baseboards, what paint to use?


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Old 06-06-09, 01:04 PM
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baseboards, what paint to use?

My new boiler gets up to a max 170 so is there any special kind of paint I need to paint my cast iron baseboard covers? And except for not covering my bleeder openings doesnt seem like any other precautions need to be taken.

 
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Old 06-08-09, 10:48 AM
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A good latex primer and an oil based top coat. It does not need to be high temperature paint.
 
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Old 06-08-09, 11:24 AM
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I'd use both oil base primer and oil base enamel although I wouldn't be overly leary of using a latex enamel provided the metal had a good full coat of oil primer applied first.
 
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Old 06-08-09, 06:17 PM
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The manufacturer of cast iron baseboard says use a latex primer and an oil base topcoat.
See link page 13
http://www.burnham.com/PDF/IO/Baseray.pdf
Quote" PAINTING BASE-RAY and Trim are primed with a
latex (water based) paint and must be top coated with a
high grade oil or solvent based enamel to prevent rusting
of the metals immediately after installation. Primer
coated products should not be allowed to sweat as a
result of high room humidity or cold water in system. "
 
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Old 06-09-09, 03:29 AM
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Interesting
My years of painting tell me that an oil base primer should be used over metal that can rust. I wonder why they prime their product with latex

Since they specify an oil top coat to protect against rust, I suspect they use a latex primer for reasons other than it being the best primer to use. It might be a factory VOC/OSHA thing or maybe it just saves them money.
 
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Old 06-09-09, 06:55 AM
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my head's spinning from the types of primer to choose, but you are all saying i need to use it. I'm glad i asked because I just assumed i'd need to clean off the surface debris then paint right over the existing paint. And if i do decide to do the repainting, it's gonna be once and done for my lifetime so i do wanna do it right.

i did know that on areas of rust id have to do it but thankfully that's pretty much only the bathroom.
 
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Old 06-10-09, 04:24 AM
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If you already have a good base coat I would believe you would only have to rough it up and re-paint with a good oil base paint.
 
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Old 06-10-09, 04:55 AM
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rough up with course sandpaper i assume? I only ask because obviously i dont do much painting and i have visions of big scrape lines all over the place
 
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Old 06-10-09, 05:22 AM
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220 grit would be good, 180 would be ok. Anything coarser will proabably need a primer and/or a 2nd coat of enamel.
 
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Old 06-10-09, 09:17 AM
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ok thanks. And i studied them a bit more and realized the long sections would be ez to do but at the ends, where all the caps etc are, it's like things are really embedded/up against the carpet. Id definitely have to miss painting in those close quarters so as not to paint the carpet. Seems very tedious .

maybe i should clean them up first before starting any paint job Has to be done regardless
 
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Old 06-10-09, 10:00 AM
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OK, no one has brought up the subject of color, or I missed it in the reading. But I don't understand why they call this "radiant baseboard heat" and then paint it white. White is one of the least radiant colors out there. It doesn't have to be black, as any darker color should send radiant heat in all directions, warming the room and the people in it directly without waiting for the convective air flow.

What am I missing?

Bud
 
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Old 06-10-09, 11:19 AM
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i had no idea color mattered but admittedly never thought of doing any other color than white. Having just discovered my hardwood under the carpets may be in decent shape, i may even rip apart the carpet, thus maybe i can match with new paint all around

but I think why people dont discuss color is you dont want it to turn out ugly and no matter if you are a fan or not of white, it's really not as ugly as say, if you pick the wrong color green

for the record, in my kitchen they did paint the baseboard the same green as the wallpaper and i do think it looks pretty good actually. White would really have made it stick out and look bad.

so now you gave me one more thing to think about (bangs head on wall lol).

Plus now i have to think, what order to do things in IF i do rip out the carpet...maybe carpet out, paint baseboards, tarp the floor then do the walls. I cant imagine painting the baseboards while carpet is down. If i decide to keep the carpet, i'm pretty sure no way will i paint the baseboards..or at least anything other than white
 
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Old 06-10-09, 12:59 PM
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It's almost always better to paint the walls prior to painting the base. Painting base over carpet is never fun. I usually press the carpet down and use 2" masking tape. I'll then paint the base but try to keep the paint off of the tape to help prevent paint from seeping under the tape. You can also use a shield to hold the carpet back as you paint but you run the risk of the carpet sticking to the wet paint as you remove/move the shield.

I don't know if the color would make much difference or not but I'm sure most are painted with aesthetics in mind.
 
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Old 06-10-09, 01:16 PM
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well the other thought process is what color i paint today may not be one i want in 10 years and do i wanna paint the baseboards again? Hmmm so much to think about. But IF the carpet comes out, then painting the baseboards is irrelevant and would be a breeze
 
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Old 06-10-09, 02:50 PM
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paint

my experiance with painting rads, especialy steam was to be shure to let the paint dry a day or two before heating or you might get a slight discoloring .
 
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Old 06-10-09, 05:49 PM
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Color is not as big an issue as too how many coats you end up with in 15 years or more. Radiant is a function of the baseboard not the paint color. Cast iron is a radiant type medium. The convection takes place due to the fine on the back and the air space at the top and bottom.
 
