Replacement hot water coil question

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  #1  
Old 11-26-08, 05:37 PM
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Replacement hot water coil question

I have a 21 year old peerless boiler that has a leak in the hot water coil. This leak is causing my boiler pressure to increase and the domestic hot water is mixing with the hot water located inside the boiler.
The service person wants to replace the coil.
He said that if the bolts break off when removing the old coil he would drill them out and retap the hole.
Can anyone tell me what the risks are to this type of repair?
 
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  #2  
Old 11-26-08, 06:54 PM
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On an old boiler there is always the risk that a stud might snap. I have done them before and I would suggest spraying the nuts and studs with a rust penetrant ( PB Blaster, Liquid Wrench, etc.) daily for 1 week before attempting to remove them. Heating up each nut with a torch just prior to removing them also helps.
 
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Old 11-27-08, 12:41 AM
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On a 21 year-old boiler it is almost a certainty that at least one stud (and maybe several) will break. Drilling out the stud can be labor intensive and it will often result in a larger hole in the casting and that, depending on several variables, could weaken the surrounding part of the stud.

Quite honestly, you would be re-installing what I consider to be a method of heating domestic water only slightly better than a kettle on a wood-burning kitchen range. I would opt for either a totally independent electric or gas water heater or have an indirect heater installed to your boiler. The latter could also be used if/when you replace the boiler.
 
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Old 11-27-08, 05:08 PM
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Furd is right. Abandon the coil and never let the thought of another coiled boiler or a boiler that maintains hot water ever enter your mind again. It is the worst way to make hot water.
 
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Old 11-27-08, 05:21 PM
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How would one treat the leaking coil if it were abandoned ?

I know that indirect manufacturers caution to NOT cap the unused coil ports ... leave them open ... I guess if you cap a non leaking coil, pressure can build... bang!

But if it's a leaker, you have to cap them, right ? and because it's a leaker, pressure can't build in the coil any higher than in the boiler, correct ? So it's safe to cap a leaking coil then ?
 
  #6  
Old 11-27-08, 05:40 PM
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Originally Posted by furd View Post
I would opt for either a totally independent electric or gas water heater or have an indirect heater installed to your boiler. The latter could also be used if/when you replace the boiler.
What is a indirect heater and how would it install to my boiler?

I am trying to save on costs at this time. I thought of adding an electric water heater (there is no gas in my neighborhood) then I would need to call a electrician to add a 220 line.
Would anyone what capacity water heater you would need for a four person household?
We wash clothes with cold water so hot water would mostly be for baths and dishwashing.
 

Last edited by mrbizness1; 11-27-08 at 06:02 PM.
  #7  
Old 11-27-08, 05:57 PM
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Originally Posted by NJ Trooper View Post
How would one treat the leaking coil if it were abandoned ?

I know that indirect manufacturers caution to NOT cap the unused coil ports ... leave them open ... I guess if you cap a non leaking coil, pressure can build... bang!

But if it's a leaker, you have to cap them, right ? and because it's a leaker, pressure can't build in the coil any higher than in the boiler, correct ? So it's safe to cap a leaking coil then ?
That is what happened to my boiler. I found my boiler pressure indicater at 70psi. When I let out some water it went back to 70 within 5 minutes. I put a ball valve at the coil line into the boiler to shut it off. When I need hot water now I open up the coil line valve and then open a boiler drain valve to let out the excess pressure. I replaced the expansion tank and relief valve.



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  #8  
Old 11-27-08, 07:24 PM
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Two things trouble me about the last posts...

First, you do realize that boiler water is getting into your domestic hot water system, right? That's just plain unhealthwise, not to mention not good for ya ! Who knows what heebie-jeebies are growing in that boiler water ? Yeah, yeah, I know it's too hot for that ... sure ... Dr. House could find somethin' make ya sick in there I bet !

Second, how on earth is your boiler getting up to 70 PSI ? That's more than TWICE the pressure of the relief valve! Once that ole boiler hit 30 PSI, the relief valve should have reported.

Ok, three things... did it not once occur to any of the techs that worked on your system to suggest that you replace that NM wiring to the boiler with MC armored cable? Is it not code on LI?

----

side note: mrbiz, PM me if you figured out what causes those stains on your roof ...
 

Last edited by NJT; 11-27-08 at 08:42 PM.
  #9  
Old 11-27-08, 08:57 PM
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Originally Posted by NJ Trooper View Post
Two things trouble me about the last posts...

I have 2 problems, the coil leak and also a slab leak. When I saw the water meter turning and the radiator getting warm I never thought about a coil leak. After I stopped the slab leak it was then I found the coil leak and the pressure going to 70 I have replaced the pressure valve and the expansion tank as well.
Until I replace the coil we only get cold water from the 2 handle faucets, I don't want to drink any boiler water.
Finding online info and sellers of heating coils is impossible.

Thanks for the reply.
----
 

Last edited by NJT; 11-28-08 at 05:48 PM.
  #10  
Old 11-28-08, 03:42 AM
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Last year I abandoned my tankless coil and installed a 56 gallon electric water heater. Has been a great decision, never run out of hot water and used no oil for 5 months with a increase in my electric bill of maybe $30 per month.
I capped off the coil but installed a 30psi preesure relief valve on the coil just in case. I did the install myself including the electrical and spent less than $400.
 
  #11  
Old 11-28-08, 04:27 PM
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Originally Posted by angelo1100 View Post
Last year I abandoned my tankless coil and installed a 56 gallon electric water heater. Has been a great decision, never run out of hot water and used no oil for 5 months with a increase in my electric bill of maybe $30 per month.
I capped off the coil but installed a 30psi preesure relief valve on the coil just in case. I did the install myself including the electrical and spent less than $400.

Just curious, what state you live in? Where I am the electric rates are near the highest in the country.
 
  #12  
Old 11-28-08, 06:56 PM
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I live in RI and have National Grid as my supplier. The total cost per kWh delivered is an outrageous 17.39 cents. I used 624 kWh last month with a 109.00 bill plus a few add ons to total 116.63. I used 578 for the same period last year. The differences are, last year hot water was from the tankless coil, 1 more child off to college and a very warm October.
I compared electric bills and the fairest comparison is the June bill which was 184 kWh more than the previous year which came out to $31.00 more. This is with both kids home from college, no AC or heat and everybody gets 1 hot shower a day.
Amount of oil used was zero. Even if I only used .5 gal of oil a day to keep the boiler hot, I saved $60 in oil assuming the $4. price of oil at the time.
 
  #13  
Old 12-01-08, 04:18 PM
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I want to thank everyone for their input. I ended up replacing the coil. The electric hot water would have been much more costly because I would have had to get a electrician to wire up a 220 line and that would have required a upgraded electric service box.
I was able to loosen the coil bolts a little and spray them with liquid wrench. Every few hours I would do a little more spraying and loosening.
FYI Anyone needing a replacement coil needs to shop around. I found them online for $275.00
at Sid Harvey for $300.00
Blackman $165.00
thanks again
 
  #14  
Old 12-08-08, 06:29 AM
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Smile mrbizzness1 Help

I saw your fyi on the coil price. We are in the same bind as you with our 19 yeat old boiler needing a new coil for the tankless on demand hot water. Same situation, to do anything else will cost more, and my husband can do the coil himself, with my Dad who has lot of plumbing experience. We are shopping around for coils and have not found one cheaper than $300. I live in NH, and would love to find one for under $200, any advice as to where I should go. I am not sure where blackman is. We have a New Yorker boiler. I am so glad I saw your feed, we agree, the coil is the easiest an cheapest way for us to go to. Thanks,
Jess
 
  #15  
Old 12-08-08, 07:23 PM
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Originally Posted by 5lockes View Post
I saw your fyi on the coil price. We are in the same bind as you with our 19 yeat old boiler needing a new coil for the tankless on demand hot water. Same situation, to do anything else will cost more, and my husband can do the coil himself, with my Dad who has lot of plumbing experience. We are shopping around for coils and have not found one cheaper than $300. I live in NH, and would love to find one for under $200, any advice as to where I should go. I am not sure where blackman is. We have a New Yorker boiler. I am so glad I saw your feed, we agree, the coil is the easiest an cheapest way for us to go to. Thanks,
Jess

This link is to the store where I bought the coil.

