System 2000 connected to a water heating wood stove?

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  #41  
Old 12-15-13, 01:50 PM
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Hi,
I do have one issue I have noticed with my heating system. Since the install of the system 2000, I have noticed the radiators in the lowest level no longer get hot. I do not dare touch the valves on each since they are very corroded. The new system most likely has a smaller circulator and may not be pushing the water thru the system fast enough.
One thing I did notice is the circulator now needs to pass water thru a zone valve due to the way the system 2000 works. This zone valve appears to be 3/4 inch and the shutoff valve is also 3/4 inch. The feed and return pipe is 1 1/4 inch with 1/2 inch tees feeding each room. Could the reduction in pipe size slow the water speed down resulting in the lower level radiators not getting hot?

Water flow theory says the water should speed up thru the smaller diameter, then slow back down once the pipe size increases, but this is with constant pressure. I would think the pipe reduction causes the circulator to slow down.

Any thoughts on this?
 
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Old 12-15-13, 04:01 PM
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Hi tom. Its been a long time and I will need to re read the post to get acquainted...

Stand by....

Troop and heat pro are still around...
 
  #43  
Old 12-15-13, 04:29 PM
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It has been a long time! I pop in once in a while on the boiler forum just to see what problems are out there. Yesterday I wrote a very long post for an update on the system and somehow I got logged off. So I wrote the short version.
 
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Old 12-15-13, 04:39 PM
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Troop and heat pro are still around
Yes... still here and good to hear the system seems to be working well... sorry haven't had a chance to hit ya back just yet... wanted to get these other no heat issues outta the way first!
 
  #45  
Old 12-16-13, 03:26 PM
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Interesting experiment...I ran the wood stove circulator at full speed (grundfos alpha), which has a flow rate of 6 GPM. The wood stove piping is 3/4 inch until it ties into the main heating loop on the other side of the system 2000 zone value and shutoff valve. All of the lower level baseboards got hot, which is good news. The bad news is maybe the system 2000 circulator is undersized or the smaller zone valve is playing a part in the lack of heat. I will post the model of the circulator shortly...
 
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Old 12-16-13, 03:30 PM
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Taco model 007-BF5-7J
1/25 hp
 
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Old 12-16-13, 04:51 PM
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Water flow theory says the water should speed up thru the smaller diameter, then slow back down once the pipe size increases, but this is with constant pressure. I would think the pipe reduction causes the circulator to slow down.
Centrifugal pumps won't speed up or slow down with pressure... unless you've got one of those expensive variable speed jobs...

These pumps run on a 'curve'. The less restriction they pump into, the more water they pump. The speed stays the same.

[late edit: I see you DO have one of those expensive pumps...]
 
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Old 12-16-13, 04:52 PM
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Could the reduction in pipe size slow the water speed down resulting in the lower level radiators not getting hot?
I don't think that's the issue.

Can you take some pictures of the entire system so we can visualize what you've got going on there?
 
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Old 12-16-13, 05:41 PM
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  #50  
Old 12-16-13, 06:30 PM
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The expensive pump runs all the time when my wood stove is lit. It circulates water from the wood stove to the large storage tank and back. When the water gets to a set temperature, a three way valve opens, directing the water from the wood stove, to the baseboards, to the storage tank and finally back to the wood stove. When initially heating the house, I set the pump to auto adapt which pumps about 3-4GPM thru the system using about 15 watts. Once the house is at temp, I set the pump to low speed, 2GPM and 7 watts. Usually set to low speed overnight as well. I have an auto transfer switch and solar powered battery charger as my system power backup just in case power goes out. I know both of these pump settings do not move the water fast enough to heat the lower level baseboards, but the system 2000 main pump should be able to heat just like my previous Columbia system (and probably larger circulator) did.

The wood stove pump was selected for efficiency.
 
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Old 12-17-13, 06:19 PM
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Kind of off subject but how are those pressed fittings working out? I've used them on domestic but not on a boiler. Don't know how well they'll hold up to the elevated temperatures over time.
 
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Old 12-17-13, 06:31 PM
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No leaks after 3years, but I dare not try to sweat in something near one of those. I did bypass the cold well water going into DHW tank by first passing thru the coil in the reverse indirect tank. I was careful and wrapped the fittings with a very wet towel before heating near the crimp joint.
 
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Old 02-04-14, 03:20 PM
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NJ Trooper,
Seems like a slow night on the forum. Any chance you could think about this for a bit? Pics poorly lit due to overhead lights messing with iPad.
 
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Old 02-04-14, 03:57 PM
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Hi Thomas, sure... sorry we kinda 'swept ya under the rug'... it IS kinda slow tonight... you watch though, the excrement is gonna hit the fan just cuz we said that!

Quickly going back, it seems you are looking for reason that lower level isn't heating well?
 
  #55  
Old 02-04-14, 04:12 PM
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Very slow tonight...no doubt things will pick up as the snow ad ice head our way! Hope you have a Generator ready...oh, wait, your going to be missed!
I'm on the forum most nights, but this stupid iPad keeps logging me out, so I don't bother logging in unless I got something to say.
Yes, heating issue on the lower level (garage level) for split level with 1/2 basement. Old boiler with circulator on return had no issues keeping the lower level rads hot. New system does not heat the lower level with the ek1 circulator. I did notice plumbing gets small when passing thru zone valve. Old boiler did not have any zone valves...one of those hated thankless coil systems.
 
  #56  
Old 02-05-14, 04:37 PM
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I've spent the past day slowly reading and trying to visualize your system... quite something you've got going on there!

This diagram:



Doesn't really show the details of how the baseboards are piped, just a 'lump sum' above the EK1.

I can't visualize your description, and all those pipes in the pics make me dizzy!

Can you clear this part up for me? Is it as simple as the baseboards being split into two parallel loops with zone valves for each loop?
 
  #57  
Old 02-06-14, 06:03 AM
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NJ,
It is more simple that that. In pic 12 on photobucket, you can see the zone valve on the right and the large vertical pipe on the left. That vertical pipe branches out to 2 large pipes that run along the front and rear of the house, then they "Y" back to one return pipe. Off of the large pipes are the feeds and returns to each individual baseboard. The other day there were a series of posts where the guy was trying to diagram his flow with the directional T fittings marked with supply and return.
So to answer your question, that lump of baseboard is all all of the baseboard fed thru that singe zone valve shown in pic 12. That is the only zone valve on the boiler system. That small zone valve was not on the previous boiler to limit the flow...my theory anyway!
The three way valve ties in the woody.
And yes, whenever someone first looks at the system, they appear to be overwhelmed by the piping. It took me about a week to plumb everything in the evenings after work.
 
  #58  
Old 02-06-14, 06:59 AM
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Ohhhh... you have "diverter tees" !

With that in mind, I believe that you may not be developing enough 'head' to overcome the tee fittings resistance... maybe... let me think about it some more... need to 'grok' the whole setup.
 
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