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Old 06-19-09, 07:11 AM
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Originally Posted by Bud9051 View Post
OK, no one has brought up the subject of color, or I missed it in the reading. But I don't understand why they call this "radiant baseboard heat" and then paint it white. White is one of the least radiant colors out there. It doesn't have to be black, as any darker color should send radiant heat in all directions, warming the room and the people in it directly without waiting for the convective air flow.

What am I missing?

Bud
the covers are not emitting heat. if you were talking about the iron or copper pipe behind the cover, then, yeah, paint that sucker red.
 
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Old 06-19-09, 08:05 AM
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Originally Posted by sleeper View Post
the covers are not emitting heat. if you were talking about the iron or copper pipe behind the cover, then, yeah, paint that sucker red.
if they arent emitting heat, then why do i burn myself if i accidentally touch one in winter

for the record, i have started ripping carpet out of my one hallway (ie easier to paint baseboards) but since the padding is stuck to the hardwood, unsure how much more im going to rip up until i find a solution to make the floors look good again
 
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Old 07-05-09, 05:54 PM
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Originally Posted by rbeck View Post
Color is not as big an issue as too how many coats you end up with in 15 years or more. Radiant is a function of the baseboard not the paint color. Cast iron is a radiant type medium. The convection takes place due to the fine on the back and the air space at the top and bottom.
I just reread your post and now i'm wondering if my baseboards are ok? They installed 'capping' (i dont know what else to call it) at the top of most of the baseboards and in your post you said there's space at the top and bottom. However except for that horizontal slot you see in post one, in rooms with deeper carpeting there is no opening at the bottom of the baseboards and as i said, there's no opening at top because of the wooden cap. In rooms with hardwood or non plush carpets, there is space at the bottom of the baseboard.

so am i missing out on heat since only that slot is letting heat out? Though of course the baseboards themselves get so hot.

---------------------------------

and i'm still contemplating whether or not to match colors or contrast them. In one room i will be having a denim blue on the walls and i can either do bright white and show off the baseboard or just paint them the same color. I know it's style preference but it's not an ez choice.
 
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Old 07-05-09, 06:13 PM
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Hi LD, although I try to squeeze out any extra radiant heat when possible (debatable), the primary flow of heat from a baseboard unit is convection, an unobstructed flow of air into, up, and out of each. If either the input or output is blocked, you are seriously limiting the heat capacity.

Bud
 
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Old 07-05-09, 07:11 PM
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Lucky, would you please post a picture or two of these "capped" baseboards? If they are indeed regular baseboard convectors that have been seriously modified to eliminate the air flow that may be a BIG reason why you have trouble getting your house up to temperature in a reasonable time frame.
 
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Old 07-06-09, 02:38 PM
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living room closed on top



kitchen closed on top



hall closed on top


bathroom not closed (towels above it dry nicely in winter)

 
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Old 07-06-09, 04:50 PM
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Maybe I'm missing something but the only difference I see is that what you call closed on top seems to have a quarter-round or other molding on the top of the casing next to the wall. The openings in the upper portion front of the units should allow for air leaving the unit. It also looks like there is certainly a gap between the floor and the bottom of the front cover to allow air entrance.

Of course I can't see the size of the bottom gap all that well from the camera angle. Does that carpet edge tend to close that lower gap to a greater degree? Are you able to get a picture from the floor level? Do you know how to remove the front covers in order to vacuum the finned tube elements?
 
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Old 07-06-09, 06:12 PM
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Furd you are exactly right. The top should be capped with quarter round wood. Helps control air flow. Proper installation also calls for reflective material behind the baseboard but most people do not use it.
Here is most of the information you should need.
http://www.burnham.com/PDF/IO/Baseray.pdf
See top drawing on page 9
 
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Old 07-06-09, 06:35 PM
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Ok sounds like 1/2 the house is correctly capped so should i cap the other places in the house that arent capped but have airspace on top (for example in the bathroom pic above)? And for those not capped what is the effect on the room? not as hot? Had i not been informed otherwise, i would have thought letting hot air out the top was the way to go but this has been an informative thread indeed.

I did notice in my bedroom (not pictured here) that the baseboard is up against the wall flush and there's neither a space nor any wood on top of the baseboard..weird. I think work was done on those walls way after installation but per this thread i have no worries at least.

hall carpet (I removed some of this carpet - hall hardwood pic above- but the rest remains for now)



living room carpet (likely keeping the carpet there even after repainting etc)

 
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Old 07-20-09, 11:00 AM
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update:

within about 3 weekends ill probably have my gf paint the baseboards (she's a master cutter inner lol)

I noticed in one corner of my living room the wood on top has separated and in some cases pretty largely. I know the best thing to do is try to fix it but honestly i'm worried if i hammer it back it will just come back out again. So i was thinking of just spackling and sanding down to match and just painting it the same color as the baseboard

just curious if you think the spackle will be affected by the heat?

and she will have a chore on her hands because i decided to keep the living room carpet (pic immediately above this posting) and i tried sliding paper under there and it wouldnt even go lol
 
 

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