draining and bleeding my burnham gas furnace

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Old 10-31-08, 07:36 PM
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draining and bleeding my burnham gas furnace

I have a burnham gas furnace PXG2005 A WNI searal # and want to know how to drain and bleed this system ?
 
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Old 11-01-08, 02:51 PM
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This is a hot-water boiler?

There must be a drain valve at a low point of the system. Open that valve and open a vent on one of the highest radiator/convectors.

When you say "bleed," are you wanting to bleed the air?

Why are you wanting to drain the system? Normally not necessary unless the system needs to be opened for repair.
Doug
 
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Old 11-01-08, 07:41 PM
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Draining

Unless draining is needed for a repair, DON'T DO IT. Adding fresh water to a hydronic system is one of the worst things you can do to it.
 
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Old 11-01-08, 08:33 PM
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Why is it bad to add water to a hot water system?
Or change it all together?

Curious as I inadvertently drained my system to make repairs to it.

thanks, Terry
 
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Old 11-01-08, 11:57 PM
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Fresh water has a ton of oxygen in solution ... when you heat that water, all that oxygen starts to get driven out of the water.

Many of the components in the system are ferrous metals. Water + Oxygen + Iron = RUST

If you have to open the system for service, that's one thing, but it happens that sometimes people are under the misconception that it's a GOOD thing to change the water. They're gonna flush all that nasty rusty water out and put in some nice fresh water. But, once they do that, a whole new batch of rust forms, until all the oxygen is driven out and the water becomes inert.

It's always best to drain as little as possible when you do have to drain.
 
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Old 11-02-08, 06:29 AM
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I see, thanks for the explanation.

Terry
 
 

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