getting chilly


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Old 10-19-08, 04:05 AM
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getting chilly

bought house last year boiler was 1 yr old, smith ,boiler, 2 zones, i started it about 2 weeks ago, seemed ok , but temp was rising , higher than t-stat , furnace was off but it would still keep baseboards hot, set at 70 got to like 82, i figured it was a stuck open zone 1 valve , zone 2 was not turned on at time, any way so i shut it down with e-burner shut off, and put it off till now, now i turned it back on pilot is lit, circulation pump working , zone valves are working , i turn t-stat up , but will not light , just sits there, normally after short delay i will here vent damper open and boiler will light up, now all i hear is circ pump no gas or damper action , pls help..
 
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Old 10-19-08, 04:49 AM
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the vent damper is the lead control there..from the stat that proofs (when it opens) and then the gas burner will come up.the damper might be not making a full swing to open and not closing the circuit for the burner...take a small channel locks and give it a turn to full open on the little damper rod sticking out of the top of the damper assembly.if it is cold up there check the drafting on the opening in the back of the subbase of that stat. if anything below your setpoint is working its way into there the stat will continue to run over the SP
 
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Old 10-19-08, 05:56 AM
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Good morning

Sminker.
Unless I have misunderstood your explanation, the way I read it is the vent damper is the first control, then the thermostat, then the burner. If that is how you meant it to be said, you are wrong.

On a call for heat, the thermostat must complete it's circuit, opening the zone valve, which then sends a signal to the vent damper, telling it to open. Once the vent damper is open, it sends a signal to the burner, telling it that everything is ready and may now open the main burners, provided there is a pilot established.

pOkeys,

What is the temperature on the boiler? If the boiler is up to temp, you should only hear the circulator running, until the boiler temp goes down below the operating temp. If the boiler is cold, I am going to assume the circulator is wired with a RA89A (or similar) control, and will run the circulator separately of the burner circuit and can run all the time once a call for heat is made.
The burner will run until high limit, then shut down until lower than the differential setting of the control.
There should be a control to operate the burner. The vent damper must open first to activate the burner, so in a round about way, the problem may still be the vent damper as it is not opening, and the burner will not operate until the vent damper is open.

The original problem of over temp. , could be caused by a bad zone valve. This cannot be checked until the system is running properly.
 
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Old 10-19-08, 06:46 AM
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I don't always understand sminkers posts either... it's like some foreign language or something. But I've learned to translate into 'homeowner speak'.

One thing that he said is to check where the thermostat is mounted. The wire is gonna come through a hole in the wall. The air inside that wall may be significantly cooler than the air in the room. That cool air flowing out of the wall into the thermostat is gonna fool the t'stat into thinking it needs to keep firing... so, check to make sure that hole is plugged with caulk or insulation or something ....

Pokey, can you show us some pics of the boiler and controls ? you can set up a free account at www.photobucket.com and upload the pics there. Provide a link so we can see the pics...
 
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Old 10-19-08, 06:55 AM
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Funny you mentioned that Trooper,
I once lived in a house where we installed the thermostat on the wall to the stairs leading to the basement, and the wall was not insulated. We were getting mis-readings until we realized what was happening and insulated behind the thermostat.
 
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Old 10-19-08, 07:32 AM
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I bet it's way more common that most people realize...

[thread drift]

at the risk of 'thread drift', I'm gonna tell a story too ...

A friend lived in an up/down duplex... scorched hot air heat... had to set the t'stat at 85° in order to maintain 68 in the unit. And the temp in his unit was all over the place.

Guess where the thermostat was mounted in relation to where the main hot air duct ran upstairs to the other unit ?



[/thread drift]
 
 

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