Utica boiler settings, need help

Reply

  #1  
Old 11-03-08, 06:17 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 1
Utica boiler settings, need help

Hello, I have a utica boiler model PEG150.It has a pressure gauge and a pressure control box.The boiler runs but no pressure ever shows, the pressure gauge never goes up, what i need to know is what the pressure control setting should be at?
Thanks
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 11-03-08, 06:50 PM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 46
Very low. Less than 2psi.
Is the house warm getting warm? If so, good. I wouldn't expect to get much pressure, if any unless its running for quite some time.
 
  #3  
Old 11-03-08, 06:52 PM
plumbingods's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Manch-vegas, New Hampshire
Posts: 2,182
It is normal to see no pressure reading on a residential steam boiler when cold.
The settings for the steam pressure control should be about 1 with a differential of 2 or 3psi. The boiler should never go above 3psi when running properly. If I am not mistaken, it says on the control, cut-in plus differential equals cut-out

Not getting any pressure readings when running could be caused by a defective or plugged pressure gauge. It could also mean your boiler is too small for the job. It may mean you need to download the free heat loss program from slant fin and see if the boiler is sized properly for your application.
If this is an older boiler, it may need a cleaning or some adjustments to the burner.
 
  #4  
Old 11-03-08, 08:54 PM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 23,539
Upvotes Received: 1
Mark, I'm admittedly 'steam stupid', but aren't steam boilers sized to the installed radiation, rather than to the heat loss of the home, making a heat loss calc a moot point for a steamer?
 
  #5  
Old 11-04-08, 12:34 AM
plumbingods's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Manch-vegas, New Hampshire
Posts: 2,182
Well I've got to be honest here and say I have never sized a steam boiler, just replaced quite a few and serviced them. And I think you may be correct about the radiators governing the boiler size, BUT, the radiators are still sized by the heat loss of the home, I would assume.
 
  #6  
Old 11-04-08, 01:35 PM
rbeck's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 2,444
Upvotes Received: 1
How can you replace steam boilers and not properly size them? They are sized off of connected load (radiation). The answer to control settings are never go over two psi with cast iron radiation. The control should turn off at two and come back on at .5psi. If you have a PA404A control it will not be very accurate. Set it at 2 and see where the boiler shuts off. Maybe turn it down until you can get it to shut off at two or slightly less. The more steam pressure you build the more money it takes. The fuel usage become an exponential growth per pound of steam.
 
  #7  
Old 11-04-08, 02:56 PM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 23,539
Upvotes Received: 1
Originally Posted by plumbingods View Post
BUT, the radiators are still sized by the heat loss of the home, I would assume.
I would too ...

Thing is about that though; if they were sized correctly when the home was built, and the home later insulated, new windows, etc etc ... then the radiators become oversized...

How would one compensate for that in a steam system ? Slower vents ? less pressure ? is there a way ?
 
  #8  
Old 11-04-08, 03:04 PM
plumbingods's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Manch-vegas, New Hampshire
Posts: 2,182
Well fortunately for me, I have never had to size a steam boiler and have only replaced with existing sizes. I am doing one this week, but the owner supplied the boiler, so I will install as asked. But with this fuel cost problem we have, we might be asked more and more to resize all boilers including steam. Of course, if it is efficiency you are striving for, I don't think steam is the best way to go,
 
  #9  
Old 11-06-08, 04:21 PM
rbeck's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 2,444
Upvotes Received: 1
As I stated many times the problems with installations start with boiler sizing. I would never replace any boiler, furnace or A/C without resizing. All existing equipment is over sized.
You cannot put in a smaller steam boiler then the existing radiation. You need the steam to fill all piping and radiation. As far as tighter homes it just stays off a whole lot longer before it comes back on.
Steam is not terrible as far as cost if the pressure is held down, boiler is properly sized, all venting is good, properly piped and pipes are insulated in the basement.
It could be better but for the cost of conversion???????
It would be nice if there was a two stage residential steam boiler. A three pass boiler for efficiency and high/low fire, the high fire builds a head of steam and the low fire will hold steam pressure at about a 40% less input. Getting the system hot is the tough part. After that it is not too hard to keep steam up, providing all the above are correct.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes