Kagi Waste oil burner questions


  #41  
Old 02-19-11, 11:14 AM
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My login timed out & I lost all that I tried to post so let's dig in again.
Thanks to Rick for keeping you @ a -2 nozzle. Everything in his post is right on.
After getting this thing reliable you can try a -3. I think there is a "cast in place"
product or for now firebrick may work but lets get the burner to work first. From
your posts I think that you NEED MORE DRAFT! NJ Trouper hit it right. Think about
how much compressed air you are putting in there. I looks like you are necked
down @ the draft inducer.? Starting the draft inducer before the burner fires
will help initial startup. I didn't want to have to mention this but; the air switch
in the burner controls the timing of the oil solenoid. The allen adj. screw is Loctited
but will move. REMEMBER WHERE YOU STARTED! CCW lowers the setting & starts
the oil sooner which MIGHT be needed with the small nozzle & lower oil pressures,
helping initial startup. Please try to increase your draft first!
Was the vid. that I e-m'ed you helpful?
Note the pressures & airband. I blocked (taped) off one set of openings, making
the adjustment less sensitive and more friendly for the small nozzle. EVRYTHING
on this burner with WVO is sensitive & critical. What are your boiler temp settings?
The hotter the better without boiling. A slight hiss for a minute or LESS after the
burner shuts down is perfect. I start @ 155 & go to 192. I can see from your pics
that you have done allot of meticulous work. Craftsmanship, humm, very rare these
days. You are sooooo close. Please em me & let me know if any of this helps.
Burn ON.
 
  #42  
Old 02-19-11, 03:52 PM
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Now I did it... I tried installing the new primary (Carlin 60200-2) according to directions from AgSolutions (which differed slightly from the schematic from Carlin). The burner started up and was spraying oil, but no ignition. I double checked and everything was as directed. I pulled the new primary and put the old one back on, (following Kagi schematic) The burner started up and sprayed oil, but no ignition. Now I wonder, did the igniter get messed up by an incorrect primary hookup? I am 100% certain that I put the old one back on correctly, and all wires are where they were when I started.



I replaced the draft prover switch that the installer broke. Now it says I have insufficient draft, as everyone here has already pointed out (you guys are too smart!)
Installer removed all of the sealant and had adjusted the broken switch to such a low level that a mosquito fart would trigger it. So now I need to increase the draft. To test the boiler while installing the new primary I put the old busted one back on with the scabbed plastic hose and copper tube. It worked to convince the power vent control to allow the burner to start.

Allwayslearning>>>>> the vid helped, but I still feel clueless. My boiler temps: on at 140 off at 155. I dont have a tempering valve set up yet, and I can't get my floors too warm. Once I get the thing going strong I will tackle the tempering valve issue and kick it up a few notches.


SOOOOOO, how do I figure out the problem with the ignition? How do I convince my wife not to shoot me for thinking up this crazy idea?
 
  #43  
Old 02-19-11, 09:12 PM
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If the motor runs, you should have an arc. I can't see how you could possibly
hurt the transformer. There is a rat's nest of wires in these things. The only
reasons for no ignition arc are; wrong switch position, loose or bad electrical
connection to the transformer, shorting of the secondary (arc) voltage
including @ the electrodes/retention head, or a bad transformer. Ck all
Connections including the factory crimped on connectors. If you are comfortable
doing so & need to, test the transformer. The temps I've posted are for the
benefit of the operation of the burner. The combustion chamber needs to reach
a stable temp for proper adjustment and efficiency. You need more differential
and a minimum start temp of 150. Until you fix this and the draft you are banging
your head against a wall. Please first things FIRST.
As far as your wife is concerned, tell her that if she shoots you,
she will never have heat.
 
  #44  
Old 02-19-11, 10:52 PM
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Thanks for the straight shooting...

I will check all the wires and crimp connections tomorrow. Perhaps one of the wires pulled loose from the switch.

I ordered the draft inducer based on the recommendation of the installer, who I now know is completely incompetent. :NO NO NO: The inducer is 4”, and the flue is 6”, so it reduces in size at the inducer by 2”. The pipe is also single wall... I assume it should be double wall, right?

I am going to pick up a mixing valve asap and get it set up. Any suggestions? Can I use the storage tank as the tempering water? I don’t have enough temperature differential between the outgoing water and the return water unless I change the piping. I think it is roughly 15 degrees now, and Taco states 20 is the minimum. If I want to set the boiler minimum to 150 degrees and the maximum to 180, I will need to temper the water down to 145 degrees. That way my floor temp will end up at roughly 82-84. Any hotter than that will be uncomfortable. I really only need the floor temp to be 80 to keep up with my heat loss.
 
  #45  
Old 02-20-11, 12:37 AM
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Let your wife shoot that installer!! I thought your stack was 8" into 6".
With 6" into 4" it's no wonder you have draft problems. As you now know
this burner is a different animal. Are you exhausting into a masonry chimney?
Please describe the stack system in detail. Double wall stack pipe is for insulating.
It will draft a little better (hotter conduit) but in your application won't make
a noticeable difference. As for your tempering problem, how much area are you
trying to heat? Where in NY are you located? How many and what type of zones do
you have? Can you simply install a bypass valve at the circulator to limit volume?
How was this area heated before & how well did it work? My burner is the same
as yours but my boiler & system are completely different. Someone who is truly
knowledgeable in hydronic heating can make your head spin if you can find one.
If you have floor heating, splitting it up so that you have a supply loop and return
loop with several taps & valves on each tap may give you comfort control as well
as allow you to use hotter water. I am now grasping at straws. Lets get the burner
to work reliably.
 
  #46  
Old 02-20-11, 01:57 PM
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I am exhausting through the rim joist with a Tjernlund VH1-4. The boiler is an Axeman-Anderson NPO87. http://www.axeman-anderson.com/pdf/npo.pdf The flue connection at the boiler is 6". The house was always heated with radiant floor heat since we built 7 years ago, and was originally heated with a 50 gallon propane DWH as seen in the pix. It worked well, but was inefficient and expensive do to the undersized heat source (all we could afford at the time... $200 DWH propane dealer special) It is still used as backup and the boiler water is constantly circulated into the tank. Our house is approximately 2100 SF, super insulated. The heat is even and pleasant throughout. We are located in western NY, between Buffalo & Rochester, and we get lake effect from Erie and Ontario. We have two equal zones currently, 1st & 2nd floor, each with a Grundfos circulator pump, no zone valves. We have a supply and return manifold on each floor, with 4 equal loops on each manifold.

Back to the burner. I just checked all wires, crimps and switches. All crimps and switches had solid connections. I cut stripped and reconnected all wires at the terminal strip. All stripped ends are sound and fully inserted into the terminal strip and tightened appropriately. The bus bar springs are positioned correctly to make contact with the igniter. I put it all back together and plugged it in. The burner started up, motor spun, and oil sprayed, but no click, no ignition. There was plenty of oil flowing as evidenced by the cloud coming out of my barometric damper after I pulled the plug.

I have an HV probe for my Fluke 27 FM multimeter… what specs am I looking for to test the igniter? Any other ideas?
 
  #47  
Old 02-20-11, 02:32 PM
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I forgot to mention, the electrodes are clean, and are gapped and positioned correctly. I traced every wire of the rats nest with the Kagi schematic and all connections are correct.
 
  #48  
Old 02-20-11, 10:15 PM
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First real job I had after college was in an old steam-electric generation station. We had a tiny little boiler, well, tiny to me, that burnt waste transformer oil. I suspect that your waste vegetable oil is similar in consistency and flash point. Spark ignition was VERY unreliable so an acetylene gas pilot was added since there was no natural gas in the plant. The spark transformer was energized with the gas solenoid valve and the spark ignited the gas which then ignited the oil.

Spark ignited gas pilots are common on commercial and industrial boilers and I'm surprised that your system is as reliable as it seems to be with just a spark ignition.
 
  #49  
Old 02-21-11, 03:26 PM
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You could disconnect BOTH primary wires from the transformer & plug them
into 110 VAC. You should get an arc across the electrodes. If not there may
be a short or open under the transformer or in the blast tube. I can't post
how I usually ck these things because you could get knocked on your a**.
Maybe it's time to call that "installer" and get something useful out of him?
It will be nice if he has a spare, as it will take a while to get a warrantee
replacement from Kagi.If no warrantee, getting one locally will be faster & maybe
cheaper. You could return that new control. Older style transformers produce
lower voltages than the newer ones, and MAY require less electrode gap. They
are ok for a spare but I recommend the high voltage type. Wire it for constant
ignition! I think your original control is fine. As Rick pointed out, the light needs
to get through the combustion head. With a -7 nozzle and your draft condition,
the flame must have been dark also. My chamber is 18" deep & open at the top.
I couldn't get a -3 nozzle to start reliably without impingement. (unburnt fuel
droplets hitting the target wall) A factory designed system is one thing, but in
these retrofit situations you need to see the flame and chamber in order to make
adjustments. Smoke analyzers won't help here. If your peep hole is too small you
may need to make it larger & fashion a cover. You may need to cut the welds
on the mounting flange & move it forward on the blast tube as I did, effectivly
making the chamber 1.5" deeper. Yes that little bit was critical! This cured
my impingement problems with the -2 nozzle & allowed me to run the oil @ about
3.9 psi. which provides reliable starts.
Don't get overwhelmed. Step by step will get you there.
 
  #50  
Old 02-21-11, 04:49 PM
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By the way, I collect my oil using a 100 micron suction strainer, let it settle
for 48hrs, then transfer it to my tank with a 50 micron suction strainer.
That's all. I don't heat my indoor tank. Your oil sounds GREAT. Unless I suck
up some bottom sludge during transfer, I can go all season without cleaning
the filter which is the same as the one that you have. I would however like
to condition the oil a little better. What is your operation like?
Also your DWH with constant circulation is the way to go. If you set your
temps right, it will take over if the WVO setup fails.
 

Last edited by allwayslearning; 02-21-11 at 05:05 PM.
  #51  
Old 02-21-11, 09:15 PM
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Allwayslearnig... I PM'd you for the good stuff we can't talk about here

I'm not sure if the 2" peep is big enough. It is often sooted up, so I have to clean it every time I want to make any adjustments. The oil doesn't seem to make it to the target wall, but it lands on the bottom for sure.

As far as I am concerned, the installer is dead to me. I will do my best to make sure AgSolutions doesn't recommend him again. He waited until I paid him to tell me he mine was the first he installed. he claims to be an expert at industrial sized waste oil burner conversions, but I doubt all words out of his mouth at this point.

I will put up some pix of my centrifuge setup tomorrow if I can , if not soon. I need my spark back. I'm calling Kagi tomorrow to see what they can do for me.

I bought the new controller on eBay at half price, and then got another for free because the first got beat up in shipping, so I will be better off putting them back on ebay if I don't use it. I really only wanted it for the alarm, and I can rig up something else to let me know I need to go hit the button.
 
  #52  
Old 02-22-11, 11:58 AM
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With my trusty widow maker power cord, I tested the igniter. A spark jumped acrose the electrodes right above the nozzle, as it should. I flipped open the igniter cover and very carefully tested at the main electrode contacts, and the arc jumped over an inch. Clearly, I need to re-check all internal wire connections yet again. Boy do I wish I installed the boiler the other way around so I had a bit more room around the burner to work. Hindsight is 20/20.
 
  #53  
Old 02-23-11, 01:28 PM
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It's alive! Burn baby burn!

I checked all the wires again, they still looked good, so I turned off the oil regulator, turned on the burner, observed the arc, and slowly turned up the regulator. It ignited and maintained combustion. I still have the draft prover switch bypassed. I will tape one set of air band holes and try to get better draft.
I am posting a video of the flame as soon as it finishes uploading. Here is a vid of the barometric damper. It used to pulse open and closed as it burned, now it is steady. http://s915.photobucket.com/albums/ac352/forgedcu/boiler%20setup/?action=view&current=00027.mp4
 
  #54  
Old 02-23-11, 02:21 PM
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So what exactly was the issue? Was the regulator not set properly? Has the fire shut down and restarted ok?
 
  #55  
Old 02-23-11, 04:24 PM
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Sadly, I am not sure. I am sure that the regulator was set correctly because it was not adjusted since it last ran correctly, and the lock nut was tight. I guess what appeared to be a good connection on one of the was in fact not a good connection, and in my many attempts, I finally made good on that attempt.

A call for heat came and went with no reaction from the boiler. No faults or lockout, just nothing but the backup heat kicking on. More wire checking to do tomorrow. Dealing with a sick wife and 13mo. twins at the same time is no fun.
 
  #56  
Old 02-23-11, 05:58 PM
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Great job! I had faith in you. Once the draft problem is solved, the prover
switch will help initial start. With the lower air band settings required for the small
nozzle combined with the draft problem, there isn't much combustion air to
blow the arc into the atomizing oil. I don't think that these burners were designed
for less than a -4 nozzle. There is very little room for adjusting the electrodes.
You want them out as far as possible without getting gunked up or shorting to the
retention head. The transformer mfg. has a max. gap. Find out what it is and
use that. I drilled & elongated a second screw hole in the retention head and
moved it out < 1/16". Sorry, had to use the less than symbol, it's been awhile.
My electrodes are all knarled up from bending with pliers and they got gunked
up quite a few times but I finally got it right. I wonder now if a ring behind the
retention head, shaped for narrowing the column of the combustion air would
help. Smaller nozzle = smaller tube? I'll try that during the off season. You
found the oil regulator trick before I could post back, kudos, but, if you pull
one wire off of the air pressure switch, the oil solenoid won't activate. You
can play with the electrodes and you won't need to re-adjust the regulator.
It can be a pain. If your boiler has small passages, I'd bet that it needs to be
cleaned in combination with you fixing the draft problem. Your peep hole should
never need cleaning beyond a quick wipe after a season or 4. That is evidence
of a big time lack of draft. It is easy to reduce draft so think big. Burn on!
P.S. Just now read your last post. Starting these things with the small nozzle is a battle.
Blowing the arc is key. Ck for a PM from me!
 
  #57  
Old 02-24-11, 08:04 AM
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What would cause the boiler not to heed a call for heat? The lower limit was passed and the boiler did not start. The power vent controller did not indicate a fault, and the vent was off. The primary did not indicate a fault. I unplugged the boiler and plugged it back in and it fired normally. This has happened several times since yesterday. This can't be related to draft, nor wiring if it starts normally after I unplug it and plug it back in. The reset button does nothing.
 
  #58  
Old 02-24-11, 11:54 AM
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The next time this happens, jumper the T T terminals. If it fires, the burner
is ok. Never "connect" a jumper here. Do it by hand so that you cannot walk away
with the jumper on! Pro burner techs have made this mistake.
 
  #59  
Old 02-24-11, 03:07 PM
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Not gonna add much to this, but I just want to add that this is a great thread.
I have dabbled with waste oil burners and feel your pain.
I gave in and walked anyway, I could as I did not rely on the boiler.

I really hope you get things sorted and I will keep reading and add where I can.
 
  #60  
Old 02-24-11, 05:57 PM
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It is a great thread, and I want to thank all the contributors once again...
 
  #61  
Old 02-24-11, 10:24 PM
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Aw geez, thanks, but y'all just think it's great because you're not the ones running up and down the stairs hitting the reset button!
 
  #62  
Old 02-25-11, 07:03 AM
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Ok, so my temp was below the limit this morning, and the boiler was off, with no faults indicated on the primary or the inducer controller. Jumping the T terminals (quickly) did start the boiler but not the powervent. Needless to say I didn't let it run. Unplugging and plugging back in worked, it started right up and is still running. Is it a problem with the inducer controller? (UC-1) It is not listed as a potential problem in the troubleshooting guide. Methinks I have opened a can of worms here.
 
  #63  
Old 02-25-11, 09:28 AM
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If the draft inducer doesn’t start, the prover should not allow the burner to start.
That's a good thing! I also added safeties for heater temp. & compressed air but
more on that later. Without knowing how things are wired I can't help much. You
do need a 6" draft inducer anyway. It could be the aquastat, the inducer, or its
control. A little tap with a screwdriver or a little wire wiggling may pinpoint the
trouble. If you could make a detailed sketch including model #s & e-m me or post
it, it would help. As you gain an understanding of how the system & all of its components
interact, it will suddenly become simple.
 

Last edited by allwayslearning; 02-25-11 at 09:54 AM.
  #64  
Old 02-25-11, 11:08 AM
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possible to post a wiring diagram ?
 
  #65  
Old 02-25-11, 04:10 PM
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He may post when he is finished shoveling.
 
  #66  
Old 02-25-11, 08:33 PM
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Ha! Finished shoveling? You are an optimist! I spent a few hours out there today, but I am no perfectionist. Pushing it around with a BX2530 loader bucket is not a pretty thing, unless you like giant snow sushi rolls coated in gravel. I can't afford the plow guy this year so it's good enough for me.

Ok... now shopping for 6" draft inducer and dreading the rework of the termination through the rim joist in the snow. I guess I'll step it down to the existing 4" hood near the hood, after the new inducer and see how it works :NO NO NO: (???)

It's still burning. I had to hit the reset a few times, and most of those would go... push click push click push click start. Then it would start and run fine till next cycle. The Inducer and draft fan are wired through the Tjernlund UC1 control, fed by boiler. http://www.tjernlund.com/tjernlund_8500004.pdf

Here is schematic for the boiler: [IMG]http://i915.photobucket.com/albums/a...tup/KagiWS.jpg[/IMG]

Here is a link to the primary control information (the one I want to use, not the one I am using) Carlin Combustion Technology - Technical Service Bulletin 011

I scored a $10.50 sparco 3/4" mixing valve on ebizzle including shipping like http://www.nofossil.org/manuals/am101mixingvalve.pdf. That should work well enough for me to raise the upper temp to 175 or so.
 
  #67  
Old 02-26-11, 06:18 AM
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Why keep on guessing what the problem is? I know it's gonna be miserable work to do it, but just make that thing 6" all the way out when you get the new inducer. Otherwise, it will always be a question as to whether it is still an issue or not.
 
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Old 02-26-11, 07:53 AM
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Why would you need the Carlin control? I think you'll need 6" all the way
but we'll see what happens. So, the TT on the burner commects to #s
3 & 4 on the UC1? What tells the UC1 that there is a call for heat,(terminals
A & B) an aquastat?
 
  #69  
Old 02-26-11, 09:33 AM
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The Carlin control is already in my possession, and would provide an alarm when it is in lockout. Terminals A&B on the UC1 are connected to the Honeywell L4081a aquastat. Terminals 3&4 on the UC1 are connected to the T terminals on the primary. L&N on the UC1 are pretty obvious… Line and neutral. Line is connected through the 750P-MT-120 LWCO. N terminal on the UC1 is connected out to the HS1 inducer (1.37A) and the inline combustion air fan (.35A). M terminal on UC1 is line out to HS1. MTR terminal on UC1 is line out to combustion air fan.

I have a 20 amp dedicated supply to the boiler. The combined load of the HS1 and combustion air fan is under 2 amps, so that should be ok wired as it is, right?

I am not anxious to change the inducer because it is routed through what I call grand central… the place where all of the wire is pulled for the first floor, where all of the radiant supply and return manifolds are, and also where the domestic water lines and propane line are routed. Oh, did I mention the central vac? When I ran it all that way back was building, I didn’t think of the need for a draft inducer for the boiler. I do accept the fact that it has to happen, though. Another $400 down the drain.



 
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Old 02-27-11, 06:19 PM
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The recent silence on this thread speaks volumes! I'm frightened. Is that some
kind of rope as a hanger? If that stack comes loose it could kill everyone in the
building with co! Why didn't you punch through the foundation? Please find a real
furnace installer who knows local code! Make the draft inducer the last part of
the stack indoors. The piping downstream of the draft inducer is pressurized!
I might be off base, or be paranoid about safety but I wouldn't do it like that.
I don't know what is on the outside of your house, but I would have a masonry
thimble to a masonry or double walled stainless chimney with a cleanout either
way. Screws in every indoor joint. If you exhaust below the peak of the building
you WILL; blacken the siding, etch the windows and have the gasses enter the
structure. Again maybe what you have is acceptable, but it scares me!

PLEASE will some of you knowledgeable HVAC GUYS CHIME IN?
 

Last edited by allwayslearning; 02-27-11 at 06:34 PM.
  #71  
Old 02-27-11, 06:47 PM
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I didn't spend a bunch of time looking at the pics I confess...

Now that you've pointed out that rope... hmmmmmmm... does look bad, don't it?
 
  #72  
Old 02-28-11, 10:22 PM
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Unhappy

Sadly, I thought I did hire someone knowledgable to do the install, but now I realize I did not. I have a CO2 alarm right next to the boiler, but that is not enough to make me feel safe now.... I feel like I have been robbed by this installer.

I guess I should just shut it down and put it by the curb at this point, since I have blown the last of my money on this system as it is. Until I find a job I have no money to upgrade anything, and no one I have spoken with is even willing to come look at the thing.

The vent is direct through the rim joist to a Tjernlund hood, approx 1.5 feet above grade on the north side of the house. Everything was done per his suggestions. It does seem to be in accordance with the Tjernlund installation instructions. I am not sure about code here. Permits are not needed for any of this type of work in this town or county.

I guess the good news is that spring will be here soon, so I won't have to worry about how to pay for the propane for too much longer.
 
  #73  
Old 03-01-11, 01:53 PM
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Angry

I had not yet shut the unit down today, and I went out to run some errands. My wife called frantically to tell me that the basement was filled with smoke. No alarms were going off. I told her to pull the plug and I made a beeline for home. The duct was still intact. I turned off the oil, and plugged the boiler back in. The power vent turned on, so I am not sure what was going on. I unplugged the boiler again, and went out to check the vent cap. There was soot on the ground under the vent cap. I am worried that the CO alarm and smoke alarm did not go off.

I am so discouraged, and feel violated. There is nothing I can do in regard to the installer, since it was basically off the books work. I am such an idiot.

My only hope now is to find work, and hopefully be able to afford the materials to make a boiler room attached to my garage and completely eliminate all chances of smoke and CO in my home. It is only a short run of less than 50 feet, so I assume I could use the dual line insulated pipe that they sell for outdoor wood boilers to get the hot water down to the rest of the system.

I’m in the hole now for almost 10k for this system, including the equipment for cleaning the oil. On one hand I want to do everything in my power to defame the installer and the product (since I hired the installer they recommended) on the other hand I want to sell the thing on eBay and walk away.
 
  #74  
Old 03-02-11, 02:49 PM
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I'm not sure, but it seems like everyone has abandoned me as a lost cause...

I have a straight chase with 8" flex insulated duct in my house that goes from basement to attic. I intended to use it for a Unico type air conditioning system at some point in the future. Could I pull that and use that chase to install a 6" class b vent pipe and terminate through the roof for a natural draft or assisted draft install? I don't have the room at grade to punch through the basement wall, which is poured concrete inside of ICF. I wouldn't mind stripping the drywall off of the chase to make sure everything is done right. The chase is above and approximately 6 feet to one side of the boiler. I could also move the boiler fairly easily to get it closer to the chase.

Any ideas?
 
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Old 03-02-11, 04:53 PM
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B-vent is only for gaseous fuels. There IS insulated metal piping for liquid fuels but I do not know the classification.

In my opinion you have learned an expensive lesson, heating with waste oils IS very much a "hands-on" operation. I would NEVER recommend waste oils for residential heating, even if the waste oil was free. There ARE methods of burning just about any kind of waste oil imaginable but there is also the strong possibility releasing many different, and some highly toxic, emissions into the atmosphere. Just because your region may not strictly control these emissions does not mean that it is a good idea.

What with your capital investment in the burner, centrifuge, settling tanks, air compressor and heaters along with the operating costs of all this it is probably a net loss unless you are paid to take the oil and even then if you have to transport and store a fairly large quantity of oil it just doesn't make economic sense.

I've burnt everything from waste jet fuel to number 2 (Diesel) fuel to high quality, low sulfur residual oil, to transformer insulating oil to the nastiest tank scrapings and "reprocessed" industrial waste oils you could imagine and the ONLY one that didn't require a fair amount of "diddling" was the number 2 fuel.
 
  #76  
Old 03-02-11, 07:42 PM
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I'm sorry to learn of your smokeout and glad that no one was injured!
I didn't abandon you, I’ve been crazy busy with all of the things that
I PMed you about. Everyone following this thread now knows the importance
of a proper installation! The controls should have prevented this. The
installer obviously kicked you. He probably never should have gone forward
with a residential installation of a waste oil burner. I've been trying to
help, thinking that your setup was proper and acceptable. Your insurance
company probably won't think so. My setup is in a shop building & I've
been thinking about underground plumbing to my house. I'm sorry, but
I cannot in good conscience continue. After looking at the specs of your boiler
my conclusion is that it is too restrictive (draft wise) to accommodate
this burner without hugely induced draft. The only thing that I could go
along with at this point would be the outbuilding idea. I still want to see
you succeed! EM me directly if you need more help.
 
  #77  
Old 03-04-11, 03:07 PM
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OK. One more question and I am putting the cap on this thread. Does anyone have a good source for two line insulated PEX for burial? They use it for outdoor wood boilers. So far I have seen it for roughly $20/ft. Out of my budget at that price. I was thinking I could put the boiler in my shop. (Completely detached from my house...70 ft away) And run the hot water over to the house with the Thermoflex type tubing. I could probably heat the shop as well, while I was at it. I only heat it to 45-50. I need to make this work somehow, and I am a persistent bugger when I need to be. It would be ideal burning the oil in the shop since that is where I filter it!
 
  #78  
Old 02-22-15, 06:00 PM
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Did you ever figure out the problem?
 
 

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