duel zone hot water baseboard heating system

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Old 03-22-08, 09:54 AM
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duel zone hot water baseboard heating system

I have a oil burning hot water baseboard heating system that is duel zoned. Last week the thermostat in zone 2 ( upstairs)stopped working. When I raise the temperature in the zone, the digital display shows the system is on yet the furnace doesn't come on. When I do the same in zone 1 the furnace comes on right away. I tried switching the thermostats and the same thing happens so I'm pretty sure that's not the problem. I have Honeywell Magicstat thermostats if that's helps. I really appreciate any advise or help.

Thanks in advance
 
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Old 03-22-08, 11:39 AM
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Zone 2

My first question has to be, how much pressure is on the boiler? It should be around 12-15#. Do you have zone valves or a circulator for each zone? Is it operating?
 
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Old 03-23-08, 08:04 AM
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Grady, my pressure is around 50 psi. I have zone valves i think ( there's 2 little red bell shaped things) 1 has a "pump" type handle ,like an old well pump. I spoke to my furnace guy and he said because when the furnace is on, the zone valve is leaking. He says that I need a new expansion tank. But this wouldn't explain why the heat doesn't come on upstairs would it? I appreciate any input you can provide
 
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Old 03-23-08, 08:54 AM
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Wink

I spoke to my furnace guy and he said because when the furnace is on, the zone valve is leaking. He says that I need a new expansion tank.
I think Id look for a new tech to work on that boiler. That 50lb psi is way too high even if the tank is bad. Check it your self do you get water or air out of the schrader valve on it. Is the gauge right and working???? at 50 psi the T/P pop off should have let water out of the boiler at 30 psi?????
 
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Old 03-23-08, 09:40 AM
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edonald, take another look at the pressure gauge. See if there are two scales on it, one in FEET, and one in PSI. I suspect you are reading the FEET scale...

50 FEET is approximately 22 PSI .
 
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Old 03-23-08, 10:36 AM
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NJ Trooper, I checked the gauge again.It reads KPA ?? & PSI. The PSI is around 50. I'm guessing that's not a good thing.

Ed, forgive my ignorance but what is a schrader valve and what does it look like. If it's the tire stem looking thing at the bottom of the expansion tank then water comes out of it.
 
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Old 03-23-08, 12:30 PM
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Schrader, etc.

A schrader is the tire valve looking piece. The fact water comes out is a dead give away the expansion tank is bad.

That red bell shaped device is a Dual Control Valve. The bell farthest from the boiler is the reducing valve & the one with the "pump handle" on it is the relief valve. These valves are no longer legal. There should be a relief valve mounted on the boiler. You have other issues as well but this is a safety matter so let's deal with it first.

If you can, please take some picutes of the boiler & near boiler piping from as many angles as you can. You can post them on photobucket. com or similar photo sharing site & provide us with a link to them.
 
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Old 03-28-08, 02:42 PM
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Gentlemen, sorry it took so long to get back. I was without a computer for the week. I decide to call my furnace man to get the heat working upstairs ( my wife gets very nervous when I start tearing into things like that). He got the heat working again,said my gauge was bad ( explains the 50 psi) but I decided to order and "try" to install the expansion tank myself. Will probably try tomorrow so I would gladly appreciate any input on how to do it from whomever can offer the advice.
Once again thanks to all who responded
 
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Old 03-28-08, 08:05 PM
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Thumbs up Whew

Glad the gauge was bad. Fifty psi on a boiler is scary.

Pics would be a big help in trying to explain how to change the tank. If you can't post pics, let us know & we'll do our best to tell you how to change the tank.
 
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Old 03-29-08, 12:46 PM
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Grady, here are some pics. I'm guessing I have to shut off the furnace & water do I have to drain the furnace. It's a furnace/hot water tank all in one.

http://i301.photobucket.com/albums/n...d/100_1343.jpg
http://i301.photobucket.com/albums/n...d/100_1341.jpg

Thanks
 
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Old 03-29-08, 01:13 PM
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Changing tank

Shut off the power & water feed to the boiler.

Drain just enough water to drop the pressure to zero.

Pre-assemble a nipple & valve.

Unscrew the old tank. CAUTION: IT WILL BE HEAVY.

Screw the nipple/valve assembly into the elbow to which the tank is connected & screw the tank into the valve.

The purpose of the valve is to make future changing of the tank easier.
If you wish, you can add a nipple & tee to the bottom of the valve. On the branch of the tee, install a plug, nipple & cap or nipple & valve. This allows you to check the pressure on the tank at any time without draining water. You simply close the top valve & open the valve on the tee. By doing so, you have taken system pressure off of the tank & can check the tank pressure with a tire gauge. Much less hassle to do it when changing the tank than having to drain water to check the tank.
 
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Old 03-29-08, 01:47 PM
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Thanks for the help Grady.I'll let you know how it worked out.

Thanks a million
 
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Old 03-29-08, 01:57 PM
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Grady is talking about something like this, you don't need the pressure gauge though, that's just something I added...

You don't need to use copper, black iron is stronger and better for this purpose. (and cheaper, easier since you don't need to solder anything)

Also, you don't need to use a high pressure steam valve either, that was in the junkbox so I used it. A standard port ball valve is fine.

 
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Old 03-29-08, 03:05 PM
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Yeah, that's it

I knew one guys on the board had one. Just couldn't remember if it was Trooper or Radio Connection. The pressure gauge serves as a redundant gauge to the one on the boiler. Nice touch.
 
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