Gushing water in pipes


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Old 01-28-10, 08:16 AM
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Gushing water in pipes

I have spent the last 4 days reading these forums trying to find the proper solution to my problem. I am hoping someone can help!

I have rushing water sounds in my heating system. Most notably in the 2nd floor zone. I know this means I have air in the system, I have tried to purge it from the system at the burner (closed system) to no avail. I am sure I am doing it wrong, in fact I think I might have gotten more air in the system. Can some one please detail the proper procedure for getting the air out. I have 3 zones, 1 of which feeds a hot water heater. I have connected a hose to the 2nd floor zone, closed the shut off valve which is about the circulator (leaving the other two open) the turned the spicket open to let the water (and air) flow out. I have done this with the burner running and not running with no resolution. I did let the pressure go down to about 5psi assuming the auto fill would keep up, but when I realized it would not I opened the fast fill to bring the pressure back up to about 15psi. Still the more I purge the louder and longer the rushing water continues when the heat runs.

Please someone guide me in the right direction here. I would love to go to sleep tonight without the rushing water sounds.

Thanks in advance!

Dan
 
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Old 01-28-10, 08:41 AM
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Isolate the zones. If you can shut off the zones you are not working on. Turn the system off. Bring the boiler pressure up to about 28psi. You don't want the relief valve to blow off. Shut off the valve blow the purge valve and bleed the zone until you remove the air. Repeat process if necessary until all air is out. When bleeding the system don't let the pressure go down below 15psi. If your pressure goes below where the feeder comes back on you're defeating the purpose. Whenever fresh water is introduced it also brings air and that's where your problem comes in. When bleeding you do not want any fresh water coming in to system.When done if pressure is still high bring down to about 15psi. Open all valves and run boiler.
 
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Old 01-28-10, 08:51 AM
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well correct me if I am wrong, the only way to keep the pressure up is to use the fast fill lever, which would be adding fresh water to the system and from what you said defeat the purpose. Is there another way to increase pressure?
 
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Old 01-28-10, 09:22 AM
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When you start your process you want to use your fastfill to 28 then bleed your zone. If the bleeding is not done by the time you reach 15 stop your bleeding and refill to 28. When all the air is out check your pressure. If it is high drain down to 15 and run boiler.
 
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Old 01-28-10, 09:45 AM
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okay, let me recap the process I will take this evening when I get home.

1. turn down all thermostats to shut off zones.
2. turn off burner via emergency on/off switch
3. hook hose up to the zone I want to purge
4. fast fill until pressure reads about 28 psi (do I leave fast fill running or shut it off when I hit the target pressure?)
5. close valve above circulator for the particular zone
6. open purge valve and let water and AIR (i pray) flow out hose.
7. when pressure gets down to 15 psi. close purge valve and repeat if needed.

Should I close the other 2 valves above the other 2 circulators? Should I do all the zones? Anything I am missing?

Thank you so much for your help!
 
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Old 01-28-10, 10:56 AM
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1) shut off switch on boiler.
2) shut off fast fill when 28 is reached.
3) shut off the other valves above circs.
If the other zones are heating it's up to you. As long as they are isolated you shouldn't have to, only you can tell.
If you shut the boiler switch off you will not have to shut off the t-stats unless you just want to try that zone by itself when done.
 
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Old 01-28-10, 11:01 AM
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okay great I will give it a whirl tonight.. I will report back my results. One last question though. Should I wait for the system to cool down before doing this, or can I just shut it down and do it hot?
 
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Old 01-28-10, 04:18 PM
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Assuming that you get the air bled, and assuming that was the problem, need to address a couple of issues.

How did air get into the system? Did you drain or open it for maintenance?

Why didn't the air removal devices do their job?
 
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Old 01-29-10, 08:06 AM
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If you can give it a chance to cool down a little that would be fine.
 
 

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