System 2000 connected to a water heating wood stove?

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Old 11-20-10, 03:23 PM
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Question System 2000 connected to a water heating wood stove?

My Columbia Boiler is leaking (and shutdown) and I need to replace it ASAP.
(sorry this is so long)

Semi-Quick History:
I have a wood stove with built-in water pipes plumbed to my 10 year old Columbia boiler. An additional circulator and 3 way mixing valve circulates the water thru the wood stove pipe loop until the water temp reaches ~140F, then the 3 way valve re-directs the water to the boiler vessel loop. Once the water temp is at 180F, my wood stove control energizes the house circulator until the water temp is back down to ~140F, causing the house circulator to de-energize.
This has been working very well for the last 5 years or so, and I get free DHW.

It was time for a boiler cleaning, so I had my Oil guy come out. As he was cleaning it, the flue pipe practically disintegrated in his hands..then he noticed a white target mark on the back cover of the boiler. Well, apparently the steel is "weeping" water, so when the boiler fires, the water turns to steam...causing the flue to go bad.
Columbia is telling me this is my fault since I am causing condensation by sending hot water to the boiler tank, which created surface corrosion and the "weeping" steel. Forgive me, but the outside surface of a glass of hot water in a room does not condensate...but a glass of ice water will...apparently this is different with steel??? Columbia will not cover the warranted pressure vessel unless they first inspect it at their factory, so I will need to put up a grand to replace it, along with another two grand for 2 guys to break down and replace the vessel (labor not covered by warranty).
10 years old and 3 grand to repair...no way, I'll get a new one. (and I'll take any comments regarding the weeping steel issue).

Now I am looking at a System 2000 with an external storage tank. This is where I need someone's help. As best I can tell from EK's website, the external storage tank is only for DHW and recovery of excess boiler heat.
Does anyone know if this system can be re-configured so my wood stove can feed EK's largest water storage tank, but also use the tank as the baseboard water tank (and not just for DHW)? My wood stove is capable of keeping my house plenty warm on a windy 10 degree day (as long as I gave it wood), so I don't want to give up what I previously had.
 
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Old 11-20-10, 04:39 PM
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System 2000

I seriously doubt any boiler manufacturer will warrant any fossil fuel fired boiler when connected to a wood fired boiler. The System 2000 is a highly efficient & complex device & from the sound of what you want to do, I doubt it would work much less work well.
 
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Old 11-20-10, 07:49 PM
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Thanks for the feedback. I did talk to someone at EK Friday who said they have a drawing of a system with a wood stove connection. They would not send it to me since I am not a dealer. I asked if he would send this document to the guy(s) who are coming to give me estimates on Monday, and he said he would.

EK claims they have a solar panel system that can provide DHW and heat, but if you view how the solar panel system works on their website, it does not show the heating portion, just the DHW. Now assume my wood stove is a solar panel!

I was hoping someone out there already has a similar combination hooked up, since this has apparently already been done.

I just want to heat the storage tank water with the wood stove (or the EK1). The storage tank's job would be to provide the heating of the DHW or the hydronic baseboard water. The EK1's job would be to heat up the tank water when the water temp falls (if I am not feeding the wood stove), regardless of what is cooling the water from the storage tank. I am sure this is not standard operation for the EK1.

I think the key to the EK1 is it is a cold start system, so it only needs to fire when needed. All summer running a solar panel would probably never need to fire the EK1.
I will see what the sales guys come up with on Monday.
 
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Old 11-20-10, 07:56 PM
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I'm no EK expert by a long shot, never seen one... but am under the impression that the 'storage tank' you mention is a domestic indirect hot water tank. I don't think it in any way contributes to the space heating circuit.

I think that if you plan to heat primarily with wood, that choosing an EK would be WAY overkill for your application. I would very much lean toward a cast iron boiler, standard efficiency, and a BUFFER TANK such as a 'Boiler Buddy' (see their website). The EK is a fairly low volume boiler... not much water in it to store the heat from the wood stove. In your application, a much larger water volume would be a huge advantage, because you would have a big 'battery' you could charge up... just something to think about.
 
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Old 11-21-10, 09:01 AM
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Thanks for the comments. I will discuss that option when the sales guys show up tomorrow.

I do use the wood stove as a heat source, but I don't consider it as my primary heating source because I feel myself becoming more lazy now that I've crossed the 40 mark. Cutting down trees, splitting and stacking is a lot of work, but we love how the stove heats the house...it is a different kind of warmth.

So my plan is to become more efficient and maybe still use less oil and burn less wood. My biggest problem with my current system (other than the dead boiler) is once the house is up to temp, I still need to fire the house circulator or let the fire burn out. So the concept of a hot water storage "battery" is very appealing and would make my system 10 times better.

I hope EK truely does have an "integratable renewable energy solution" like they claim on their website.
 
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Old 11-21-10, 09:27 AM
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Hey HeatPro!

... you might wanna weigh in on this one! ...

I know about gettin' older! Too soon old, too late smart!

In that case then, the EK might make sense if you do plan to slowly move more toward burning ancient pressed algae.

If it does turn out that the 'storage tank' is but an indirect, and does not contribute to the volume of the heating system water, then you might still want to explore the concept of adding a buffer tank in ADDITION to the EK... whether or not that will mess up the EK's 'brain' with the larger volume system or not, is a question for our friend HeatPro... I believe that there is a BoilerBuddy model that has an extra set of ports on it as well.

As far as wood stoves go, the modern wood BOILERS are designed with automatic AIR DAMPERS that regulate the combustion air, and thereby the fire, in response to water temp. It sounds as though yours does not have this feature... that you constantly have to 'dump' heat... and open the windows!
 
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Old 11-21-10, 10:44 AM
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The wood stove is by no means modern! It was pulled out of my 70 year old neighbor's basement after he decided to get married again and knock his house down to build a new one. It does have an air damper to control air flow (auto-closing if power is lost), most likely from an air duct control. When the water temp reaches 180F, the air damper closes.

When 180F is reached AND if my second thermostat is calling for heat, the house circulator fires.
I planned and built my stove control with a second thermostat, but the idea of the fire smoldering for hours (at low temps) could eventually create problems in the chimney, so I prefer to set the second thermostat really high so it is always calling for heat when the stove reaches temp.

With a storage tank, I could still burn and burn, then save the hot water for at night when the fire burns down and the house temp drops.
 
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Old 11-21-10, 12:08 PM
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Angry

I was just poking around and found a post on an outdoor wood burner from earlier in the month. Central Boiler make those barn looking outdoor stoves that are plumbed into your existing heating system.
Grady said no manufacturer would likely cover their boiler if it was hooked to a wood burner, so I wonder if people who buy those Central Boiler systems understand that.

Central Boiler's installation instructions show it direct plumbed into the pressurized boiler, just like I have it. So I guess many people are doing similar to what I am doing.

I guess I just got a lemon from Columbia Boiler (just like the oil service guy said), a lemon they won't cover without much expense to me!

I will make sure I contact Columbia Boiler so they can read this post, since they are not planning on helping me with the boiler.
 
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Old 11-21-10, 12:46 PM
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With a storage tank, I could still burn and burn, then save the hot water for at night when the fire burns down and the house temp drops.
Yeah, to an extent... you might not be able to save enough up to get through the night though. Remember your physics classes? It takes 1 BTU to raise 1 POUND of water 1 DEGREE. If you had an 80 gallon tank, and water weighs about 8 pounds a gallon, to raise the water from say 100 to 180 would require (80 gallons X 8 pounds) X 80 degrees = 51200 BTU . IF 100 degree water were enough to heat your home, and your home's heat loss was say 40000 BTU/HOUR (probably a high estimate, but for example only), then the water in that tank might be enough to heat the home for about an hour and 15 minutes.

Central Boiler's installation instructions show it direct plumbed into the pressurized boiler
No, I don't think so... if you look closely you will see that there are HEAT EXCHANGERS between the Central and the pressurized system. The outdoor boilers operate at atmospheric pressure.
 
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Old 11-21-10, 12:51 PM
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I will make sure I contact Columbia Boiler so they can read this post, since they are not planning on helping me with the boiler.
Good luck getting them to do that.

You are absolutely correct though that they are totally wrong about the 'condensation' claim. If you are keeping the water in the system HOT with the wood boiler, there is no way that anything is going to condense. But I'm not gonna go to court to testify for ya!

If you were running chilled water through the boiler, of course you can expect condensation... but not vice versa.
 
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Old 11-21-10, 12:59 PM
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But then, on the other hand, what DID cause the flue pipe to rust out? Which came first? Was it a boiler leak that caused water in the boiler to evaporate and condense on the inside of the flue pipe? That's my guess... and I don't believe that preheating the water caused the leak either...
 
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Old 11-21-10, 01:20 PM
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Thanks NJ Trooper,
It is nice to have someone tell me I could be right and it might not have been my fault!
I suspect the steel started to leak very lightly, then every time the burner fired, it initially created steam, then there goes the flue. I'm not really sure how steel "weeps", maybe an impurity in the steel.

The bigger issue is this could have resulted in a VERY deadly end result. Either my family dying from CO2 exposure and a house fire.

I just sent Columbia Boiler customer service a thank you e-mail explaining the problem and an extra thank you to their employee who made me think it was all my fault! unish:
I expect they will do nothing. Even if they did cover the pressure vessel, still 2 grand to replace it, and honestly the design, or more specifically the failure of the firewall material, scares the hell out of me. We could have died! I am unsure what other legal recourse I have, but I'll start with my company's legal attorney.

Yes, I remember my Physics classes at PSU (yes, I am an Engineer). I'm not expecting to get thru the night, just not bake us out when I am running the wood stove!

I did go back to Central Boiler's manual, and I believe you are correct that they send the water thru an exchanger first. My bad, but the general heating water concept is the same.
 
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Old 11-22-10, 06:16 AM
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System 2000 and wood boilers - perfect together. That's a paraphrase of a NJ state tourism slogan from a few years ago.

In truth, EK has no problem with a wood boiler connected to the system IF it's done correctly. There are a number of drawings to correctly tie them together, plumbing and electrical wise. Pressurized wood boilers are piped in parallel to the EK with no heat exchanger necessary. Non-pressurized wood boilers, such as the Central Boiler, do require a heat exchanger to protect the EK from oxygen corrosion. None of the drawings show a storage tank for use when the fire dies down, instead, a simple switching relay setup will allow the oil burner to run. If the wood boiler is restoked the oil burner is automatically switched off. It's a fairly simple setup that's been used for about 20 years.
 
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Old 11-22-10, 10:05 AM
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HeatPro,
You sound very knowledgable about this particular subject.
I understand the parallel connection, I think. Does this sound correct:

1) The EK uses the heat exchanger to heat the DHW storage tank water.

2) If the house is calling for heat, the EK fires and the house circulator starts, using the 2+ gallons inside the EK and the water in the radiant system are one in the same. No heat exchanger needed.

My wood stove is not able to maintain the process of increasing the house temperature, so right now the circulator turns on and off and slowly brings the house up to temp as the wood stove re-heats the boiler water. Adding a relay control would cause the EK to be turned on and off quite frequently, which would probably not be good for it.

I want the EK not to know I even have a wood stove connected, plus I want to be able to store hot water from the stove, but I don't want the EK to "maintain" the temp in my wood stove if I get lazy and do not feed the fire (with a direct connection).
I would prefer the wood stove heat a separate storage tank of water. I could plumb in a tank bypass 3-way AC valve controlled by a Honeywell NC/NO sensor. If the Storage tank water is hot enough, the sensor automatically connects the storage tank into the radiant water return loop. Radiant heater loop return water would then pass thru the storage tank prior to getting back to the EK, thus pre-heating it.

