Riello F3-F5 oil burner leaking

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  #121  
Old 06-26-11, 10:32 PM
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Originally Posted by Grady View Post
From where did that picture come? I didn't think the pressure was that low.
A draft gauge would be the best instrument to use. Finding a manometer to read that low reliably isn't going to be easy.

A smoke test tells you how cleanly the burner is firing. One needs a smoke pump to do it.
True Spot Smoke Tester Kit, Pump, Scale, Filter Paper | eBay
That's the picture of the pressure switch I posted a while back in the thread; measuring the pressure at the flue outlet. If the chimney got blocked up then presumably the pressure would rise above the threshold and shut down the burner.
It does seem like a really low cutout pressure, but that's what Energy Kinetics uses in their installation; it's a custom part number that the switch manufacturer made for EK. I guess they felt it's critical for proper operation to have a very free flowing outlet.
When I was having the problem during the winter, it was right at the threshold of cutout, because I found that I could get it to kick on simply by cupping my hand over the blower inlet to reduce some of the pressure, enough to get it to switch on. Then it would stay on, maybe because enough heat went up the chimney to create an updraft.
I later discovered it was this switch that was causing the burner shutdown, rather than anything with the oil pressure or ignition.
So as soon as the manometer comes in (it's suppsed to be able to measure down to a resolution of 0.01 inch W.C.), I can see if the actual pressure is anywhere near the 0.07+/- 0.02 inW.C. that this switch is supposed to operate at.

So it looks like the smoke test basically takes a sample of the flue gas, passing it through a filter, and seeing how clear it is- interesting, no chemical reaction used for testing.

Thanks for the info-
 
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  #122  
Old 10-14-11, 08:27 AM
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Grady, Can you tell me with the Riello fuel oil pump, part 3007802, how would I set the pump pressure? My old pump developed a seal leak between the pump and motor so I decided on just putting in a new pump because of the age. Can I simply just put a gauge in the bottom right side opening and adjust pressure while its running till I reach 150 lbs ( if this the correct setting)? Is there like on a carburator needle valve, 1 & 1/2 turns out is will be fairly close?
 
  #123  
Old 10-14-11, 07:50 PM
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DO NOT try to screw a gauge with pipe thread into the pump. To do so will damage the threads on the pump & you'll be buying another one. The threads on Riello pumps are metric & being so an adapter is needed. Riello pumps come preset to 140 or 145# (I don't remember which). Don't even think about trying to adjust the setting without a gauge. Here is the adapter. Patriot Supply - C7001071
To use it you remove the bleeder & install the gauge with adapter in the bleed port.
 
  #124  
Old 10-16-11, 11:26 AM
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I knew about the metric thread but didn't know about the preset adjustment of 145 lbs. How do I go about bleeding this new pump. I noticed oil coming from the bleeder but at the top of the pump opening leading to the nozzle nothing comes out of there, which would be the high point. Do I need to run the pump to get oil to that point? Also, would it be better to have a service tech check the pressure or would that be a waste of time and money? I did talk to the tech. where I bought the pump and they said it would be approx. 65 bucks to check the pressure and check draft, etc. The air blower is set at 4.5 and the draft is set when the boiler kicks on the damper will open slightly but nearly swings shut when boiler shuts down. Thx Grady
 
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Old 10-16-11, 11:57 AM
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You need to run the burner until you get a full flow of oil out of the bleeder with no foam or air bubbles. After doing so, close the bleeder & the burner should fire. Riello burners have a pre-purge time of 15-30 seconds before the valve will open allowing oil to the nozzle.

An afterthought: If you have two oil lines coming from the tank to the pump, the bypass plug must be installed in the pump. If it is a single line, DO NOT install the bypass plug because if you do, you WILL blow the shaft seal out of the pump resulting in (1) a mess & (2) having to buy another new pump.
 
  #126  
Old 10-16-11, 02:09 PM
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Thanks, what was your thoughts on the service tech? This is a single line system. I'm a little confused about the bypass plug. If the plug isn't installed, which it is in mine and I think you mean the plug in the bottom of the pump next to the inlet supply, wouldn't oil just spray out everywhere?
 
  #127  
Old 10-16-11, 03:25 PM
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No, the 'bypass plug' is INSIDE the pump... only accessible by removing the return line... it's an allen key plug... Grady will explain further...

Was there a small screw thingy with an allen key fitting in the box ? Was there any tag on the pump which said "Bypass Plug Installed" ?

The bypass plug looks like this:


image courtesy heating-parts.co.uk
 
  #128  
Old 10-16-11, 04:55 PM
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No , didn't see any of those things. The allen wrench plug I see ( that wasn't on my old pump) is right on the front cover at about 1 oclock. I thought it was probably for the hydraulic jack? So your saying that if I remove the return plug ( the plug beside the supply line on the bottom of pump) there will be a allen wrench plug under it? Does it need removed?
 
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Old 10-16-11, 05:38 PM
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Yes, I'm pretty sure that it's in the same place on the Riello pumps as it is on the Suntec (Beckett), but Grady is the Riello expert around here... I know next to nothing about them except what I read in the service manual.

Yes, if it is installed, it needs to be removed for single pipe.
 
  #130  
Old 10-16-11, 08:25 PM
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The bypass plug is installed as Trooper said. To confirm you can remove the return plug on the bottom of the pump & look for something which would take a 2.5 mm allen key. Nothing for an allen key but threads visible other than those the removed plug would screw into means no plug. I wouldn't spend the $65 to have a tech simply check the pump pressure.

If you get fuel out of the bleeder but nothing out of the nozzle port there could be any of several problems. The easiest to check is the solenoid coil. Simply remove it from the pump, put a screwdriver in the hole where the stem goes & start the burner. In about 15 seconds you should feel the electromagnet engage. A couple of seconds later the burner should shut down.
 
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Old 10-16-11, 09:03 PM
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Ok, so if I understand, with my one line system, I do not want the return plug in the pump. Make sure all connections are tight, open up bleeder and turn on boiler and let pump run till oil flows without air. I'm Good to go right. What keeps the burner from trying to light while this is going on or is this 15 second delay you talked about?
 

Last edited by gizwhammer; 10-16-11 at 09:25 PM.
  #132  
Old 10-17-11, 09:22 AM
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Thanks fellas, for the help. This pump was a hard item to get locally with out ordering it. I did find a dealer nearby that does boilers and had this pump in stock. It was new but not in a box. I checked for the by-pass plug, which there was an internal thread just pass the plug thread like you said Grady but no plug was in there. Only took about 6 seconds before it was shooting a steady flow of oil once I turned it on. Burner ignited quieter than I have ever heard before. I did notice on my old pump that the internal screen was nearly 90% covered with deposits. Its a wonder I got any oil to the nozzle. You saved me a service call too, with telling me that was already preset pressure. You guys have helped me keep this thing running several times. I'm kinda the type that try to fix things myself instead of hiring it out. Thanks again.
 
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