Riello F5 Motor Replacement


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Old 08-27-09, 10:52 AM
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Riello F5 Motor Replacement

I have a Riello F5 burner firing a Buderus boiler that has been in continuous operation for over 8 years. It's heating a big old drafty farm house and we also heat domestic water as a zone off the boiler so the burner has well over average hours for its age I think. It has never had anything replaced other than nozzles during annual cleanings/tuning.

Last winter I started hearing, intermittently, what sounds like bearing noise from the burner (a whining noise that does not seem to be caused by an obstruction), but the burner still seems to be operating OK. After reading posts here and elsewhere I am fairly convinced it is motor bearings. I have acquired a replacement motor, and before I dive in to replace it I am looking for some advice:

1) Should I wait for complete failure of the existing motor before replacing it with the new one? And if so, what is the typical failure mode? Will waiting for failure cause damage to other parts of the burner? My gut feel is that I probably should replace it before the cold weather sets in this fall.

2) Should I, or must I, replace other components while I have the burner apart for the motor replacement?

4) How difficult is it to actually replace it? I am fairly mechanically inclined and a DIYer in general, so it doesn't scare me, but are there any potential pitfalls I should be aware of?

5) Does Riello publish any kind of service documentation that might help me? Their website seems to be mostly marketing fluff, so if anyone knows where I might find a service guide for the F5 that would be appreciated.

Thanks in advance.
 
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Old 08-27-09, 04:05 PM
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Paging Grady!

Our resident Riello expert who is 'napping'...

hopefully he will see your message and respond.

Meanwhile, check your PMs...
 
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Old 08-27-09, 08:57 PM
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I've never seen a Riello but I have read some about them. If I remember correctly they have special taps on the motor winding that they use for control power functions. If I am correct then it isn't so simple as using another similar rated (horsepower, speed, rotation) oil burner motor but it is necessary to have an exact Riello replacement.
 
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Old 08-28-09, 07:16 PM
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Riello Motor

Yep, ol' Grady was napping, least 'til somebody woke him up.

The first Riello motor you replace can be an adventure. It's not difficult but a lot different than other burner motors. I'll do my best to talk you thru the task:

Turn off the power to the boiler.

Remove the knurled nut holding the fuel solenoid coil, inverted 'U' bracket, & coil.

Disconnect the nozzle tube from the pump.

If there is a few inches of play, you won't have to disconnect the fuel line(s) to remove the pump, otherwise, disconnect the fuel line(s) from the pump.

The pump is held in place by a (2?) phillips screw(s) thru the end of the motor housing.

You can now remove the pump. Be careful not to loose the plastic drive key which goes over the end of the pump shaft.

If there is no electric air shutter, remove the burner fan cover by removing the 3 phillips screws around the perimeter of the cover then remove the cover. (Sometimes tricky)

Remove the allen set screw holding the fan to the shaft & remove the fan. IF IT WON'T COME OFF FAIRLY EASILY, DON'T FORCE IT.

Loosen the Phillips screw on the left side of the burner conrol box.

Gently pry the control box back toward you, lift the back end, & slip the control off. The wiring sub-base is now exposed.

The motor has 4 wires, connected as follows: Black to terminal 3, Blue to terminal 6, White to terminal 7, & Brown to terminal 9. Remove the wires but be sure to re-install the white wires under terminal #'s 3 & 9.

To make motor wire removal & reconnection easier, loosen the screws holding the sub-base to the burner body & slide the sub-base toward you & lift off.

Remove the two allen screws holding the motor to the burner body & remove the motor.

It is important when re-assembling to get the pump retaining screws even so as not to get the pump out of alignment.
 
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Old 08-31-09, 10:40 AM
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Thanks for the tutorial, Grady. This doesn't sound too bad. I'll let you know how it goes. Is it typical for the fan to be difficult to get off the shaft? And if so, what do you do to free it?
 
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Old 08-31-09, 02:29 PM
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Fan Removal

Sometimes the fan can be a bear to get off, usually not.
If it gives you trouble, remove the set screw completely, set the hole at 12:00 & give it a healthy dose of good penetrating oil such as PB Blaster.
Start the burner motor screws back into their hole & use a metal rod or punch & hammer on the end of the shaft but don't get carried away because the fan housing is cast aluminum. Once the fan moves it should come off.
They make pullers specificly for the job but I've never had to use one.
 
 

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