Blackman - Medford

This is the name of the company that is listed on the box.
Central water heat and sales corp. 718 417 9700

Blackman has many Long Island locations, perhaps they would ship one to you.
The one I bought was for a Peerless JOT model 5gpm coil.
good luck
 
  #16  
Old 12-16-08, 04:46 PM
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Originally Posted by angelo1100 View Post
I live in RI and have National Grid as my supplier. The total cost per kWh delivered is an outrageous 17.39 cents. I used 624 kWh last month with a 109.00 bill plus a few add ons to total 116.63. I used 578 for the same period last year. The differences are, last year hot water was from the tankless coil, 1 more child off to college and a very warm October.
I compared electric bills and the fairest comparison is the June bill which was 184 kWh more than the previous year which came out to $31.00 more. This is with both kids home from college, no AC or heat and everybody gets 1 hot shower a day.
Amount of oil used was zero. Even if I only used .5 gal of oil a day to keep the boiler hot, I saved $60 in oil assuming the $4. price of oil at the time.

I have LIPA which is now National Grid I think. Here is a copy of my current bill which works out to be .204 cents per kWh. Most of the electric on Long Island is generated with oil. When the prices sky rocked a few months ago they naturally blamed the fuel costs. Then people conserved. Now that fuel costs have dropped they said they need to raise rates because people are still conserving and they are bringing in less revenue. Either way the consumer loses.

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  #17  
Old 12-18-08, 11:54 AM
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I'm on LI too ...

I am resesrching information regarding this subject - but it sounds like you, OP (original poster), have Hot-water heat? Am I correct?

Reason I ask is this - we are considering replacing our in boiler coil with a separate electric HW heater. But in out case the main reason is that we are concerned with house flooding in case the coil springs a leak.

We have a steam system with the in boiler coil and would like to know the ramifications of the coil breaking. Can someone answer this for us?

Other than that, we are pretty happy with the coil. We've lived with elec HW htrs too, and both systems have advantages and disadvantages, as we see it.

Now one other thing ... as long as I'm talking about flooding - we know that a WAGS device can be used with a Gas HW htr, to prevent localized (i.e.: basement) flooding. But is such a device available for electric HW htrs? Thanks,

~Bill
 
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Old 12-18-08, 02:14 PM
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If the domestic hot water coil in a steam boiler were to break (leak is probably more likely) the boiler would completely fill with water and as soon as the temperature dropped below the aquastat low setting the burner would fire. The pressure would rise quickly and cause the safety valve to open, spewing out water. The pressure would continue to rise and flood all the piping to the radiators and then spill out the air vents. It would make one grand mess.

Now one other thing ... as long as I'm talking about flooding - we know that a WAGS device can be used with a Gas HW htr, to prevent localized (i.e.: basement) flooding. But is such a device available for electric HW htrs? Thanks,
I don't know what a WAGS device is but if you are asking if motorized shut-off valves that close when water is detected by a sensor are available for electric water heaters, the answer is yes. Understand that if the power goes out for some reason they won't close.

And as for advantages to having tankless coils in boilers for domestic water...the ONLY advantage is they take up no space and are cheap. I wouldn't have a tankless coil in a boiler if you paid me to have one.
 
  #19  
Old 12-18-08, 02:17 PM
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Thanks!

Unfortunately that is exaclty what I thought the threat would be. A (W)ater (A)nd (G)as (S)hutoff is what I meant. I have not tracked any for water only. Can you direct me? THanks again.
 
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Old 12-18-08, 02:33 PM
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  #21  
Old 12-18-08, 02:36 PM
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Originally Posted by dartley View Post
I am resesrching information regarding this subject - but it sounds like you, OP (original poster), have Hot-water heat? Am I correct?

Reason I ask is this - we are considering replacing our in boiler coil with a separate electric HW heater. But in out case the main reason is that we are concerned with house flooding in case the coil springs a leak.

We have a steam system with the in boiler coil and would like to know the ramifications of the coil breaking. Can someone answer this for us?

Other than that, we are pretty happy with the coil. We've lived with elec HW htrs too, and both systems have advantages and disadvantages, as we see it.

Now one other thing ... as long as I'm talking about flooding - we know that a WAGS device can be used with a Gas HW htr, to prevent localized (i.e.: basement) flooding. But is such a device available for electric HW htrs? Thanks,

~Bill
I am not an expert but the coil that broke was in the boiler for almost 20 years. When the leak was discovered I put a ball valve in the coil line to prevent the boiler from leaking. I suppose I should have put in a shut off for the new
coil but I didn't. The old coil leaked near a bend in the copper so it probably was a weak spot.
I expect my children to be moving into their own apartments soon, so there will be less half hour showers in my home. This also affected my decision to replace the existing coil.




 
  #22  
Old 12-18-08, 03:23 PM
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Mrbiz, you didn't ask but you have some serious wiring concerns on that boiler.
 
  #23  
Old 12-19-08, 12:58 AM
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Originally Posted by furd View Post
Mrbiz, you didn't ask but you have some serious wiring concerns on that boiler.

What are the serious wire concerns?
Someone remarked about romex. Can I replace the wiring myself?
 
  #24  
Old 12-19-08, 06:50 AM
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Thanks again!

Originally Posted by furd View Post

I wonder if I could add one of these to my existing system and just leave the coil in. As I said - I've lived with an electric HW tank and with the current coil - both have advantages and disadvantages (from an end users point of view / not from a plumbers point of view). The coil makes enough water for the two of us. And although you use the boiler in the warm months, you don't need an additional energy source in the cold months. My ONLY concern with the coil is as I mentioned - house damage. My coil is probably at least 30 years old.

~Bill
 
  #25  
Old 12-19-08, 01:49 PM
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If you're really that concerned I suggest that you look into the Water Cop and install it on the main water line coming into the house. You can then install multiple sensors at points where a leak would activate the motorized valve turniong off all water in the house.
 

Last edited by NJT; 12-19-08 at 04:32 PM.
  #26  
Old 12-26-08, 03:37 PM
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I just read all of the messages on this subject and find I am in a similar situation. About a month ago, my pressure relief valve opened and I ended up with a small flood (gauge showed 30 psig). My burner repair tech replaced the valve (also the auto top-off valve, the pressure-temperature gauge and the little pressure valve above the expansion tank).

Today again, there was leakage from the new pressure relief valve (gauge again indicated 30 psig). At the recommendation of my tech, I completely closed off the manual fill valve and observed the gauge. The pressure dropped to 0 psig and the domestic hot water was non-existent according to my daughter (brrrr!). It will make her a better human being, I hope!

My tech believes the coil is bad, which is likely since it is probably the original one installed with the Weill-McClain furnace around 1985. My tech says it will cost approx $425 for him to replace. The question I have, after reading the below posts, is if this is better today than installing a new electric heater (I already have the 240VAC supply since originally my house was all electric (built approx 1975) or an indirect hot water heater? I don't know which would be better, both from an initial cost standpoint or from an installation and long term operational cost?

I live on Long Island, like mrbizness1, and pay approx $0.20-0.22/kWh for electricity and, now that oil has dropped off, we are down to less than $2.00/gal for fuel oil. I did a quick calculation and it looks like a wash between the cost of electricity and oil.

Any recommendations would be appreciated!

Joe
 
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Old 12-27-08, 08:17 AM
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Originally Posted by onamor View Post
I just read all of the messages on this subject and find I am in a similar situation. About a month ago, my pressure relief valve opened and I ended up with a small flood (gauge showed 30 psig). My burner repair tech replaced the valve (also the auto top-off valve, the pressure-temperature gauge and the little pressure valve above the expansion tank).

Today again, there was leakage from the new pressure relief valve (gauge again indicated 30 psig). At the recommendation of my tech, I completely closed off the manual fill valve and observed the gauge. The pressure dropped to 0 psig and the domestic hot water was non-existent according to my daughter (brrrr!). It will make her a better human being, I hope!

Any recommendations would be appreciated!
Joe

Is it possible you have a leak in another part of your system which is causing you to lose pressure. I ask because there is a month between services by your tech and in my case the manual fill valve wasn't causing the pressure to increase it was the coil leaking into the boiler. On my boiler the water goes into the coil before the fill valve.
My home is on a slab, when ever I suspect a leak in the heat pipes I turn off the fill valve and the pressure drops even with a good coil.
The best way to check is to install a ball valve going into the coil.
By the way ball valves seem to have shot up in price at Home Depot very fast, I paid $6.82 + tax for a 3/8 valve yesterday.
 
  #28  
Old 12-28-08, 08:58 AM
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Replacement hot water coil question

Originally Posted by mrbizness1 View Post
Is it possible you have a leak in another part of your system which is causing you to lose pressure. I ask because there is a month between services by your tech and in my case the manual fill valve wasn't causing the pressure to increase it was the coil leaking into the boiler. On my boiler the water goes into the coil before the fill valve.
My home is on a slab, when ever I suspect a leak in the heat pipes I turn off the fill valve and the pressure drops even with a good coil.
The best way to check is to install a ball valve going into the coil.
By the way ball valves seem to have shot up in price at Home Depot very fast, I paid $6.82 + tax for a 3/8 valve yesterday.

Thanks for your reply. I don't think there is a leak elsewhere in the system. As I read your reply though, it is starting to add up and make sense to me. My system is similar to yours in the old photo below except with BX cable. The auto-fill valve does not appear to be the cause of the high pressure. This leaves me with the assumption that it is the coil leaking into the boiler tank that is causing the high pressure and the opening of the pressure-relief valve. This now seems to confirm something else to me. In the past, when it is quiet at night, I have wondered why my burner appears to short cycle (on for 2 minutes, off for 3 minutes) especially on very cold days and this occurred around the clock. Would I be wrong to believe now that a leak from the coil into the boiler tank would add cold water from the domestic water system directly into the heating water tank, thereby causing the heating water to drop in temperature faster than otherwise might be the case when the heating water is circulating around the house baseboards?

If I am correct in my assumption, changing the coil out would give me 3 pluses: 1) more consistent domestic hot water, 2) reduced pressure in the tank without leakage from the PRV and 3) reduced short cycling of the burner trying to keep the heating water hot when there is demand for heat (reduced fuel oil usage). Am I all wet on my assumptions or am I heading in the right direction?

Thanks!

P.S. Since you are from Mt. Sinai and I am from Smithtown, it would be funny if we had the same furnace tech?!?!?!
 
  #29  
Old 12-28-08, 12:56 PM
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Originally Posted by onamor View Post
Thanks for your reply. I don't think there is a leak elsewhere in the system. As I read your reply though, it is starting to add up and make sense to me. My system is similar to yours in the old photo below except with BX cable. The auto-fill valve does not appear to be the cause of the high pressure. This leaves me with the assumption that it is the coil leaking into the boiler tank that is causing the high pressure and the opening of the pressure-relief valve. This now seems to confirm something else to me. In the past, when it is quiet at night, I have wondered why my burner appears to short cycle (on for 2 minutes, off for 3 minutes) especially on very cold days and this occurred around the clock. Would I be wrong to believe now that a leak from the coil into the boiler tank would add cold water from the domestic water system directly into the heating water tank, thereby causing the heating water to drop in temperature faster than otherwise might be the case when the heating water is circulating around the house baseboards?

If I am correct in my assumption, changing the coil out would give me 3 pluses: 1) more consistent domestic hot water, 2) reduced pressure in the tank without leakage from the PRV and 3) reduced short cycling of the burner trying to keep the heating water hot when there is demand for heat (reduced fuel oil usage). Am I all wet on my assumptions or am I heading in the right direction?

Thanks!

P.S. Since you are from Mt. Sinai and I am from Smithtown, it would be funny if we had the same furnace tech?!?!?!
I've had a few slap leaks before this coil leak and they both would turn on the boiler for a short time. With a slab leak the heat would be on without the circulator running. I spend alot of time looking at the water meter.
I didn't call my oil burner service tech for this job, I used a family friend who is a plumber. He was going away for Thanksgiving, he stopped at my home figured what the problem was, added the ball valve so I could turn on and off the water when I needed it and went away. He told me where to get the new coil which saved me almost $100.00 over other price quotes. By Sunday I had the coil bolts loose using liquid wrench, he stopped by replaced the coil and changed the plumbing lines and was done in two hours.
He does a very thorough job and cleans up everything before he leaves.
 
  #30  
Old 01-15-09, 04:10 PM
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mrbiz,

Does the coil come straight out once the perimeter bolts are removed? Anything else need to be removed? I have to attempt a coil replacement soon as mine seems to have a greatly reduced heating capacity...hard water does wonders over years. TIA
 
  #31  
Old 01-16-09, 03:07 PM
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Originally Posted by wylee View Post
mrbiz,

Does the coil come straight out once the perimeter bolts are removed? Anything else need to be removed? I have to attempt a coil replacement soon as mine seems to have a greatly reduced heating capacity...hard water does wonders over years. TIA
The coil slides out easily. My water shut off at the meter is 30 years old so I added a ball valve to shut the water off. I also removed the aquastat.
The new coil makes the water super hot. If I would have had more time I would have found a way to flush out the inside of the boiler. The water and residue inside it is disgusting. Its like wet mud.
good luck
 
  #32  
Old 02-16-09, 11:28 AM
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I have a Burnham V-14A-T with a 6gpm coil. Like others in the thread, I need a new hot water coil in the boiler (it's clogged). The repair guy quoted me $950. He said the bolts will probably break (like previously mentioned in this thread), and that will complicate the job. After he left, I grabbed a socket wrench and easily turned all the bolts. That got me seriously thinking about a DIY. I expect the job to go like this. Someone please tell me if I'm missing anything:

- Turn off water and drain the pipes.
- Cut the inlet and outlet copper pipes.
- Unthread the inlet and outlet flanges from the coil.
- Remove the 8 bolts holding in the coil, and slide it out.
- Slide in the new coil, tighten the bolts, and thread the flanges back in.
- Solder the pipes back together with straight fittings.

