Beckett AE burner - keep or replace?

Reply

  #1  
Old 05-12-08, 11:36 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Maryland
Posts: 72
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Beckett AE burner - keep or replace?

My boiler is serviced every year, and records show it's efficiency test results are 84-85% each year.

The burner is a Beckett Model AE... I have not been able to find anything out about this model burner.... I'm mainly wondering if it is in fact a flame-retention burner.

If not, it would make sense to replace it with a new burner, correct?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 05-12-08, 12:23 PM
plumbingods's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Manch-vegas, New Hampshire
Posts: 2,182
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I am not familiar with an Beckett AE burner, I usually see Beckett AF & AFG burners. But I suspect it is a flame retention burner.

Also, an efficiency rating of 84-84% is excellent for conventional oil heating systems. To get any better than that you would have to change your complete heating system. And so far I have only seen 1 brand with a high efficiency condensing boiler.

Your efficiency is combined with both the burner and the heating appliance.
 
  #3  
Old 05-12-08, 06:35 PM
Grady's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Delaware, The First State
Posts: 13,996
Received 11 Votes on 10 Posts
Beckett AE?

Nor have I ever heard of an AE. Are you sure it is not an AF or AFG? What is the make & model of the boiler?
 
  #4  
Old 05-13-08, 03:55 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Maryland
Posts: 72
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Yes it's an AE

Model # AE-672025. Built in 1988.
 
  #5  
Old 05-13-08, 04:31 PM
plumbingods's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Manch-vegas, New Hampshire
Posts: 2,182
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Hi,

Let's start with the efficiency rating you are getting is excellent. I would not change a thing.

I would love to see a picture of where you are getting that Beckett burner model number from, because I have looked through Beckett's web site twice now with multiple searches and have come up with nothing. I have also been in the trade since 1993 and have never heard anyone talk of that burner. I have also cleaned hundreds or burners and have never seen a Beckett AE burner. What brand appliance is it installed in?

You have my curiosity peaked and I am trying to find if they ever made that model.
 
  #6  
Old 05-13-08, 04:50 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Maryland
Posts: 72
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Here's some pics

Let's see if this works:




You know, maybe the UL Listing label is just a model # for the label from the UL? Dunno.
 
  #7  
Old 05-13-08, 05:38 PM
plumbingods's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Manch-vegas, New Hampshire
Posts: 2,182
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
OK, now we are getting somewhere

In the top picture it shows it is a model A,AF. If they ever made just a plain "A" model I cannot find it so I am going to say you have an AF burner. It is flame retension, but one of the older styles. With the efficiency you claim to be getting, I would not worry about a thing.
 
  #8  
Old 05-13-08, 07:43 PM
Grady's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Delaware, The First State
Posts: 13,996
Received 11 Votes on 10 Posts
Beckett

It is an AF model. The originally spec'd nozzle was 1.35 x 60
A. I agree with plumbingods. If it is running as well as you say, leave it alone.
 
  #9  
Old 05-14-08, 06:57 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Maryland
Posts: 72
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I appreciate

your feedback.

You don't think efficiencies are to be gained by upgrading to the NX burner?
 
  #10  
Old 05-14-08, 07:14 PM
plumbingods's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Manch-vegas, New Hampshire
Posts: 2,182
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
As I said earlier, your efficiency is not just determined by the burner. It is also the heating appliance that helps to determine the heating efficiency. I don't think you will do much better than what you have now.
 
  #11  
Old 05-14-08, 07:25 PM
Grady's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Delaware, The First State
Posts: 13,996
Received 11 Votes on 10 Posts
Beckett NX

You MIGHT pick up a very little bit of efficiency but the cost of the burner (if available for retro-fit) along with the cost of professional installation would be more than you would ever recover in increased efficiency. If you are really interested in efficiency, you would be better off replacing the boiler.
 
  #12  
Old 05-15-08, 12:20 AM
plumbingods's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Manch-vegas, New Hampshire
Posts: 2,182
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Ya, what Grady said!

H basically said the same thing as me but worded it much better.
 
  #13  
Old 05-15-08, 08:16 AM
Member
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: A Galaxy From Afar
Posts: 421
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
The combustion efficiency of 84-85% is decent. The only way to get it higher would be to go with a condensing boiler. They run in such as way that the flue gases are cooler. This increases the volume of heat extracted from the burner.

For better overall efficiency look into an outdoor reset (ODR) or a control such as the Beckett HeatManager. These devices reduce the water temperature in the boiler when not as much heat is required. This makes a big difference during the cool, but not cold seasons. Which is most of the time.

Al.
 
  #14  
Old 05-25-08, 06:46 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Maryland
Posts: 72
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
My system runs

up to 140 degrees tops before shutting down... I have 2-1/2" main supply and return lines, feeding a total of 9 cast iron radiators (2-story house).

From what I've read, the HeatManager or similar controls with ODR provide the most benefit on large volume systems which run up to 180 degrees.

So would the HM really provide much benefit for me?
 
  #15  
Old 05-26-08, 10:43 AM
Member
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: A Galaxy From Afar
Posts: 421
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
With a max water temperature of 140, they probably won't save much. You could go as low as 120 on the return side. The lowest usable boiler temperature would depend upon the return side temperature.

Does the house maintain temperature even on the coldest days?

Al.
 
  #16  
Old 05-27-08, 03:19 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Maryland
Posts: 72
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Oh yeah... easily

When I first bought the house 11 years ago, I recall several times I had to have the tank refilled twice in one month.

Now, after installing hi-perf windows, an attic blanket, new storm doors and weatherstripping (I also insulated the ceiling of the basement so no heat will travel downward) I only had 3 fillups (just under 600 gallons total) this past year.

One other thing I did was change the setback of the thermostat to only set back 3 degrees (67 to 64). This seems to smooth it out a lot...

Worst case it it'll run 50-60 minutes max, on the coldest days. And that's when recovering in the morning. Once up to temp, it might come on once every few hours for 15-25 minutes.

I'm wondering if going with a fixed setpoint (no setback) and kicking the pump on as the "1st stage" of heating (with the boiler itself being the "2nd stage" might be a good idea.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: