New oil tank and shrilling oil return line

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Old 12-01-08, 10:12 PM
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New oil tank and shrilling oil return line

Last week, we had our underground oil tank dug up and replaced with a 275 Roth tank in our basement. For the first 2 days all was OK. Then the return line from our boiler has started to vibrate so much that it shrieks through out the house. This never happened prior to replacing the oil tank. The only way we can get a night's rest is to turn the heat off for the night.

When I called the contractor to come out, he said to try closing down on the valve to the return line a little bit, that 95% of the time that will solve the problem. A heating contractor I called said that the flow should not be reduced. Is the shrilling of the line due to air somehow entered the line?

Our boiler is probably 40+ years old, runs inefficiently but heats the house OK. The new lines run overhead while the old ones ran along the floor. The tank is about 8 feet from the boiler.

The contractor did a good job removing the underground tank though I am not so sure of their expertise now in dealing with our heating system. Any ideas about what is wrong and how to correct it? We are puzzled as to why the first couple of days the system ran OK and then began with all the noise.
 
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Old 12-02-08, 10:59 AM
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Possible solution

I would have your oil heat company come out and look at the air intake of the tank. Also a check valve on the inlet of the pump usually cures the problem. Had same issue and the air inlet was clogged. This would be the pipe outside that allows tank to breath. This should be covered on your oil burner maintenance

Hope this helps
 
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Old 12-02-08, 11:55 AM
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This is not really all that unusual with overhead oil lines. Personally, I would remove the return line and install a Tiger Loop (oil deaerator) at the burner. Roth recommends either 2-pipe or deaerator when using their tank.
 
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Old 12-02-08, 12:17 PM
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tigerloop

Thank you for the info. The contractor just called and can't come out until Friday aft. If it's air in the lines, is that adding stress to our boiler system? Also, we have been turning the heat off every night so we can sleep and then the system runs for hours to heat the house back up in the morning which I am thinking is probably stressing or overworking an old boiler? It's been almost a week already...are we risking complications also?
 
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Old 12-02-08, 12:44 PM
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possible solution

Thanks for the help. What is the check valve on the inlet of the pump? Is this something that needs to be added on or is it there and needs adjustment?
 
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Old 12-02-08, 01:30 PM
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If that is truly a check valve at the pump inlet it shouldn't be there. Depending on where you live what might be required is a Firomatic oil valve. That's a spring loaded shut off. The handle has a fusible insert that allows the valve to pull closed if there is a fire where there shouldn't be and cut off the oil supply.
 
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Old 12-02-08, 03:56 PM
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Return Line Noise

I concur with Heatpro in his suggestion of a fuel deaerator. The days of two line systems are gone.
 
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Old 12-03-08, 05:40 AM
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Osv

Thank you for the help! The Contractor is now saying they will install a Tiger Loop when they come out Friday. I was looking at the lines and saw the Fireomatic though nothing else. Should they be installing an OSV also? If we end up replacing the boiler this winter, since the newer units are so much smaller than my 40+ year old one, would the valve have to be relocated with the new boiler?
 
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Old 12-03-08, 07:09 PM
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Osv

An oil safety valve is required in some areas but not others you would have to check with the local code officals. Any time there is the potential for a siphon or gravity flow of oil from a broken line, an OSV is a good idea.

If you are still having to shut the heat off at night, check that overhead fuel line. If it is tight against the floor joists, remove whatever is holding it there. If you get it away from the wood, I'd bet your noise goes away. You can put a nail in every third joist & suspend the line with wire. This is not the right way but at least you could have heat at night until the contractor installs the Tiger Loop.
 
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