Installing hot water baseboard

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Old 11-25-08, 09:16 AM
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Cool Installing hot water baseboard

I want to install some hot water baseboard sections into an existing loop hot water radiator system.I know it would be unever heat but in my circumastances it's better than nothing.Would I just use some supply T's tied into the existing loop?
 
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Old 11-25-08, 12:32 PM
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How much radiation do you need and will it be in 1 room or scattered around the house? Your not supposed to mix cast iron radiators with copper finned baseboard but you might be able to install cast iron baseboard instead. I believe Burnham still makes cast iron baseboard, its not cheap but if you only need a couple of sections it might work in your application. Give this post a couple of days I am sure you will get some good advice.
 
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Old 11-25-08, 12:42 PM
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Thanks for the quick reply.I've never worked with baseboard heat so I'm in the dark. Why can't you mix the radiators with the copper baseboard ? My supply lines right up to radiators in the loop are copper,always been that way.
 
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Old 11-25-08, 09:21 PM
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I think it depends on where and how much you want to put in.

Baseboard heats, and cools rapidly compared to cast iron rads, so if you had say two rooms on one circuit, one with baseboard, and one with rads ... the room with baseboard would probably get warmer faster, and also cool faster. The room with rads might tend to heat more slowly, but when it got up to temp, it would stay there longer because of the stored heat.

Thermostat placement would be a problem in such a case. Whichever room you put it in, the temps would be outta balance in the other room ... that's where the 'uneven' part comes in.

I don't really see a problem though if for example, you had a few rads in a room, and you wanted to add a few feet of baseboard, might actually be a good idea ! Room might warm faster, but stay warm longer ... _maybe_ ...

Tell us more about your plan ... describe what you are thinking about doing.
 
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Old 11-26-08, 05:35 AM
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Thanks for the reply. What I want to do is put the baseboard heat in a unheated insulated enclosed pourch where the laundry room is. Right now any heat comes from the doorway off the livingroom.It get cold in there but never freezing,so I figure any heat out there would actually keep more heat in the livingroom and not give you a wake up call when you go to do the laundry. The room is 8x22 and I want to put it around the outside wall of course tying into the loop with supply T's.Would it be reasonable to use a zone valve and seperate thermostat out there to better control the temp?
Thanks,
Joe
 
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Old 11-26-08, 12:51 PM
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I think you are right, this room deserves to be on a separate zone because it is a porch and most likely will heat up and cool down quicker than the rest of the house so why bother trying to keep it the same temperature as the rest of the house. If you wanted to do it on the cheap you might be able to tap into the existing heating zone but I would recomend cutting the supply tee into the supply line closest to the boiler so that it receives the hottest water.

I have seen this done before where a plumber installed a run of baseboard heat (Approx. 16 feet ) into an existing heat zone with cast iron rads and I believe the he used a mono-flow tee for that room to ensure that hot water was forced into that run of baseboard. He also cut the supply tee closest to the boiler. I'm not partial to this way of doing it but I have seen it done and it did work OK so the decision is yours.
 
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Old 11-26-08, 04:46 PM
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I think it makes sense for that to be a separate zone also ...

If you have cheap electric, it's also probably a good place for some electric baseboard ...

If it's a zone, either hydronic or electric, the fact that it's an occasional use area means that most of the time, you could save some $$ by turning that zone way down ... say 50 or so ... or lower if there's no danger of plumbing or other stuff freezing... then an hour before laundry time, kick it up ...

If it happens to be the ONLY zone calling, your boiler might run a few short cycles getting it up to temp ... but for occasional use, that would probably be acceptable ...

Can ya take some pictures ?
 
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