The downside I can think of is there will be a point that the EK would be heating the tank water if the fire dies down and my existing control automatically shuts down. I could force the 3-way to remove the storage tank from the system at control shutdown, but all the hot water I created would not get used.
Then again, so what if the EK has to maintain extra water? If the 3-way valve intially adds the storage tank to the system only if the tank water is initially hot, maintaining the water temp in the very well insuated tank is probably not going to kill efficiency.

I'll see the the authorized dealer's sales guy says later today.
I will also make sure there is no outside control on this system since that just adds more complication to the system.

Thanks again for your help HeatPro and NJ Trooper! I will let you know the results.
 
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Old 11-22-10, 04:06 PM
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ThomasDB,
Heatpro better be VERY familiar with EK. He works (worked?) for them & has bailed me out a few times.
 
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Old 11-22-10, 04:34 PM
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I understand what HeatPro is saying about setting up the controls to automatically change over from the woody to the oiler if the fire dies down and you certainly do want to do that... but my point about the buffer tank was not so much for that reason.

With a low water volume system in which the heat source can be turned on and off, you might not want or need (in some cases you would though) a larger water volume.

In the case of a wood fired (or coal) system you can't just turn off the fire instantly... so it really would/does help to have a storage tank ... some place to store them BTUs that are 'excess to your immediate need'.

It might in fact make a lot of sense if the buffer tank were placed BETWEEN the woody and the EK. Let the woody store it's output in the buffer tank, and the EK system to draw from that buffer tank if it's hot.
 
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Old 11-23-10, 08:59 AM
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Not sure if I can say this, but Oil guy came out to give me a quote yesterday...the other guy had to cancel due to too many no heat calls.

The guy was very knowledgable on the EK and Buderus systems.
I don't think I can say what was estimated( not yet received official quote), but close to double on a std system. A system with a second storage tank for the wood stove water added a few k.

I had an idea to replace the std DHW tank with a Buderus SM-300 dual coil tank (77 gal, since the SM-400 will not fit thru the basement door).

The wood stove water will pass thru an added Plate heat exchanger on the radiator return loop then go thru the lower coil on the tank. I will add a 3-way Honeywell valve and a differential temp sensor to control the valve and possibly bypass the plate heat exchanger. If the water temp in my wood stove loop is higher than the radiant return pipe temp, wood stove water heats the reurn water. I would need/prefer EK to allow me to override the house circulator to make this work perfectly (heat dump). If wood stove water temp is lower than the return temp, the 3-way valve takes the plate out of the loop so the EK is not heating the wood stove, just the DHW. Yes, I know the DHW will get hot, but that is how my current system works. I already have a 3-way and aquasta just off the stove set to 140F, so when I first start the stove, water only circulates back to the stove, and not thru the boiler.

Last night and this morning was the first time since 11/8 (boiler shut down) that I could not burn due to warm temps outside. Cold showers stink!!!
 

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Old 11-23-10, 09:53 AM
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the other guy had to cancel due to too many no heat calls.
Strike one and two as far as I would be concerned... strike 1 for the cancellation, strike 2 for the REASON for the cancellation... WHY do his customers have so many no heat calls?

The wood stove water will pass thru an added Plate heat exchanger on the radiator return loop then go thru the lower coil on the tank.
Something don't sound right about that... your stove is capable of being pressurized, correct? What is the purpose of the heat exchanger? And tying into the return line? that ain't zackly right neither... the woody should be in parallel with the oiler...
 
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Old 11-23-10, 02:31 PM
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No new customer from the guy who cancelled.
I've seen the other company's trucks around...the guy is an authorized installer...and he passed my sketch of the system to the Engineers at EK for review and hopefully a thumbs up (even though I don't plan on using their storage tank).

Yes, the wood stove is pressurized. I do not want to include it the loop and I don't want the EK to be heating the stove water if the stove water is at a lower temp (call me cheap!). Plus the wood stove temp would crash quickly if I tied it directly to the heating loop. That was my original configuration with the existing boiler. First time trying it out, as soon as the circulator started to run from a call for heat, I watched the temp on everything drop and drop, until the boiler kicked on to heat the system, which is not what I wanted to do.

Wife telling me it is dinner time...I'll finish the reasons later.
 

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Old 11-23-10, 02:59 PM
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You do understand that if you run the woody as a closed loop on the other side of the HX that you will need another feedwater setup, air scoop, expansion tank, relief valve, etc... yes?

From what you've said about the woody, I get the impression that there isn't a lot of water volume in it either, is that right?
 
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Old 11-23-10, 03:04 PM
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I still feel that installing the HX in the return leg of the system is not the right way to approach. The ONLY time that any heat will be exchanged is when the space heating pump is running. You really want to be able to pump that heat into the boiler, and the best way to do that is to circulate the water through the HX in parallel with the boiler.

I'm sure you can achieve the 'isolation' that you are looking for with a few properly placed check valves... a LOT more cheaply than the FP HX ... them suckers ain't cheap.. but maybe you've got one laying around it sounds like?
 
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Old 11-23-10, 04:42 PM
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The more you talk, the more I am changing my mind! Stop making me second guess myself

Seriously...appreciate the insight.

Understand I will need the feed water and small expansion tank if I go that route.
Already have an extra scoop and pressure relief in the wood stove loop part of the system. Stove water volume low, maybe 5 gallons max.
I've checked onlike for places that sell the HX by EK, but was unable to find any (no, none laying around). Any ideas where online I can see the prices of those?

I was planning on overriding the house circulator (just like I currently do) when high temp water was available.
But I will take your advise and consider not using the HX. I will consider a true parallel system using the wood stove circulator and an additional 3-way valve and some well placed aquastats to open and close things. Although, not sure if my small stove circulator will be able to move the water up high enough. I have about 10ft head to the highest radiator (split level home).

Let me think about this.. circulate wood stove to wood stove when temp less than 140F. Circulate to the DHW tank above 140F by closing first 3-way valve. On a heat call from my second t-stat and provided the wood stove water temp was at least 150F, I'd have to open the DHW tank valve and close a second 3-way value to tie into the radiant return loop. The relatively cold loop return water will eventually drop the stove water temp to 145F, at which time the second 3-way will open.
I'll need to sketch this one out.

I really like the Honeywell VC series 3-way valves (if you haven't guessed). They take 120VAC, are easy to control with SPDT aquastats, and draw no power once they complete the position change. A bit hard to find on the internet, however. No 24VAC transformer to sit there and suck power.
 
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Old 11-23-10, 06:02 PM
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I had some time to think about it.

The reason I plan on using the heat exchanger AND the dual coil 77 gallon DHW tank in series is to use the tank as a buffer device.

In a normal burn cycle, usually in the evening after work, I start the fire and eventually it gets way too hot in the house. To help solve/mimimize that, I want to "charge" the DHW tank temp as high as 180 F. If I reach 180 F, I want to start the house circulator to bleed off some of the heat (heat dump), otherwise the EK runs normally and the HE contributes, or assists, to heating the return radiant loop water unless I reach DHW tank temp of 140F. If I reach 140F, the first 3way valve closes until the stove to stove water temp gets back up to ~145.
Once the radiant return loop water temp is higher than the stove water temp, the HE will be removed from the loop so I do not heat the wood stove water with the EK.

I expect the assist to occur on the coldest of winter nights, otherwise I expect to still be heat dumping, but with a longer time before that occurs.

Expensive, probably..but you can't take it with you they say.
Hey, I'm an Engineer..things need to be complicated!
 
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Old 11-23-10, 07:37 PM
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Although, not sure if my small stove circulator will be able to move the water up high enough. I have about 10ft head to the highest radiator (split level home).
I'll think about this more tomorrow when I'm not as sleepy... but wanted to point out what appears to be a slight misconception...

In a CLOSED system, the pump itself only has to overcome the friction of the piping, and does not have to worry about the height of the system at all. In other words, system height has no bearing at all on the pump size. (unlike an OPEN system like a well pump pushing water uphill). All the pump has to do in a closed system is add energy to the water and start the 'ferris wheel' turning. For every foot that water travels UP on one side of the system, GRAVITY is pulling water DOWN on the other side. The ferris wheel analogy fits perfectly.

What gets the water to the top of a closed system is the STATIC pressure in the system, you need 0.432 PSI of static pressure for every foot of system height (plus about 4 PSI of 'headroom' on top of that).

Your small pump is likely big enough.

Hey, I'm an Engineer..things need to be complicated!
S'OK, I understand!
 
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Old 11-24-10, 04:17 PM
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Thanks,
I did a bit more research on head calculations for closed and open loop systems...and you are correct, no static head in a closed loop.

My wood stove has a Taco 006-B4, 1/40HP pump.
Taco chart shows 0GPM @ 8 head-feet and 12 GPM @ 0 head-feet for this pump.
I chose this one back when for its low energy use and short pipe length.

Further research on friction head loss, I found a chart for copper pipe size with axis for GPM flow rate and Head loss ft/100ft of pipe. I studied it for a while..then gave up because it didn't make sense. The 3/4" pipe line did not even overlay the 10GPM vertical line..maybe I'm just tired and it is not sinking into my brain right now, but it seems like if I extended the 3/4" until it reached the flow rate, head loss would be very very high. Also found a single 90 degree elbow translates into about 1+ foot of pipe length. There are a lot of elbows in my heating loop.

I'm still convinced I should isolate the wood stove water from the heating loop with the plate heat exchanger.
 
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Old 11-25-10, 07:20 AM
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I've checked onlike for places that sell the HX by EK, but was unable to find any (no, none laying around). Any ideas where online I can see the prices of those?
Brazed Plate Heat Exchangers. Flat Plate Heat Exchanger. Hydronic Heating Systems. PEX Radiant Heat Systems

Can't tell ya what size ya need, but there is some application info if poke around the various pages there...

There is a lot of good info to be had on system design here:
You might need to poke around a bit to find the stuff, but there are several good reads that explain how to calculate head loss, etc...

Literature English - Centrifugal Pumps Submittals, Commercial Products Catalog of pumps, Valves, Isolation Flanges, Flo-Control Valves, Air Removal Devices, Relief Valves, Tank Fittings, Zone Control Valves, Compression Tanks, Air Vents, Air Valves,

Also look under "Technical Help" at the 'Counterpoint' 'Tech Talk' and 'KnowledgeBase' stuff
 
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Old 11-25-10, 08:26 AM
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Thomas, it might help if you could sketch up your ideas and scan them and put them up on photobucket for us to view...

Also, given the fact that you would like to use the HX with the woody on it's own closed system, I really would strongly consider the use of a buffer tank to add some volume to that loop.
 
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Old 11-25-10, 11:00 AM
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Happy Thansgiving!
Thanks for the links...I'll take a look.

The best way to do this would probably be just to bite the bullet and buy a second storage tank to add the volume I need to store the hot water from the wood stove.
I was trying to avoid this.

Add the tank with a 3-way valve into the radiant feed loop and have either the EK circulator run, or add another (or increase the size of the circulator already in the system) for direct circulation into the radiant loop parallel to the EK, as someone already suggested. No additional expansion tank or fill valve needed.
 
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Old 11-25-10, 12:13 PM
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I don't have a clear mental picture of everything that you've said you had in mind so far... a visual thinker... so if you can crank out a diagram I might get on board with your plan.

I did forget that you were thinking of using the indirect as some sort of storage, so that might negate the need for another tank.

Happy Thanksgiving! Turkey is almost done...
 
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Old 11-26-10, 09:04 PM
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I'm not ignoring your request...
Laid out the system in a old mechanical drawing package...trying to get a free PDF generator working so I can post it.
 
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Old 11-26-10, 09:25 PM
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No prob, we'll be here when ya get it.
 
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Old 11-26-10, 09:47 PM
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Yeah! Finally figured out how to get it into a viewable format and get it up here. I'm not so internet savvy.
I posted it in JPEG, PCN and GIF formats.


I hope it works and you can see it.
 
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Old 11-26-10, 09:52 PM
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Old 11-27-10, 06:26 AM
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Yup, works for me!

Why is there a HX between the EK and the indirect? How is anything going to flow from that HX into the indirect coil?
 
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Old 11-27-10, 06:35 AM
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What happens if ya got a fire goin' in the woody, and there's a power failure ?

Heat dump requires power = scary.
 
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Old 11-27-10, 07:24 AM
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I am not really sure why there is an HX between the EK and the indirect tank. I think maybe I saw that on their website as part of the system...maybe I am wrong. I'll check their website again.

On power failure, the wood stove air control shuts down...it is one of those Honeywell 'close when power is removed' air duct dampers. Yes, that has always scared me with my current system since the fire is still smouldering but the stove circulator has stopped. This should be a problem with any 'pipe-in-the-firebox' or water jacketed system. To solve this problem in the future, I am building a thermoelectric generator, or TEG (let me remind you I am an Engineer). This will be mounted against both sides of the small water storage tank on the wood stove (temp does not exceed 180F on this area). My hope is to generate enough power to charge a 12V battery, and on power failure continue to run the circulator. If I get lucky and am able to generate lots of power, I really want the TEG to completely power my control system, circulator and air control (about 90 watts) when a fire is lit so it is self sustaining.
 
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Old 11-27-10, 10:24 AM
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I've been doing some more thinking about your parallel system idea...having the wood stove circulator push the hot water thru the house. I'll post an alternate design soon.

I have a Taco 221 Universal Flowchek where one input is not used. I looked it up online and the check valve is only on the output. So I guess circulating into one input could cause a backflow into the second input??

Does anyone know a good check valve I can add?

Regarding the HX between the indirect and the EK, EK's website appears to show this in their system.
 
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Old 11-28-10, 09:20 AM
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New layout is posted...see link. If it does not post correctly, I'll try again.
System2000_with_wood_stove pictures by tdboris - Photobucket

Please give me any comments on the design, or better yet, any improvements I could make. This will use the existing expansion tank and water fill...and less doo dads to keep things operating properly (less smarts required...K.I.S.S. !) and more reliable.

I think I've prevented any unwanted flow of water from the indirect tank to the wood stove loop if the fire is not lit.

The 165F aquastat sensor will have a 15 degree differential. It will start to circulate thru the radiant baseboard at 165F and continue until the water temp drops to 150F, using the 77 gallon water tank as the 'buffer'. 77 gallons from 165F to 150F should allow more time circulating thru the baseboards. I know I could target a higher initial start point (say 175F), but this would require another aquastat since I am not sure if Honeywell has a 25F differential aquastat.
 
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Old 12-06-10, 02:46 PM
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Thanks Trooper for your help and input the other week.
Attached link shows the system diagrams, both mechanical and electrical.
This will be installed next week.
Mechanical: http://i1208.photobucket.com/albums/...oodStoveV2.jpg
Electrical: http://i1208.photobucket.com/albums/...calDiagram.jpg
 
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Old 12-14-13, 09:47 AM
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Thumbs up

Hi NJ Trooper and HeatPro,
Wanted to stop in to the forum to say thank you for your advise back in 2010. System is working perfectly and we are only using about 200 gallons of oil for a full year of heat and hot water with burning wood.
 
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