Why is Honeywell V8043 1036 valve very warm to the touch?


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Old 01-01-10, 06:42 PM
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Why is Honeywell V8043 1036 valve very warm to the touch?

The one for the downstairs of our house is very warm to the touch and the heat doesn't turn on via the thermostat controls. The upstairs valve is cool to the touch and responds promptly. Can I replace the valve without draining our pipes? Valve being the motor/gears alone or is it best to call a plumber to do it?
 
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Old 01-01-10, 06:56 PM
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Yes, the whole powerhead can be changed very easily, or just the motor. If you clip and strip the existing wires, you won't have to do any soldering... just use a couple small wire nuts. As long as it's just the motor that's bad...

Patriot Supply - 802360JA - motor only

V8043E head only, with wires

V8043F head only, with terminal block

BUT... it could be warm because the thermostat is calling for heat constantly, and the motor has been powered for a long time, and the valve has actually opened, and it's the ENDSWITCH that is bad...

So, turn the thermostat for that zone all the way down, and see if the valve closes... you should be able to hear it...then turn it up and listen for it opening. Also, if the valve is OPEN, the MANUAL lever will move very freely, if it's closed, you will feel (and hear) the gears move when you operate it.
 

Last edited by NJT; 01-01-10 at 07:21 PM.
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Old 01-01-10, 07:07 PM
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The lever at the top mover VERY freely. If the valve is open can we still just replace the motor/gears without drenching ourselves? Is the endswitch part of the motor/gears? Never had to replace one before so I'm sorry my questions are quite basic.
 
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Old 01-01-10, 07:14 PM
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Ok, just turned the thermostat all the way down and the little lever on the valve moved a very small amount. Then turned the heat back up and it moved again.

Earlier the sylenoid was very warm but the pipe above and below was not.

I turned the heat on upstairs which works just fine. Then turned the heat up downstairs and it seems to be working now. Could the two valves somehow be tied together? There are wires going from one to another?
 
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Old 01-01-10, 07:31 PM
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Basic questions good! No problema...

A little primer:

The thermostat controls the motor in the zone valve. When the valve opens, it trips the endswitch inside the head assembly that sends a signal to the boiler. In other words, the thermostat doesn't 'talk' to the boiler directly, it relies on the zone valve to 'pass it on'.

There IS wiring between the two valves because the Endswitches are wired in parallel. EITHER one (or both) can tell the boiler to fire.

Let's back up a bit...

Turn BOTH thermostats all the way down.

Now, turn ONE all the way up and watch/listen for the valve to open, and the boiler to fire. If OK, then turn that thermostat all the way down again.

Go to the next one and do the same thing. Valve should open and boiler should fire up.

If you turn BOTH thermostats up, and BOTH valves are opening, but only ONE endswitch is working, you will get heat in both zones, because the boiler still gets a signal to fire.

No, you won't get wet. You can change the power head without having to drain anything. Very easy...

The motor can be changed without removing the powerhead, but I think you have a problem with one of the endswitches, and we'll know if you repeat the tests...
 
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Old 01-01-10, 08:26 PM
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This paper from Honeywell shows how to change the powerhead. It shows how to fit a 5000 head on a 1000 body, but the only difference is that the 5000 series valves have a 'pushbutton', and don't use the 2 screws. So, just ignore the part about the pushbutton, and this will apply to the 1000 series valves just fine.

http://customer.honeywell.com/techli...0s/67-7184.pdf
 
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Old 01-01-10, 08:45 PM
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I should go backwards and ask a question ...

How old are your zone valves?

If they are REAL old, and have FOUR screws holding the powerhead on, you can't change those without draining the system... AND you will need a conversion kit to use the new powerhead.

Conversion kit

if there are only TWO screws holding the powerhead, yer OK.
 

Last edited by NJT; 01-01-10 at 09:05 PM.
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Old 02-04-10, 12:56 PM
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Bad end switch

Amazingly I had this same problem come up today. The zone in question only got heat when other zones were getting hot water. The problem zone motor was very hot to touch. When the other zones quit heating and the circulation pump stopped, my problem zone stopped heating. BUT the zone thermostat was still calling for heat and the zone motor still had the valve open. I found the bad end switch by using a screw driver to push in on the end switch buttons alternately and ONLY my bad zone failed to turn on the circulation pump.

NOW>>> can I find a replacement switch or do I have to replace the complete head? I can solder stuff so that wouldn't be a problem.
 
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Old 02-04-10, 02:00 PM
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end switch

I don't think honeywell sells switches, but I've found switches that are identical at all-electronics and Mouser electronics. I'm not sure whether this would be an "approved" repair as far as your insurance co is concerned, but I've done it and it's worked fine. Just be sure the switch you get is electrically rated for the load. I'm pretty sure the switches I used were 120v 5 amp rating. Good luck- Steve
 
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Old 02-04-10, 02:53 PM
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Steve, would you happen to still have the part number info handy from when you bought yours?

Bob, 'Microswitch' is the main brand name... I believe it's a Honeywell company.
 
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Old 02-04-10, 04:07 PM
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end switch

The ones I bought were from allelectronics.com part# SMS-243
Just solder the wires on and they work like a champ! I found a similar switch at Mouser, I think, but if I remember right they were more expensive. Hope it helps-
Steve
 
 

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