loud starting oil burner

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  #1  
Old 01-17-10, 11:55 AM
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loud starting oil burner

I have a Superior oil burner with a Carlin EZ1 burner. After adjusting my boiler/burner after the mess the oil company left it in I have a nice even burn and the rumble is gone. The only thing left is that the burner has a loud rumble start when it sits for a long period of time. During normal the heating cycle it seems fine. When the heat is satisfied and the burner is off for a long period of time when it starts it is loud. I wouldn't really call it a pop but a loud rumble. What am I missing? Oil pump leaking maybe?
 
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Old 01-17-10, 04:08 PM
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One or two pipe fuel system?
What is the OF draft, ignore the draft in the vent pipe...it is not important unless the boiler is designed for positive pressure.

Were the electrodes set to spec?
What is the CO2?
 
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Old 01-17-10, 06:15 PM
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What causes the rumbling is unburned oil. Either a bad cutoff on the fuel pump or a delayed ignition. The oil and spark must meet at the same time or you will have rumbling or puffback or a loud noise when ignition takes place. If you have a delay because of an oil problem there will be no noise or smell or smoke, just a late fire if any at all. If it only does it when its off for a while could possibly be the pump but I would start by checking the electrode settings first. Another note, if your nozzle is worn that would also give you the same thing because of the oil shooting all over the place but woi8ld most likely do it every time. If is the pump you can add a solonoid valve to solve your problem.
 
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Old 01-18-10, 12:12 AM
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Is fuel tank above or below burner?
If below, 2 pipe or single there should be a check valve on
supply line before fuel filter, it may be mucked or worn out.
Also check all fittings for tightness, cracked flare nuts, faulty
or leaking flares. Check fuel filter- correct flow, element and
gaskets in good shape, hardware tight.
All fuel pumps that are lifting fuel should be two piped, and be
two stage. (Suntec B2VA-8216)
Electrode gap and position relative to nozzle tip is a good
place to start. Remember- forward position changes according
to spray angle.
Ignition transformer/ignitor- should be able to draw 3/8-1/2"
spark with philips screwdriver. Caution- High Voltage!
Make sure you have the correct nozzle (GPH,spray angle,type)
for your application.
I think you have a little air entering the fuel supply, but all the
"stupid" stuff needs to be checked.
 
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Old 01-18-10, 08:52 AM
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I knew after I posted this that I left out all the information you would need to answer me. So let me do my best now.

I should mention that I have a Tjernlund Power Venter and not a chimney. I did clean out the prover tube on this last night though and it may have helped some, can't be sure though. Placebo effect maybe.

Burner below tank
Single line system
Electrodes set via Carlin gauge
Draft (from memory was -.04 or -.05)

Meant to grab the CO2 numbers this morning but having to dig out after the snow I forgot.

I was busy when the oil company cleaned my burner this year so I didn't watch and I ended up having a real noise problem when they put in a .65 70A nozzle when they took out a .60 70A. Had them come back and put in the .60. Took them 3 trips before I had to order and supply the nozzle as they claimed they can't get one. After all this the never used any test equipment that I know of. I won't call them back to adjust it as I don't trust them any more.

I have a Dwyer 460 and a True spot on order (can you recommend a thermometer?)

One other thing. In the refractory (chamber) there is a round piece of what I could best describe is ceiling tile type material. Not metal, not rock hard, but obviously fireproof. The flame seems to bounce off of this. It is not attached to anything though and just lays against the back wall. Would it make sense that this is supposed be floating?

The biggest problem is that no one knows who or what a Superior SO-75 boiler is and I have no specs on it. So after dealing with this for 12 years time for me to check on my burner guys I guess.

Prior to next years heating season I think I need to hire an independent to come in and do a 1000% check up on this unit and have them spend some quality time with it.
 
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Old 01-18-10, 03:44 PM
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That material yo are referring to is your firebox or target wall as they are called now. It contains the fire and lessens the noise. The fire should never touch any part of it. Any time the fire hits it you are not getting a complete burn. Anything that hits the wall is unburned oil and would give you rumbling or oil smell on lightoff.
 
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Old 01-18-10, 06:07 PM
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Well, since that is just sitting there attached to nothing I guess I need to take a close look at it. May be most of my problem then.
 
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Old 01-18-10, 08:48 PM
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Please be aware that the material you are looking at is a probable carcinogen... do NOT breathe the dust!
 
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Old 08-16-10, 07:08 AM
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Well since heating season is fast approaching I thought I would do some due diligence and see if I can get this puppy running smoothly. I opened up the chamber to get at the target wall and see about putting it where it belongs and found about 3 inches of crap on the bottom floor. I vacuumed up the ash and crud and what appears to be some sort of cement?



Now I have a pretty clean looking chamber



but I am concerned about the cement floor? Any input on this??

Also, I still have the target wall that I need to get mounted back up. It looks like it was stuck on 3 studs at one point but I am sure it will not just sit there without using some sort of adhesive to keep it stuck.



Overall from what I can see the boiler itself seems to be in decent shape except for these two things.

So what do you guys think? Can I keep this thing alive?

Thanks,
Bill
 
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