Is there a high temp radiant product

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Old 02-21-09, 03:16 PM
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Is there a high temp radiant product

I have a small old kitchen with metal cabinets. There used to be a large 3' by 2' radiator in there but it was in the way being right next to the table. I removed the radiator and put a 6' length of baseboard up becouse that is all the wall space there is. I figured i would try it for the winter and see how cold it got in there. It isn't too bad but it definitely would be nice to have some more heat. Now i am out of wall space and with the metal cabinets i cant easily add a kick heater. So is there a radiant floor product i could add to the zone. The water temp in this zone is supposed to be 180 degrees. The other alternative i have seen used is to put some regular fined tubing under the floor. This would be a real pain in the neck.
 
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Old 02-21-09, 05:31 PM
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If you are just on the edge of comfort high output baseboard may be the answer. The next step up would be a cabinet convector and next after that would be a fan-forced cabinet convector. The cabinet convectors would probably stick out a bit farther from the wall than the baseboard, maybe six or eight inches total and would be two to three feet high. You might be able to slightly recess the cabinet convectors depending on the wall construction.
 
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Old 02-21-09, 09:21 PM
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I'd sure try some high output baseboard first myself...

You would need to go to a supply house to get it, it's 'commercial' grade, but product like the SlantFin Multi-Pak 90 are almost, if not, double the output of the stuff from the big box stores... heavier cabinets... take lots of abuse... cost more sure... but probably not what it might cost in time and effort to get a floor heating system in place.

MultiPak 90
 
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Old 02-22-09, 03:42 AM
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Assuming that you replaced a cast iron radiator with copper fin tube baseboard then it will never balance out properly. Cast iron heats up and cools down more slowly because of the greater thermal mass so the two should never be mixed on the same zone and expect them to give consistent results. Would 6' of cast iron baseboard satisfy the heat loss of the room?
 
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Old 02-24-09, 04:08 PM
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The heatloss calculation came out to around 9,000 BTU/hr. Looking at the Multi/Pak 90 it looks like that may be the way to go. The only reason i was thinking some floor heat is i would like to avoid the same problem i had with the radiator. Not only did it stick too far out into the room but it created a 'hot spot' right by the table. The open wall that the heat is on is an inside wall. The cabinets are around the outside wall. So if you are at the sink it would be cold but by the table it would be too hot. Most of the rest of the loop is baseboard. The only room that isn't now is the bathroom.
 
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