Replace gas valve?

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Old 11-20-08, 07:10 PM
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Replace gas valve?

Hey guys,

Found the site when a Google search brought me to this thread.

I have a Peerless PDE-065-WPC-H boiler that isn't igniting. Gas cut-off valve is open, all the status lights come up in sequence when there's a call for heat. Hot surface ignitor comes on and gets up to a brilliant red glow, 24v goes to the gas valve (checked with a multimeter), but no ignition. After a moment it all shuts down, then tries again. After a few cycles it all shuts down until I reset the power and it repeats.

Following the other thread, I measured the resistance across the gas control valve using the ohm setting on my multimeter, and I measured infinite resistance / open circuit. Am I correct that the gas control valve is bad? If so, another question...

I still need to go at it with a flashlight and mirror to find the part number, but if my comparisons to the examples shown in the manual (they show four possible valves for this boiler) it is a Honeywell H-VR8205 - looks like this part is only about $70 online.

Is this a repair a competent DIYer can accomplish? If so, I'd really rather avoid a service call to the HVAC folks.

I'll admit that my experience with gas is limited to hooking up a new stove, but if my guess is right it should be pretty simple.. Thread it in, hookup the two wires, open the cutoff valve, check for leaks with soapy water.. Right?

Thanks for taking the time to reply.
 
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Old 11-21-08, 11:34 AM
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Replacing a gas valve should be within the skill of a handy DIYer.

First, scope out the job - do you have sufficient unions to avoid removing a lot of pipe? You'll need two decently sized pipe wrenches. And pipe dope.

If you can find the exact valve replacement, all is well. Otherwise, you can use a different model if the dimensions and pipe connections are OK.
Doug
 
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Old 11-21-08, 07:10 PM
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Originally Posted by gilmorrie View Post
Replacing a gas valve should be within the skill of a handy DIYer.

First, scope out the job - do you have sufficient unions to avoid removing a lot of pipe? You'll need two decently sized pipe wrenches. And pipe dope.
I think so. On each side of the valve there's a length of pipe, a large nut, and another length of pipe. Looks like I can turn the nuts and back the pipe out of the valve. Those are the unions, right? Not much clearance on the outlet side, but plenty of room to do the inlet side first and free up some working space.

Originally Posted by gilmorrie View Post
If you can find the exact valve replacement, all is well. Otherwise, you can use a different model if the dimensions and pipe connections are OK.
Doug
I've found the exact valve. I was hoping it was the VR8205 I read about in the manual, since I can get that one NOS for $22, but the valve in the boiler now is a VR8305M4801. Looks like it's just a replacement for the retired 8205, but it has a 3/4" outlet where the 8205 has a 1/2" and I would feel more comfortable doing this if I don't have to try and rework the plumbing to fit an adapter in. Here's my last question, though.. I've read about adjusting the gas flow for the valve, and I see this valve can supply anywhere from 30 - 300k BTUs. Is there some trick to figuring out the proper flow?
 
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Old 11-21-08, 07:32 PM
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...but it has a 3/4" outlet where the 8205 has a 1/2" and I would feel more comfortable doing this if I don't have to try and rework the plumbing to fit an adapter in.
The new valve likely comes with a 3/4 by 1/2 inch reducer that will add no more than 1/4 inch overall to the valve, maybe less.

I've read about adjusting the gas flow for the valve, and I see this valve can supply anywhere from 30 - 300k BTUs. Is there some trick to figuring out the proper flow?
The flow is dependent upon the orifices installed in the burner and the pressure of the gas. The gas valve has a regulator built in but you will need a manometer to adjust it. You can also install it and while the burner is operating "clock" your gas meter (no other gas-using appliances in use) by recording the time it takes for the meter to pass one cubic foot of gas. One cubic foot of gas is equal to about 1,000 BTUs and you just do the arithmetic.
 
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