Well this room is now very hot. I closed the damper and wrapped the fins with foil and its still hot. I brought home a laser temp monitor and that rooms walls and ceiling is 10 degrees hotter then all the other non-insulated walls. Therefore, you might want to install a TRV with a bypass. I will be adding them for every room that I redo now. It will add to the cost but you will have a more comfy room and a better flow balance through your system. Just something to think about.
 
  #11  
Old 02-11-08, 03:14 PM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 19,710
Upvotes: 0
Received 8 Upvotes on 6 Posts
It's very difficult to judge the size of pipes in a photo ... but it appears that the pipes off the boiler may be 1", and they reduce to 3/4" to run to the various parts of the house.

The picture I doctored up is just a suggestion of one possible way you could do this job.

Since the existing LR and KIT circuit is at the BEGINNING of that circuit, adding the new piping for the new room to the END of the circuit may not be such a bad thing then ... If the water is a little cooler by the time it gets there, and you add a little extra baseboard, then that's a good thing ... with somewhat cooler water, you will need a little more radiation capacity. Baseboard is rated at 500-600 BTU/FT at a nominal 170-180 water temp. If you supply say 160 water to the new baseboard, you may only get say 400-450 BTU/FT out of it. It's all about the BTUs ...

OK, now that's outta the way... tell me this:

How much baseboard is in the existing LR and KIT that you plan to cut into ? Is it 50' or less ? If so, then you should be good to go just adding another 10-15' of baseboard for the new room.

At every point along the added baseboard where the piping turns DOWN for any reason, add a BASEBOARD TEE so that you can install a small manual air bleeder to get rid of pockets of air. Remember that air traveling through the pipes will NOT want to travel downward, and by adding these air bleeds from the start, you could save yourself some hassles later. DON'T use the 'automatic' variety, they can and do leak... a small leak could go un-noticed a LONG time and cause water damage. Use the kind that require a coin or a key to operate them.

If you are planning on carpeting the new room, raise the new baseboard up on the wall to allow at least 2" of air space between the carpeting and the bottom of the front plate on the baseboard.

I like John's idea of the TRV (Thermostatic Radiator Valve) and a bypass ... TRVs are non-electric valves that you can install that will shut off flow to a radiator when the room reaches temperature. You would need to bypass the radiator also, so the water could continue to flow back to the boiler. (do they make 3 way TRVs ?)
 
  #12  
Old 02-12-08, 04:33 AM
J
Member
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Just outside of Phila
Posts: 335
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Would he need a 3 Way TRV? Wouldn't he plumb it in seen below? A TRV operated by a thermostat in the room would be nice


 
  #13  
Old 02-12-08, 09:54 AM
Who's Avatar
Who
Who is offline
Member
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: San Jose
Posts: 2,066
Upvotes: 0
Received 2 Upvotes on 1 Post
The 3way TRV is a very elusive fitting. The last name I had for a company offering them was Enerjee. The valves themselves I think were sourced from Sweden.
 
  #14  
Old 02-12-08, 02:51 PM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 19,710
Upvotes: 0
Received 8 Upvotes on 6 Posts
I don't recall EVER having seen one ... but I didn't look all that hard .

Another option would be a 3-way zone valve on it's own circuit with a separate transformer and thermostat.

John's idea would work also, the only thing I might be a bit leary of is if dropping to the smaller size bypass might hinder the flow when the other rooms in the zone were calling for heat. I realize it would only be a short section of 1/2", and probably not a problem, but something to consider.

The other caveat to that idea is that _some_ flow will always find it's way through the bypass line... reducing flow in the baseboard.

But, hopefully, the room won't suffer from overheating if the baseboard is sized properly, and he won't need any of the options.
 
  #15  
Old 02-12-08, 04:58 PM
Grady's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Delaware, The First State
Posts: 12,667
Received 39 Upvotes on 37 Posts
Trv

Thermostatic Radiator Valves work best on monoflo tees.

In a series loop without a by pass if any valve were closed, none would work. With a by pass you are still going to get some heat unless the by pass were insulated. In baseboard the insulation would take up so much room it would block a lot of the air flow from the fin tube. Sorry if I burst anyone's bubble but better to be aware now than sorry later.
 
  #16  
Old 02-16-08, 10:14 PM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: usa
Posts: 51
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by NJ Trooper View Post
At every point along the added baseboard where the piping turns DOWN for any reason, add a BASEBOARD TEE so that you can install a small manual air bleeder to get rid of pockets of air. Remember that air traveling through the pipes will NOT want to travel downward, and by adding these air bleeds from the start, you could save yourself some hassles later. DON'T use the 'automatic' variety, they can and do leak... a small leak could go un-noticed a LONG time and cause water damage. Use the kind that require a coin or a key to operate them.

Ok.... SO everything went well. I added the extra pipe into the loop. I only have a total of about 60' on that loop so I'm good.
One small problem.... I forgot to add the air bleeder. So, of course now I have air in the system. I opened up the return valve by the bioler and that helped a little. But i can still hear the water swishing around in the new room and into the kitchen.
What can I do to get rid of this? Should i just reheat on of the corner pipes and take it apart, and then add a bleeder?

Also, on my boiler I have an automatic air eliminator. What does this do?
I think the one i have is the Taco 400 hyvent like this one http://www.houseneeds.com/shop/Heati...o400hyvent.asp


thanks.
 

Last edited by sandonn; 02-16-08 at 10:44 PM.
  #17  
Old 02-17-08, 10:08 AM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 19,710
Upvotes: 0
Received 8 Upvotes on 6 Posts
Well... it's not as easy as it sounds ... because you now have water in the pipes, and that's gonna make it very difficult to un-sweat and re-do ... that water in the pipes is gonna do everything in it's power to prevent you from making a good solder joint. One little drop of water can prevent a good joint. Shoulda paid 'tenshun son !

Oh well... what's done is done, but before you rip into the system, try this:

It appears that blue handle valves are hose drains, and the black ones are shutoffs ...

Turn the boiler off.

Hook a drain hose to the blue valve for that zone. CLOSE THE BLACK VALVE. If you don't close the black valve, the water will just come in the feed, up the pipe and out the drain, never going through the zone.

Manually open the ZONE VALVE for that zone. Make sure all the others are off (thermostats turned down)

Open the blue drain with the hose. There is a lever on the pressure reducing valve for a "FAST FILL", move that lever to the fast fill position. This will force water at high speed through ONLY that zone, and MAY clear the air.

When you get clear water with no bubbles, put the fast fill lever back to auto, close the drain, and open the black valve. Set the zone valve back to auto, refire the boiler.

It may not work, but it's worth a try before you start ripping up and doing over.

The automatic air vent on the boiler is to do just what it says. Automatically remove trapped air... BUT it will only work if the air can move through the system. If it's trapped in the zone, it won't do a thing ... by the way, the small cap on top of that thing must be loose to allow the trapped air to escape.
 
  #18  
Old 02-18-08, 10:48 PM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: usa
Posts: 51
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Just wanted to give an update...

The auto air eliminator worked.

I had already tried bleeding the system as you suggested by purging water through the valves by the boiler.
I did it late Sat night, but when i went to bed I could still hear the water swishing through the pipes.

When I got up sunday morning I didnt bother looking at the pipes again and headed straight to lowes to get an elbow air vent. I figured I would end up having to replace it.
Well, I was out for most of morning running errands, and by the time I got back it had fixed itself.

Its been fine since then. No more water sounds, and the heat is flowing nicely.

Thanks for the help...
 
  #19  
Old 03-01-09, 11:30 AM
C
Member
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 18
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
bleeding hot water base board heater

:Hi All
I am new to this site and not the shapest tack in the box at this.
My grandson has no heat on third floor of his house (was working)I belevie air locked .He has three zones one for each floor.Ist And 2nd are ok. Third floor has app 30 feet rads,single loop Hot water seems to be coming up to entrance of first rad.two rads about fifteen ft in each room hooked together at 90deg angle.There is a bleeder on the end of each rad..By just opening the bleeder should this remove air.How long should I bleed each one as it seem like cold water is coming out although pipe comming up to rad is hot.

Zone valve ciculater seem to be working

Thank you
If you can help will make me look pretty good in my grandson eyes

Have nice day

capetish
 
  #20  
Old 03-01-09, 12:21 PM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 19,710
Upvotes: 0
Received 8 Upvotes on 6 Posts
First thing to ask is:

What are the readings on the pressure gauge on the boiler? And what temperature you are reading that pressure at.

If this is a 3rd floor, there may not be quite enough pressure all the way up top. You need almost a half a PSI for every foot of height in the system... PLUS 3-4 PSI on top of that.

So, if the boiler is in the basement, you may be looking at 30 feet or so from the boiler to the top of the highest radiator... and that would mean that when the boiler is COLD you need at least 17 PSI to start with... when the boiler heats, the pressure will go higher, but should not go higher than 25 PSI... if it does, then there's something else you need to look at... but give us the pressure report first...
 
