Gurgling Baseboard-What could it be?


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Old 10-19-09, 04:04 PM
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Gurgling Baseboard-What could it be?

Thanks for any help you all can provide.

Last season my upper baseboard zone was gurgling and was circulating some heat, but seemed inefficient at best.

This year the upper zone flat out will not circulate any hot water. When I went to bleed any air from a screw in the baseboard, I could remove the screw completely and NO water or air was coming out. What the heck?

I used a bicycle pump and put a couple of pumps into the expansion tank. It seems to be holding.

The circulator pump is a B&G inline, similar to this one Bell & Gossett SERIES 100 Inline Circulator Pump

But is likely 25 years old. Could it be bad? I separated the pump and housing and the impeller appears in tact but could it be turning but not pumping?

My boiler assembly is an oil burner and the Altitude reads 25-30 but the pressure barely reaches 6 psi.

I tried adjusting the pressure but it seems to have no effect on the gage.

I really want to do this myself but don't want to shotgun parts.

I am suspecting the pump is NG even though it turns. But even possibly a bad pressure regulator adjuster thing, whatever you call that thing with the screw and the jam nut.

By the way, which way increases the pressure, screw in or screw out?

What should I do next??

Ben
 
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Old 10-19-09, 07:44 PM
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Ben, you gotta slow down! yer doin' stuff you don't need to do. The pump is probably just fine!

You need a certain pressure in your system in order to raise water up to the second floor. If you have no water coming out the bleeders up top, you simply don't have enough pressure in your system. There has to be a minimum of 0.43 PSI PER FOOT, PLUS 4 PSI. If it's say 20 feet from the boiler to the top of the heating system, that works out to around 13 PSI. If you don't have at least that much pressure, no water will make it to the top.

Before you add pressure to the system, get a tire gauge... and measure the pressure in the expansion tank. You need 12-15 PSI of air charge in that tank, BEFORE you add pressure to the system. If it's not there, get the bicycle pump out and add more until it is. OK, next...

Before you go adjusting the 'PRESSURE REDUCING VALVE' (the regulator thingy) take a look and see if there are any manual shut-off valves in the water line leading to the boiler. Are they open?

Does your PRESSURE REDUCING VALVE have a handle, or a lever on it?

It's best if you take some pictures, that way we can tell you what to turn, and when...

If the manual shut-off valves are open, and you still have no pressure in your system, you probably have a plugged up PRV (pressure reducing valve)...

set up a free account at Image hosting, free photo sharing & video sharing at Photobucket and upload the pics there, and drop a LINK to the album here so that we can view your pics.
 
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Old 10-19-09, 08:12 PM
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Ok, Slowing down a bit. I'll start with, You are the Best!

Heres what I found out. I went to Home depot to price some things and...The guy thought it sounded like my regulator as well and tried to sell me a single unit regulator relief valve but I currently have duel (one with screw thingy and other with handle) or separate units installed and he had none of those. I don't want to start changing pipes too.

He recommended applying a pressure from a garden hose to see if the gage worked and whether it made a difference in the system operation.

So I set the expansion tank pressure first then applied pressure to the system.

With the system Hot, I now have approx 18psi and a whole lot of heat upstairs. I will replace that regulator relieve valve duel setup asap. Will it last for a couple of days until I get the parts?
 
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Old 10-19-09, 08:45 PM
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Yes, probably... just keep an eye on the pressure.

It sounds to me though as if you have the old style regulator, with a companion RELIEF valve, and the reason he didn't have any of those is because they aren't used anymore.

Your pressure relief valve should be ASME rated, and I don't think the one you have actually is... at least that's what it sounds like from your description.

You might wanna think this out a bit before you do anything.

I can help ya think if you would post some pictures so I can see what ya have... take pics of everything around the boiler, and one or two from a distance back so we can see how it all fits together... set up a free account at Image hosting, free photo sharing & video sharing at Photobucket and upload the pics there... come back here and drop a LINK to your album for us to view.

If you don't have a proper relief valve, now would be the time to add one. A PROPER relief valve would look like this:


photo courtesy high-performance-hvac.com
 
 

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