Hydro-Air System

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  #1  
Old 03-22-08, 06:33 PM
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Hydro-Air System

Has anyone recently had a Hydro-Air system installed? I currently have a forced hotair and a hotwater baseboard system in place and have heard that Hydro-Air system will allow me to go with one system. I already have the duct work installed and am curious what the cost is compaired to going with two seperate systems. I know that the best way to determine this is to have a specialist come out and give me a qoute, but I figured I would check here.
 
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Old 03-22-08, 07:20 PM
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If you've already got both installed, then you have the best of both worlds.

I wouldn't go from hot water to hot air if someone gave me the furnace and installed it for free...

Hot water is a much better heating system that hot air, don't let anyone kid you. It's more comfortable, more efficient, and healthier.

My opinion, yes... but backed by fact.
 
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Old 03-23-08, 05:22 AM
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I agree with Trooper completely.

The only plus in combining systems might be that a hydro air system could be designed/sized to run at fairly low supply temperatures using a modulating/condensing boiler, or solar thermal with boiler backup. If either/both your existing heat sources are in need of replacement, it's an option worth exploring.

But given the choice between air and hot water heating, hot water wins in my book.

If you go hydro-air, you definitely want an experienced pro to lay out the possible options for you and design it properly. That probably eliminates about 75-85% of the installers you will talk to.
 
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Old 03-23-08, 02:00 PM
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Having the forced air system gives you many options that are not readily available to hydronic-only systems.

You have the option of adding cooling if your ductwork was properly sized.

You can easily humidify the air during the heating season if you suffer from low humidity.

With the cooling option comes summertime DEhumidification.

You can install air filters to help clean the air inside your home.

Continuous blower operation (if you have the correct air handler) can help even out the temperature throughout the home.
 
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Old 03-23-08, 05:30 PM
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The problem with my current system is that 90% of the house is forced hot air and an in-law and living room is hot-water baseboards. Both systems are old and will need replacing soon. Im trying to determine the cost difference in installing two separate units versus one hydro-air system. Like I said before, I know the easiest way to do this is to have a couple pros give me estimates, I just wanted to check with the forum prior to doing that to get a rough idea.
 
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Old 03-23-08, 06:38 PM
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Now I understand ... I didn't quite get what you were asking!

So, you currently have a hot air furnace, AND a boiler.

You want to replace them both with one unit ... gotcha...

you are gonna keep the baseboards, and add a hydro-coil to the current existing ductwork to heat the rest of the house with hot air ... gotcha ...

Sounds like the most economical way, and as furd said, easy to add central air later.
 
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Old 03-23-08, 06:59 PM
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Just bear in mind increase air currents and increase heat loss.
 
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