Vague natural gas fired boiler recommendation

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Old 02-27-11, 08:14 AM
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Vague natural gas fired boiler recommendation

Current situation is 66 year old cast iron Weil Mclain oil fired boiler working fine and annually maintained. New electric water heater.
2200 sq cape cod with baseboard and in wall convectors on 2 zones.
Slant fin says heat loss is 53K
Chimney is ok and original 66 years old
Want to convert to gas and don't want to spend more than needed. Does not look like I can direct vent, too many windows to find a suitable spot.

What I am looking for is a simple conversion with a durable boiler that is not so overly complicated that the service and future repairs will out weigh the fuel savings. I also have no floor drains in my basement which would require pump removal of condensate if I went that route.

Your thoughts?
 

Last edited by angelo1100; 02-27-11 at 08:37 AM.
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Old 02-27-11, 03:09 PM
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Chimney is ok and original 66 years old
I wouldn't assume that. Chances are that building codes will require a liner. Even if they don't require it, I would install one.

If I was in the market for a gas fired boiler, I would look closely at this one:

U.S. Boiler::ES2, gas-fired, cast iron boiler for home heating
 
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Old 02-28-11, 03:42 AM
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There really are no truly 'simple' boilers these days that have decent efficiency. Even the 'simple' ones have ever-fancier aquastats and other controls.

The Burnham that Trooper linked is a nice boiler. So is the Revolution. Really, any of the major manufacturers make a good standard boiler.

But the modcons have been around a while now and some of them are looking like they will be durable. And if durable is a consideration, that implies you will be in the house a long time and therefore would benefit immensely from long-term fuel savings.

For a low heat low like yours the Triangle Tube 60 would be a good match.

Or a standard boiler in the ~50k BTU range.

The heat loss is usually a bit conservative and you only need that output a couple hours a year anyway.
 
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Old 02-28-11, 03:47 PM
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That Burnham looks like a nice value. I assume I may need to install a chimney liner at that time. Is that something that a heating contractor would do or would that be sublet to a chimney guy? I have a masonry chimney typical of a New England cape, 2 flue, 1 for the fireplace. Any idea a rough figure on the cost of a liner?
 
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Old 02-28-11, 04:14 PM
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The liner for my ES2 cost me about $1200 installed.
 
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Old 02-28-11, 04:57 PM
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Burnham REQUIRES a liner with that boiler, so regardless of the codes, or the condition of the chimney, you would need one if you went with that model.

I was gonna ballpark just what droo said... and would only allow the boiler techs to do it if they could prove to me that they knew how.
 
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Old 02-28-11, 05:10 PM
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If you have an internal chimney with a clay flue liner and your local codes do not require a chimney liner you could do a series 3. Same boiler as the ES2 but 84% and many jurisdictions will not require a liner in many areas. Personally I would line with either stainless steel (best) or aluminum liner.
Same controls and I would also add the ODR card for added fuel savings.
 
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Old 02-28-11, 05:53 PM
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My liner is stainless steel.

What exactly is different about the Series 3 anyway? I can't make out any difference based on the literature.
 
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Old 03-08-11, 04:05 PM
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Originally Posted by NJ Trooper View Post
I wouldn't assume that. Chances are that building codes will require a liner. Even if they don't require it, I would install one.

If I was in the market for a gas fired boiler, I would look closely at this one:

U.S. Boiler::ES2, gas-fired, cast iron boiler for home heating
I like that boiler. My heat loss was 53k, do you recommend that size, 77,000 btu?
National Grid is sending me a heating contractor to give "free" estimate on Friday. Do I show him my heat loss sheet or see if he offers to do his own?
As an FYI I have a friend who used to install Burnham oil fired units and is still mad about their poor quality in the past. Are the US made units made of higher quality materials?
 
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