Can it really be that easy, considering the $950 repair quote, or am I just totally missing something? From what I can tell on the outside, the coil looks like this:

 
  #33  
Old 02-16-09, 12:14 PM
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Yes, if everything goes perfectly it can be that simple. Be sure to clean all the gasket surfaces before reassembly and I would suggest unions to facilitate coil replacement in the future.

Don't forget to turn off the power to the boiler, let it cool and then drain it BEFORE removing the coil.

You will, of course, need to refill the boiler and bleed the air from the heating system after you complete the coil replacement.

Good luck.
 
  #34  
Old 02-16-09, 02:50 PM
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I would cover the burner motor and any switches with plastic, when you remove the coil a lot of junk comes out with it.
 
  #35  
Old 02-16-09, 04:41 PM
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If you've got shutoff valves on the individual zones and such, close them to isolate as much of the piping as you can. The less water you have to drain, the better. If you are lucky, you may have valves that you can close and only have to drain a few gallons... when you refill, make sure to purge the air out of the boiler before you fire it up.

Pics might help us tell you which valves to twist... and possibly give more specific answers...

free account at Image hosting, free photo sharing & video sharing at Photobucket / upload pics there / drop link here so we can view your album...
 
  #36  
Old 02-16-09, 04:45 PM
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Tighten bolts as evenly as possible... if you have a torque wrench, so much the better... then, after it's been installed for a month or so, retorque the bolts...
 
  #37  
Old 02-17-09, 02:05 PM
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Location: Tolland, CT
Posts: 6
Thanks guys, I took all of your advice, and the install went smooth - or so I thought. After the coil was installed, the bolts were torqued down, the pipes were welded, and it was refilled, I powered it up. Before turning it on, the pressure was 15 PSI. After a few minutes the temp was 160 and the pressure rose to 20 PSI. There were no leaks, the water was hot and the hot water pressure was great. I thought all was fine, so I cleaned up my tools and went upstairs. When I went down to check on it again 30 minutes later, the temp was at 230 and there was hissing coming from the back of the boiler. I assume that's too hot. The pressure was still 20 PSI, but there was water dripping out of the emergency relief pipe in the back. I shut it down, and now I'm at a loss. The temp probe appears to be inserted into the coil properly.

Perhaps I didn't refill it right? The radiators are baseboards with no apparent bleed screws. There is a spigot with a garden hose connection at both the bottom of the boiler, and just before the return line enters the boiler, so I figured I could flush water through the system to get rid of the air. I don't see how this could cause to overheat though.

Any ideas? Right now we have no heat and it's going to be a cold night, so any quick help is greatly appreciated.
 
  #38  
Old 02-17-09, 02:59 PM
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Tolland, CT
Posts: 6
I just figured out that I didn't get all of the air out of the system. When flushing the water through, I opened the valve to send that water out the hose, but didn't close the one right under it to stop it from going back into the boiler. I think there was so much air left in the system, that when the circulator pump when on, the boiler ended up only half full. I'm now flushing it out real good, then I'll fill the boiler and repeat the process to make sure there's no air. I'm still afraid to turn on the flame.

Side note - the coil cost $185, saving me $765 off the quote given to me by my oil service company. The job took a casual 3-1/2 hours with a couple of beer breaks, but I could do it in 1-1/2 if I had to do it again. Well worth it (assuming it's going to now work).

Still any suggestions or comments are very welcome, especially if I'm doing something wrong (wouldn't be the first time).
 
  #39  
Old 02-17-09, 03:24 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Mt. Sinai N.Y.
Posts: 187
At this point I would hook a hose to the boiler drain valve and open the heat zone drain valves one at a time until all the bubbles are out.
 
  #40  
Old 02-17-09, 03:42 PM
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Tolland, CT
Posts: 6
There's only one zone, and that's what I did. There's no more air in the system, but it's still overheating for some reason. It went up to 220F before I shut it off. I'm stumped, and feeling a bit defeated. What would make a boiler overheat like this?
 
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