Just installed Beckett AFG on Weil-McLain WTGO-3; should I increase pump pressur


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Old 09-23-10, 08:51 AM
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Just installed Beckett AFG on Weil-McLain WTGO-3; should I increase pump pressur

Hi forum members,

Have a Weil-McLain WTGO-3 Oil Boiler with DHW.
Just installed a Brand New Beckett AFG that was set up for the WTGO-2 but has the correct tube etc but:

Pump pressure was preset for 100 PSI and nozzle is Delavan .75 70 B.

Should I increase pump pressure to 140 PSI and change to the Delavan .85 45 B as recommended in the manual?

Will the increased pump pressure and new nozzle be more efficient?

Thanks in Advance!,
Paul
 
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Old 09-23-10, 03:29 PM
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I would say yes, do what Beckett recommends for their burner in your boiler.

Remember that what the goal is to achieve the correct firing rate for your system, a .85 nozzle at 140 PSI is somewhere around 1.2 GPH ? (approximately) firing rate.

I would double check that 45 spray pattern though! Seems awful wide to me... but I don't have the books to check the recommendations.
 
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Old 09-23-10, 03:31 PM
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Oh... 'more efficient' ? ummmm, not really. What the higher pressure and smaller nozzle will do is provide a finer droplet size of fuel, which should give better combustion, but won't really add any 'efficiency' to the system. If it does, it's an insignificant amount.
 
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Old 09-23-10, 09:52 PM
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Thanks NJ Trooper,

Double-checked the manual and a Delavan .85 45 B is the recommended nozzle.

Any suggestions for a good place to buy a pressure gauge; need a 0-200 psi with 1/8" MNPT?...Also appears I may need an extension?

Thanks!
 
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Old 09-24-10, 08:31 AM
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Patriot supply.com or id harvey, or any shop that sells air, water, orAC supplies.
Sid
 
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Old 09-24-10, 08:12 PM
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Has your new burner got the CleanCut pump installed? If so, you can install the gauge on the bleeder port and you may possibly get by without an extension... I use a plain old 1/8" brass pipe nipple with a coupler on the end, and a regular old 0-200 gauge.

If you are running the CleanCut pump, be aware that the pressure you read before the oil valve opens is not the pump pressure, so don't be concerned that it's low, probably around 60-75 PSI or so. It will jump up when the valve opens. I'm not 100% certain of this, haven't been able to confirm it yet, but I believe the pressure you see before the valve opens is the 'cut-off pressure'.

One other thing... don't be tempted to leave a gauge permanently installed unless you are using a quality glycerin filled gauge. The pulsations will cause a cheapo gauge to self destruct in a year or two, and it _will_ leak! Personally, I wouldn't even trust a quality gauge permanently installed.

A swimming pool supply house might have gauges also, as well as a regular plumbing supply.
 
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Old 09-25-10, 05:40 AM
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Thanks NJ Trooper,

Don't have the CleanCut; have a Suntec B2VA-8216.

Appears that copper fuel line is in the way of the gauge port; can I take that off and plug the Solenoid end when I adjust the pump pressure?

Thanks also for advice about leaving gauge in place; thought about doing that so now I know better.

Paul
 
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Old 09-25-10, 07:08 AM
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If you have to take the nozzle line off anyway, you can simply adapt the gauge to that. You don't have to use the gauge port. Wonder why they would install the nozzle line blocking the gauge port?

If you put a small valve in the line to the gauge, you could permanently install...
 
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Old 09-29-10, 05:43 PM
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Whos going to set up this burner so it don't soot up your house or blow the smoke pipe off your boiler and catch fire?
 
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Old 09-29-10, 09:01 PM
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Speaking from experience Al?
 
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Old 10-03-10, 02:53 PM
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I see that kind of thing all the time. A heating system isnt like a washing machine it can kill you.
 
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Old 10-03-10, 07:24 PM
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I'm sure you do... I like to think that most people have common sense at least. But of course there are those who don't, and have no business undertaking a project like this.

Sad fact is that almost every so-called 'pro' that I've ever dealt with is not, in my opinion. Take a survey of the burner techs around here in NJ sometime... ask them if they've even got a smoke tester in the truck, let alone a combustion analyzer... things might be different where you are?

So Paul, after you are finished setting the burner up, call around and see if you can find a pro to come out with his combustion analyzer and check your adjustments... good luck.
 
 

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