  #21  
Old 03-01-09, 12:52 PM
C
Member
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 18
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
bleeding hot water base board heater

around 15 psi cold goes up to 20 21 when hot.,that is what grandson said. boiler temp is 185

capetish

Thank you for the quick reply
 
  #22  
Old 03-01-09, 01:05 PM
C
Member
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 18
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
bleeding hot water base board heater

You may be hit the nail on the head
I never thought to check boiler pressure ,.I just called him and that is what he saie Around 20 to21 psi when hot.He said temp was 185
 
  #23  
Old 03-01-09, 01:58 PM
F
Member
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Virginia
Posts: 80
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
I just would like to say that after reading the thread on the auto air vent,I checked mine. The little screw cap on top of the extrol tank/filll valve was tight. I loosen it up a little and got some air to come out and a little water. I adjusted the screw cap so no water comes out but not too tight. I never thought to look at this part of my system. Thanks for the info
 
  #24  
Old 03-01-09, 02:33 PM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 19,710
Upvotes: 0
Received 8 Upvotes on 6 Posts
capetish, that's not a bad range, 15-21... but it probably could be a couple 2,3 psi higher. The pressure reducing valves are adjustable... if we knew what kind it was, we could walk you through the adjustment.

flybob, if you continue to get water out of the valve on the autovent, it means that the valve isn't closing... you should only get air. Some of them can be taken apart and cleaned, some can only be replaced. What kind is it?
 
  #25  
Old 03-01-09, 03:23 PM
C
Member
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 18
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
bleeding hot water base board heater

I am not familiar with that valve .Is that the one that is called kick off valve that lets off pressure at 30 lbs.or are they both combined.I will have to check it out Is that the one on house water feed to boiler.
I really hate to boter you this much.your help is well appreciated.Not to worry I am very careful and will not do anything unless I am advised by somebody like yourself.
I will check it out and get back to you

Thank you that sounds very logical since third floor heaters are almost 30 feet from basement floor.
 
  #26  
Old 03-01-09, 03:39 PM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 19,710
Upvotes: 0
Received 8 Upvotes on 6 Posts
You ain't botherin' me Gramps!

The 'pressure regulating valve' is the one on the water feedline to the boiler from the house. Depending on manufacturer, could be tan, red, green, goldish, black... looks kinda bell-shaped... there should be another thingy next to it, a 'backflow preventer', and there will also be a manual shut off valve in that line.

This is the Watts brand:


photo courtesy Pex Supply
 

Last edited by NJT; 03-01-09 at 04:17 PM.
  #27  
Old 03-01-09, 03:48 PM
Grady's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Delaware, The First State
Posts: 12,667
Received 39 Upvotes on 37 Posts
Water?

Originally Posted by flybob View Post
I just would like to say that after reading the thread on the auto air vent,I checked mine. The little screw cap on top of the extrol tank/filll valve was tight. I loosen it up a little and got some air to come out and a little water. I adjusted the screw cap so no water comes out but not too tight. I never thought to look at this part of my system. Thanks for the info
Flybob,
If you loosened the auto vent cap & got some air & a little water, that's fine, BUT if it was the plastic cap on the tank you loosened, you have problems & need a new tank.
 
  #28  
Old 03-01-09, 04:06 PM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 19,710
Upvotes: 0
Received 8 Upvotes on 6 Posts
That's a good point Grady! Re-reading that post it does sorta sound like he messed with the expansion tank, don't it? Hopefully you didn't let the air outta yer expansion tank, cuz if you did, now you have to put it back!

Bob, this is what the autovent looks like.


photo courtesy Dekka Supply
 
  #29  
Old 03-01-09, 04:11 PM
C
Member
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 18
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Hi
just went up and checked that valve
Watts h1156f
reg 12-15 psi
range 10-25

I did lift top lever up and water flow into bolier stoped at 22lbs.

Neve done no more till I get spec adjustment


You are hopefully right
Thanks hope this helps.

Thanks for the gramps.Yep my grandson just came back from afganastain had two tours.Just bought this house a few months ago.Him his wife and my two great grandkids(boy and girl love the house large and old.
Must be good stuff in old things

Capetish
 
  #30  
Old 03-01-09, 04:53 PM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 19,710
Upvotes: 0
Received 8 Upvotes on 6 Posts
How many PSI did you increase it? I'm assuming the boiler was hot and already at like 20-ish? Reason is that if it was cool at the time and you went from 15 to 22 you will probably have the relief valve opening next time it fires and heats...

