Smell in room over boiler?


  #1  
Old 04-22-10, 08:05 PM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: United States
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Smell in room over boiler?

Hello,

I have a oil fired New Yorker boiler that does our hot water and baseboard radiators.

Since about February, we have been noticing a smell in the room over the boiler. I think it can best be described as a burning metallic smell. It does not present itself every time the boiler fires, but I seem to smell it more often now than I used to. Walking through the room disturbs it enough that you lose track of the scent. The smell is not centered in the room over the boiler; we seem to smell it right in the doorway, but more and more I think it may actually be coming from over the boiler and the air just settles in the corner by the door because of the way the room is shaped. I am not 100% sure but I think the smell actually comes up after the boiler shuts down.

I do not smell it anywhere near the boiler downstairs.

The fuel oil company has been out three times in the past six weeks to look at the problem and adjust the heater. A chimney company was brought out, identified cracks in the chimney liner, and the chimney was relined. The problem persists. After the latest adjustment from the fuel oil company, after the new liner, the smell went away for three days but came back. CO reading after the last adjustment was 1ppm.

There are attic hatches in the same room. I have sealed those, no difference.

Any advice? Half the people I talk to say, well, heaters smell, and the other half are like me and think there's a problem.

Thanks
Paul
 
  #2  
Old 04-23-10, 04:52 AM
rbeck's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 2,501
Received 9 Votes on 7 Posts
Heaters can't smell they have no noses.
1 PPM CO.....hmmmm. What were the rest of the combustion results like CO2, draft, smoke?
How big is the boiler room approximately? What is the model number of the boiler?
You really should not be getting odors from any heating appliance inside the home.
In the vent pipe there is a draft regulator which has a little flapper door. Is there a yellow staining around the door on the ring?
 
  #3  
Old 04-23-10, 05:04 AM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: United States
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Model is S176AP.

co2 max 15.7
455.5 T Stack
10.83 C02
84.3 EFF
42.0 Ex Air
6.5 Oxygen

No staining around the damper.

The room is small, 6x6 maybe? Louvered door on one side that opens into a laundry room, opening to a ventilated crawlspace on the other.
 
  #4  
Old 04-23-10, 02:58 PM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 23,539
Received 4 Votes on 3 Posts
co2 max 15.7
This is written on the test result? What do they mean by that? is there any 'context' around this?

455.5 T Stack
Does it say NET or GROSS near this reading?
 
  #5  
Old 04-23-10, 05:42 PM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: United States
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
This is written on the test result? What do they mean by that? is there any 'context' around this?
Yes, it's a printout from their computer, 15.7%. That was off on its own along with the fuel type. The rest of the numbers are in a section labeled "Flue gas".

Does it say NET or GROSS near this reading?
Nope, just degrees F.
 
  #6  
Old 04-23-10, 06:55 PM
rbeck's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 2,501
Received 9 Votes on 7 Posts
CO2 is a bit low and excess air is high. No draft reading? Sounds like a confined space area. It could be starting a bit hard and puffing out some odors on start-up and it takes awhile to work it's way upstairs.
If it is confined space you can get down drafts spilling odors after shutdown.
 
  #7  
Old 04-23-10, 07:05 PM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: United States
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
What sort of action could be taken to correct that?
 
  #8  
Old 04-24-10, 08:59 AM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 23,539
Received 4 Votes on 3 Posts
Sounds like the analyzer recorded the peak CO2 value as the system was starting up, before reaching 'steady state'.

450 stack at 10.8 CO2 gives efficiency of a little over 81%...
so that must be the GROSS temp (absolute stack temp before subtracting the combustion air inlet temp)...

To get to 84.3% at 10.8 CO2, the NET stack would have to be around 350 ... which means that the air temp in the room would have to be around 100 ... and that's crazy hot ... I doubt if the boiler room is that hot!

What sort of action could be taken to correct that?
Ensure that there is a proper amount of combustion air.
 
  #9  
Old 04-24-10, 09:25 AM
F
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,495
Received 36 Votes on 28 Posts
455.5 T Stack tells me it is TOTAL stack temperature or stack temperature plus ambient temperature, what Trooper calls Gross stack temperature.
 
  #10  
Old 04-24-10, 11:24 AM
M
Member
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: U.S. Midwest
Posts: 1,340
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by furd View Post
455.5 T Stack tells me it is TOTAL stack temperature or stack temperature plus ambient temperature, what Trooper calls Gross stack temperature.
I understand what everybody means, but the words are getting mixed up.

Net flue gas temp is the actual flue gas temp, minus the temp of the combustion air. "Flue gas temp plus ambient temp" - I don't think that comes into play for combustion analysis.

"Gross" stack temp would be just plain-old stack temp, as measured with a temperature probe stuck into the boiler flue (ahead of any barometric damper or draft hood, for example).
 
  #11  
Old 04-24-10, 01:15 PM
F
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,495
Received 36 Votes on 28 Posts
I'm sorry, I could have been more direct with my answer.

Gross stack temperature, total stack temperature and just plain stack temperature all mean the same thing, the reading from the thermometer that is just stuck in the stack without taking into account the room temperature or the combustion air temperature if it is directly ducted from outside.

Net stack temperature is the temperature measured at the stack and then having the combustion air temperature subtracted. Example: the thermometer in the stack reads 400 degrees and the temperature of the air entering the burner is 65 degrees the net stack temperature is then 400-65 or 335 degrees.
 
  #12  
Old 05-01-10, 10:05 AM
O
Member
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: A Galaxy From Afar
Posts: 421
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Max CO2 reading

Originally Posted by paul9123 View Post
Yes, it's a printout from their computer, 15.7%. That was off on its own along with the fuel type.
This is the maximum possible CO2% with fuel oil. Same as 0% excess air.

If the analyzer was set up for a natural gas fired boiler the value would be about 12%. Propane is about 13.8%.

Just an informational message for the tech.

Al.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: