Peerless or McClain?????

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Old 10-27-08, 08:23 AM
L
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Wink Peerless or McClain?????

Hi all,

I need your help as I am not educated in this field. I currently have a American Standard--around 50-60 years old-still running, but some puff back problems. I have been told I need a new furnace.

I have gotten the following estimates:

Peerless Pro W/indirect (Crown)----$7300 and $7900
Peerless WBV-03-no indirect-----$5500 and $5900
Weil McClain no indirect ---------$5900

Now can anyone tell me which one is better...ie Weil or Peerless. I am single with a 2000 sq ft house. I don't really need the indirect for the hot water, and if I choose the WBV-03 I could add it later.

Also is it true that I have to put a stainless steel insert in the chimney due to the lower heat, or is the current tile insert ok?

any help appreciated.---I already know that the indirect would save me some money, but being single, it may take some time to recup the costs.

have a great day
 
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Old 10-27-08, 09:19 AM
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peerless

ok, based on all that I have read.

I am going with the peerless and should go with the indirect. Now can someone help me with the model?

WBV vs PRO?????
 
  #3  
Old 10-27-08, 11:12 AM
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Money and brand between these two manufacturers mean little compared to the importance of picking the right installer. The best equipment in the hands of a hack, is junk.

First, the installer should do a heat loss to size the boiler. If he doesn't you can do one yourself, and we're here to help evaluate the numbers you come up with. Free software at www.slantfin.com. The installer should NOT size the boiler based on the one that is there now, nor should he size it based on measuring your baseboard or radiators (special exception on the latter for steam systems, which this is not).

The installer should give you a list of references, which you should check. Chances are the references won't know squat about their heating system, but they can tell you about the installer's timeliness, cleanliness of his work area, efficiency and courtesy in billing, responsiveness to service calls, etc.

The installer should have some pictures of recent installations he's done. You may not know what you're looking at, but the installations should be "clean-looking" by which is meant the piping should be neat and square. There should be plenty of space around the components to allow future service. The electrical wiring, at least near the boiler, should be housed in metal conduit. Pipes and wires should not be running every which way.

From way over here on the other side of the internet, it's impossible to know what size/model boiler might be a good match without knowing the heat loss or at least basic characteristics of the house and general location (region of a state, metro area, whatever).

The need for a stainless liner depends on a bunch of factors. Yes, exhaust temp is one of them. That will be somewhat boiler-dependent. Others can offer better advice about this.
 
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Old 10-27-08, 11:19 AM
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My hot water boiler is older than yours and operates at about 80% efficiency. Why do they tell you that a new one is necessary?

Puff might be caused by impropery adjusted burner or maybe something wrong with the vent/chimney?

I would get a second professional opinion.
Doug
 
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Old 10-27-08, 11:29 AM
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Peerless/Weil

They say the furnace is old and tired. I agree the puff back may be another problem. However it has been explained to me that parts are a problem for it.

Lastly, the waste of energy....here in the northeast--big thing'

I am sure the installers are fine, and the furnace is working, so its not a rush.

I just would like to know if WBV-03 is any better than the PRO.

Yes I know about the heatloss. Although I believe I am getting the smallest furnace. All have agreed the furnace I have is way to big, so they have adjusted me to a smaller furnace.
 
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Old 10-27-08, 05:54 PM
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Boiler Choice

I would suggest the Pro. Since it only holds 3.5 gallons of water, it is going to come up to operating temperatrue faster & there is less water sitting there cooling off when the call for heat is over. I also much prefer a 3 pass design to a pin style boiler, especially in a cold start application.
 
 

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