what type of boiler do i have - bleeding question

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Old 03-21-08, 06:20 AM
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what type of boiler do i have - bleeding question

I have a boiler that has 2 zones to baseboard heating. It is connected to the main water line of the house. I want to drain the boiler to remove a section of baseboards and close the loop again. this was added for an apartment in the garage that is no longer there. what do you think the type of system i have is and what do you think the steps would be to refill/bleed it. I can handle the draining but the refillign seems to be an issue. I knkow it has an expansion tank adn bleeder valves. i have also heard that newer systems are self bleeding. this system is one winter old. thank in advance for the advice.
 
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Old 03-21-08, 06:58 PM
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Draining-Refilling-Bleeding

Some pictures of the boiler & nearby piping would be a big help. You can post them on photobucket. com or similar photo sharing site & provide a link here.
 
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Old 03-21-08, 07:01 PM
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While some systems are able to expel the air more readily than others, there is no such thing as a self bleeding hydronic system.

On those pictures, be sure to give us clear close-up pictures of the point where the individual heaters connect to the main piping system.
 
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Old 04-09-08, 07:06 AM
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sorry for the delay...here are a bunch of pictures of the important stuff on my heating system.












Thanks in advance for the replies!
 
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Old 04-09-08, 05:38 PM
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It's a nice compact piping job but unfortunately the air eliminator is not piped in the best manner.

It appears that there may be a purging valve on at least one loop. It would be that valve with the wheel that has a tag hanging from it.
 
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Old 04-09-08, 06:16 PM
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Refilling & Purging

If that tag says something about the system having anti-freeze in it, I suggest you get a pro to do the job. Anti-freeze is good stuff IF done right. If it isn't done right, it can do more harm than good.
 
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Old 04-09-08, 07:53 PM
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btw, when you mention the valve with the wheel...you mean the top picture with the yellow tag...correct? the system isnt closed either so there is no chance of their being antirfreeze in the system. at one time when the house was abandoned before i bought it they did put antifreeze in the system to winterize it but that was flushed out throught hte hot water. what do you think my cahnces are of me draining this sucker and bleeding it on my own?
 
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Old 04-10-08, 07:56 PM
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I'll tell ya what I'd do

I'd drain only as much as I needed to by keeping all valves to other zones closed. Go ahead & remove the baseboard & splice the pipes back together. Turn the water back on & manually open the relief valve until water spews out. Let the system come up to pressure. Make sure the green ball valve in front closed as well as the yellow handled valve above it for the zone you did NOT work on. Open the yellow valve for the zone you did work on. Connect a hose to the tagged valve. Put the other end of the hose in a 5 gallon bucket & open the tagged valve. When you no longer get a lot of bubbles close the tagged valve & open all heating valves. Fire the boiler & try the repaired zone. You will probalby still hear air but as long as you get circulation, the air vents should take out any remaining air.
 
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Old 04-11-08, 06:37 AM
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While the system is drained I would eliminate the air vents on the return side of the boiler, get the feed water from going directly into the boiler and installed between the expansion tank and air seperator and get the relief valve vertical as directed by code.
 
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Old 04-11-08, 08:41 AM
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I have a question for you...rather than using the draincock to drain the boiler, can i just cut the pipe and letter the water drain out where i want to splice it....this is probably an unusual question but this pipe happens to be in the garage so it would drain down my driveway.
 
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Old 04-11-08, 08:37 PM
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Draining

I don't suggest it. You need to drain water away from where you are going to splice. You need to keep water away from any soldering point otherwise you'll never get a good solder joint. RBeck made some good suggestions.
 
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