So, only increase it a couple PSI...

Remember that when the boiler heats, the pressure rises, and if it approaches 30 PSI the relief valve will open.

So, see if this works, and then if it does, we'll talk about how to adjust the valve.

Please thank your Grandson for serving!
 
  #31  
Old 03-01-09, 04:54 PM
C
Member
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 18
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
bleeding hot water base board heater

Originally Posted by NJ Trooper View Post
You ain't botherin' me Gramps!

The 'pressure regulating valve' is the one on the water feedline to the boiler from the house. Depending on manufacturer, could be tan, red, green, goldish, black... looks kinda bell-shaped... there should be another thingy next to it, a 'backflow preventer', and there will also be a manual shut off valve in that line.

This is the Watts brand:


photo courtesy Pex Supply
Yes sir same one that is on there Like I said I lift lever and let some water flow into boiler stopped at 22 pounds
 
  #32  
Old 03-01-09, 05:24 PM
C
Member
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 18
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
No never touched ajusting nut just lift lever and let little water in boiler.I assume that is ajusting nut under lever

Will check out tomorrow bleed upstair rads and let you know
Thank you

capetish (Have a great evening)
 
  #33  
Old 03-01-09, 06:47 PM
Grady's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Delaware, The First State
Posts: 12,667
Received 39 Upvotes on 37 Posts
Capetish

If you turn the top stem with (the lever on it) clockwise as viewed from the top, it increases the pressure setting.
 
  #34  
Old 03-01-09, 06:55 PM
F
Member
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Virginia
Posts: 80
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
I just looked, I have the Fill-trol system Expansion control with automatic fill ferature. The tank on the bottom is a grey extrol type. I only opened the little metal screw cap on the top of the vent.
 
  #35  
Old 03-01-09, 07:04 PM
Grady's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Delaware, The First State
Posts: 12,667
Received 39 Upvotes on 37 Posts
Vent Cap

If the cap on the auto vent was where you got the air & a little water, you are fine. We just wanted to be sure.
 
  #36  
Old 03-01-09, 08:31 PM
F
Member
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Virginia
Posts: 80
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Thanks, I will leave the cap loose to allow it to work.
 
  #37  
Old 03-02-09, 10:03 AM
C
Member
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 18
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Hi just going up to check that 'pressure regulating valve' and cushion tank.
when thermostat is turned on on third floor a gurgle comes out of rads but water does not flow .I am going to check that prv like you suggested also is it possible have air in that loop that that the bleeders on the rads cant get rid off.Another thing my grandson said when he bleeds rads on third it drains all the water out .leave it alone and water pressure will come back.Almost like you said prv is not working right,Will let you know.

thank you all

capetish
 
  #38  
Old 03-02-09, 12:26 PM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 19,710
Upvotes: 0
Received 8 Upvotes on 6 Posts
There should always be pressure out of the bleeders... you should get a steady stream... if you don't, then it's almost definite that there isn't enough pressure in the system to get water to the top.

As long as there is enough pressure, you should be able to get the air out with the bleeders. Try bleeding first with the circulator NOT running, and again with the circulator running... but you have to solve the pressure problem first.
 
  #39  
Old 03-02-09, 01:31 PM
C
Member
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 18
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Yes I figured you would have to have pressure all the time even without ciculater not working There is a leak in that loop or like you suggested a bad or Leakey prv.I will check it out and set pressure like you suggested this evening.My grand son is still in Military ,he goes to collage each day.They promised to help him finish his education after his tours.True to there word he has two more years to go.He signed up for another five years.

Listen i really thank you for your help and will keep you posted.I feel this will be solved with the help of all you great guys(Not calling a plumber yet)

capetish
 
  #40  
Old 03-02-09, 05:19 PM
C
Member
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 18
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Hi Trooper
I think you were right on
I went up shut down furnace.drained cushion tank
I shut off first and second floor disconnected thermostat for third floor at boiler.


Boiler pressure would only com up to 14 pis.
I adjusted feed valve about half turn pressure came up to around 19psi

hooked up third floor therm lots of heat yeee.My only problem is pressure goes up to 30psi She never kicked off relief valve though.Heat came up to 23f ion third floor shshut down .All seem to be working fine,just pressure up to 30 when running around 19 when off.Is there an adjustment proceeder for that valve or should i just replace it?

i dont mind taking it apart to see if it ti dirty.There are unions on both sides

Thank you

Cape tish .
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: