Kickspace heater wiring


  #1  
Old 01-15-09, 04:45 AM
R
RK2
RK2 is offline
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 46
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Kickspace heater wiring

Simple question for which I couldn't find the answer:

Can the fan in the kickspace be wired into the boiler circuit, and if so, should I wire it before or after the emergency cut-off switch?

Since the kickspace is often a ways away from the boiler I assume people usually wire them into different circuits, but since I in this case can wire everything on one circuit, am I allowed to?

Would you generally wire a switch into the circuit so that you can individually power down the heaters, or is that considered overkill?

Thanks
 
  #2  
Old 01-15-09, 05:02 AM
S
Member
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Long Island
Posts: 695
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
another option instead of doing it thru the electric from the boiler to control it ,you can sense the inlet pipe with a temperature control that will OK the fan to run when it feels the boiler water entering.then install a line stat(on the wall) to break the fan when it satisfies...thus the fan is your controlling temperature control and when the stat isn't calling the fan in....and the boiler is running it will just be a stagnant heating coil
 
  #3  
Old 01-15-09, 06:05 PM
1
Member
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: USA
Posts: 16
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by RK2
Simple question for which I couldn't find the answer:

Can the fan in the kickspace be wired into the boiler circuit, and if so, should I wire it before or after the emergency cut-off switch?

Since the kickspace is often a ways away from the boiler I assume people usually wire them into different circuits, but since I in this case can wire everything on one circuit, am I allowed to?

Would you generally wire a switch into the circuit so that you can individually power down the heaters, or is that considered overkill?

Thanks
Are you referring to a hydronic kickspace heater? The kind that you plumb into a hot-water heating zone and has a fan to force air over the coils?

If so, you simply provide 110 volts power for the device. There will be a thermostatic sensor mounted directly on the incoming side of the hot water coil which, when it senses hot water flowing through the coil causes the fan to come on and when the coil cools (because the zone is no longer active) the fan goes off.

The kickspace heaters we installed in a bathroom also had a small rocker switch which allowed setting the fan to off (regardless of water flowing through the coils), low, or high speed.
 
  #4  
Old 01-16-09, 04:29 AM
R
RK2
RK2 is offline
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 46
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Yes, hydronic - I know it just takes a simple 110 circuit.

The question is whether it's allowable by code to wire it into the boiler circuit. I would prefer to do so,since then I can turn off everything heat-related with one switch, plus I'll be able to run it off a single generator circuit - one less breaker on the transfer panel 'wasted.'

R
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: