Oil supply line installation

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Old 10-25-08, 12:10 PM
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Oil supply line installation

I have an above ground, outside tank that supplies #2 fuel oil to a Beckett burner firing an ArcoLiner boiler. I had to move the tank (for reasons unrelated to heating) and at first thought I would replace the existing two-line system with a single line and a Tigerloop. Then I started researching Tigerloops and OSV's and such on this forum and now I'm not so sure of the proper way to hook this thing up.

There's about a 10' drop from the tank to the burner, and the total line length is about 40'. If I understand the Suntec OSV instructions, I can't put one near the tank -- too high above burner -- and putting it next to the burner pump inlet seems pointless. A TigerLoop would make priming easier, but I can't see that de-aerating is helpful since I'd be gravity feeding with no suction.

I do like the idea of a spin-on near the burner and putting the old GF cartridge at the tank outlet. I had planned to use the 3/4” fitting on the end (not bottom) of the tank instead of the top-feed through the double bushing. Is there any problem with the GF filter being outside in the cold?

I hope this isn't rehashing an old question, again. Your advice is always greatly appreciated. Last year, you (Grady and others) were invaluable in helping me install a new combustion chamber and burner in my ArcoLiner.

Thanks,

Randall
 
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Old 10-25-08, 03:11 PM
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Hi thereYou are correct about the single pipe coming off the bottom/end of the tank, but a filter outside is only good if you are in warm weather. Where I live, in NH it is not a good idea as fuel will gel up in the filter to easily. You could however install a GF filter once you enter the foundation to help keep some of the line clean, and put the spin on at the burner.

As far as the OSV (Oil Safety Valve), is concerned, if your tank is 10' above the burner, an OSV is definitely a good idea and may even be required by your building officials. Install it at the burner as a safety for the oil pump. The purpose for this valve is to keep the oil pump seal from blowing out caused by too much pressure. The max pressure an oil pump can take is 10psi on a brand new pump.

This is a copy from Webster pumps OSV installation sheet. In this installation, the OSV will not help in an oil leak from the tank to the burner.


Operation/lnstallation

Webster Oil Safety Valves provide important protection in oil
burner supply systems with pressurized supply lines. By isolating
burner fuel units from supply line pressure sources (a
supply pump or overhead tank, for example), the OSV®
relieves pressure strain on fuel unit inlets and seals.
For this application, the OSV® is installed close to the burner
assembly. A sustained vacuum at the outlet side of the OSV®,
generated by fuel unit operation, causes the valve to open.
 
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Old 10-27-08, 08:58 AM
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Thanks, Mark. Will the Suntec OSV limit the pump inlet pressure as does the Webster? The PRV-38PF conveniently combines the OSV & filter.

And is the Tigerloop in fact not useful in this gravity fed set up?

Thanks again,

Randall
 
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Old 10-27-08, 04:56 PM
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I'm using the Suntec unit here Randall... no problems so far, and I believe the basic idea of the OSV is the same across manufacturers.

You won't really need the TL to deaerate for you, but it will give you an advantage in 'priming' the oil pump. In fact, you may not even ever need to bleed, or prime the pump. Another advantage, particularly with an outdoor above ground tank is that the 'reserve' in the TL will be allowed to warm somewhat as it approaches the burner, and the circulation between the burner and the TL will further warm the oil before it's burned...

Let's put it this way, if you can afford it, it can't hurt... do you _need_ it ? maybe not ...
 
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Old 11-17-08, 07:52 AM
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Thanks, NJ Trooper. I only recently got back to this installation -- I ended up not putting in the Tigerloop (pump did prime easily anyway). 'Thought I would put the money toward a Bacharach combustion analyzer ... would their Fyrite Tech 50 or 60 series be appropriate for an amateur? (I have only two burners to deal with.)

Randall
 
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