How to replace a 125 psi relief valve?


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Old 01-04-09, 07:33 AM
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How to replace a 125 psi relief valve?

1. Could you tell me how to replace a 125 psi relief valve conected in the inlet of the steam-hot water boiler peerless, please see de picture.
2. Is it posible to replace only the inside part of a regular valve (no relief) is leaking too and I don't want to remove it because of the wellding (see picture).
3. Is the valve showed in the picture the valve that I have to open to drain the dirty water and how frecuenly do I have to do it.
Here the pictures:
lata4201 - Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
 

Last edited by Lata4201; 01-04-09 at 08:49 AM. Reason: add pictures
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Old 01-04-09, 08:03 AM
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ONE HUNDRED TWENTY FIVE PSI?

I don't think so... better put on yer glasses...

What pictures? None showed...

To post pictures you have to set up a free account at Image hosting, free photo sharing & video sharing at Photobucket and upload the pictures there. Come back here and post a link to the album and we'll take a look.
 
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Old 01-04-09, 08:33 AM
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Old 01-04-09, 09:18 AM
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1. You would need to drain the boiler, remove the valve and install the new one. However... that should NOT NOT NOT be a 125 PSI relief valve! ! !
[edit: wrong answer, see post from OldGrouchy below.]

I believe it will be THIRTY PSI part ... please don't blow yourself up by installing the wrong valve. If you are uncertain about this, please consult a professional!

2. You may not have to replace anything on that valve... just below the handle, there is a 'gland nut'. Under this nut is a PACKING material. This packing material is compressed by the gland nut to form a seal around the valve stem. Try tightening that gland nut first, only enough to stop the leak... do NOT muscle it down tight tight. ONLY ENOUGH to stop the leak. If this does not work, you can replace the packing. Stop back if tightening doesn't work and someone can walk you through the process if needed.

3. I defer this question to the 'steam heads' on board.
 

Last edited by NJT; 01-05-09 at 07:41 PM.
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Old 01-04-09, 09:30 AM
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It might be a 125 psi relief valve. That looks like a domestic coil.
 
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Old 01-04-09, 10:03 AM
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Good Catch!

Yep, I think yer right OG! Thanks for catching that!

I did think it a somewhat odd location for a boiler relief valve.
 
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Old 01-04-09, 11:27 AM
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125 psi domestic

yes it is a 125 psi domestic relief valve to control the presion that is comming from the stree to the boiler. but let me go back to how to replace it, you said I have to drain the boiler, well in the back of the boiler there is a valve that I believe drain the boiler and the wet return pipe. Do I have to do that because I believe it is a lot of water and I don't have a floor drain, could you tell me how can I avoid that.
Thank
 
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Old 01-04-09, 05:19 PM
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I'm sorry ... when I realized I goofed on the valve, I should have said that you don't have to drain the boiler... that relief valve is not part of the boiler water system...

I'll look later and see if what I need to see is in your picture, but basically you need to turn off the water supply to the water heating coil in the boiler... it's probably that black valve that's leaking ... there may be other valves that you can close so that you don't get that much water leakage... but I have to git outta here for now...
 
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Old 01-05-09, 07:48 PM
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Lata, you need to close the valve above that is leaking.

Is there another valve on the 'other' pipe next to it that can not be seen in the pictures? This 'other' pipe is the hot water supply to your home. Close that valve if you can find one. If there is not another valve, you will have to drain the hot water pipes. You can use a bucket to catch the water from the drain valve above the pressure relief valve. When those domestic hot water pipes are drained, you can remove and replace the pressure relief valve.
 
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Old 01-08-09, 10:27 AM
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I have the same steam boiler in my house (Peerless JOT-TW).

If you just need to drop the operating water level a little bit, then you can drain water from the low water cut off (LWCO), but that drains water near the top of the normal water level and will not be effective in really getting the gunk out of the bottom of the boiler.

You're supposed to drain some water (a gallon or two) every week from the LWCO. This prevents the float from gunking up with sediment, which will cause it to stop functioning.


If you're trying to get your boiler water "clean", then you'll have to drain from the bottom. No matter how much I drained from the LWCO, my water was always dirty until I bit the bullet and drained/flushed from valve at the rear/bottom of the boiler. If that drain valve at the rear hasn't been opened in years, be prepared for the seat to have disintegrated. It may not seal after you crack it open. (I learned this the hard way). Be prepared to completely drain the boiler and have a replacement valve handy if you mess with it.
 
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Old 01-08-09, 03:47 PM
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Just so we're all clear... the relief valve that lata needs to replace is installed in the domestic coil on that boiler, so no boiler water needs to be drained... only the domestic water system.

The BALL VALVE drains seem to be a much more reliable choice for replacing an old boiler drain.
 
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Old 01-08-09, 04:59 PM
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Drain the boiler

Steve, I believe that I need only to drain the domestic hot water to replace that relief valve, but I really like the idea to drain the whole boiler for the first time after I bought this house 18 months ago, could you tell me how to do it.
 
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Old 01-10-09, 09:19 PM
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Here's what I did - you may not have to go to as much trouble, but I've been in my house for 18 years and never had the boiler completely drained/flushed.

I drained my boiler by opening the 3/4" drain valve at the bottom rear - nothing initially came out due to the build up of sediment. After I cleared the "clog" with a metal rod and got the boiler drained, I removed the 2" plug at the front bottom and also removed as many other plugs (these were all 3/4") as I could. I flushed several times by filling the boiler using a garden hose connected at one of the opened locations and drained from one of the bottom locations. I have a drain in the floor of my (unfinished) basement so this process was relatively easy for me. I don't think that I could do this now that it's cold and the boiler runs frequently.

Like I stated earlier, this is the cleanest the water has ever been.

In case you don't have a manual for the boiler, here's a link to Peeress's website.

Series EC/ECT


Download the IO&M manual for the EC/ECT Boiler. Our JOT/TW series have been replaced by the EC/ECT series, but they are very similar castings with identical dimensions and firing rates.
 
 

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